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Full text of "Christian Cynosure"





•IN 8BGRET HAVE I SAID NOTHING. "—Jesus Christ. 



Vol. XYIII., No. 1. 



CHICAGO, THUESDAT, SEPTEMBER 24, 1885. 



Wholk No. 804. 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

SSI West Madison Sf^-eet, Chicago. 

J.P.STODDARD General Agent 

W. I. PHILLIPS Publisher. 

Subscription per yeah $2,00. 

If paid strictly in advance $1.50. 

K^^No paper discontinued unless so requested by the 
subscriber, and all arrearages paid..:^g 

Address all letters for publication to Editor Christian 
Cynosure, Chicago. Writers' names must always be 
given. No manuscript returned unless requested and 
postage enclosed. 

Address all business letters and make all drafts and 
money-orders payable to W. I. Phillips, Treas., 221 
West Madison Street, Chicago. Currency by unregistered 
letter at sender's risk. When writing to change address 
always give the former address. 

[Entered at the Post-offlce at Chicago, 111. , as Second Class matter J 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial : 

Notes and Comments 1 

The United Brethren Com- 
mission 8 

Hon. Samuel D. Hastings 8 
Supreme Lodge, Supreme 

Folly 8 

Contributions : 
The Spirit of Christ Tri- 
umphs over Ku-Klux- 

ism 1 

Balaam Still Tempting Is- 
rael 2 

The Unrevealable 2 

Selected : 
Dr. Charles .Jewett on the 
Secret Temperance Or- 
ders 2 

'A Masonic Secret 3 

Henry Wilson and Wen- 
dell Phillips 3 

Bible Lessons 6 

ThbN.C.A 7 

The American Party 7 

Churches vs. Lodgery — 7 
Lecture List 7 



Correspondence : 
Washington Letter ; A 
Good Templar Defence; 
How the Masons Didn't 
Lay the Corner-Stone ; 
How Callest thou me 
Good; A Spirit-enlight- 
ened Letter; Pith and 

Point ....5,6 

Reform News : 
City Work; Humboldt, 
Neb., Meeting; Which 
ought to Die first, the 
Secret or the Rum Pow- 
er; From the General 

Agent 4,9 

The Home 10 

Temperance 11 

Literature ., 12 

The Churches 12 

Home Hints 13 

Farm Notes 14 

In Brief 1.5 

News of the Week 16 

Business 16 

Markets 16 



The overwhelming defeat of high license in Wis- 
consin last Tuesday is regarded by the anti-prohibi- 
tion press as a saloon victory. It is to a narrow 
vision; but as a wrestler drops to his knee to get a 
lower and better hold, the cause of true temperance 
will show this to have been a victory. The pretense 
of high license to restrain liquor-drinking was long 
ago explo'ied. The difference between license low 
or license high is only that it; helps selfish tax-pay- 
ers. The rule of the saloon will be necessary in 
some communities for its overthrow, just as the 
domineering of the slave power was needed to make 
a self-seeking nation awake to its danger. 



The Postoffice Inspectors arrested a man in Chica- 
go a few days since, for conducting a lottery business 
and making a fraudulent use of the mails. But 
lodges and Catholic fairs post their bills openly for 
raffles, which are lotteries under another, name and 
no officer of the law is aroused to protest or prevent 
the business. What State rights' nonsense, by the 
way, is it that allows the lottery to flourish in Louisi- 
ana or Kentucky while elsewhere it is suppressed? 
Is there not a national regalation or prohibition of 
this evil as much needed as for divorce, bankruptcy 
or intemperance? 



It has been the vexation of some men's lives that 
that the seven million horse power of Niagara 
Falls was going to a perpetual waste doing nothing 
but roar and foam and furnish the wide world with 
a stupendous show. These pragmatic gentlemen 
have been hoping much from the electrical inventors, 
and not altogether in vain. They have seen the few 
mills and manufactories put up to catch a little of 
the wasting power sold out to the State, with the ex- 
pectation that they will be cleared off and the prime- 
val condition of the awful region restored. But they 
have a ditch cut years ago from the rapids above the 
fall which can be made of use outside the State park. 
This canal now furnishes about 5,0.00 horse power 
and which may be greatly increased by enlarging the 
cut. It is also found practicable to transmit power 



for electrical purposes from Niagara to Buffalo, a dis- 
tance of twent3'-five miles, with a great saving over 
the power of steam — a saving of $40,000 per annum 
on a plant for 1,000 arc lights. It is believed that 
with improved batteries power can be transmitted 
100 or 150 miles and the present generation even 
may see the prophecy of Sir William Thompson ful- 
filled and the power of this mighty torrent used in 
all the large cities of the East. 



The Benjamin Rush Temperance Centennial is 
celebrated this week by the various temperance or- 
ganizations and several of the religious denomina- 
tions. A "Centennial Temperance Conference" is ap- 
pointed in Philadelphia on Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, to which a large number of delegates have been 
elected, and which will be addressed by a number of 
able speakers. The National Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union through whose efforts ten States 
have during the present j'ear adopted temperance in- 
struction in the public schools, is taking a profound 
interest in this important anniversary, and has ar- 
ranged for meetings throughout the country wher- 
ever it has organizations. 



The managers of the new Catholic University at 
Washington invited, so the German papers report, a 
somewhat celebrated character, Janssen, from Frank- 
fort on the Main, to be one of their professors. He 
declined, though offered a salary of 50,000, francs or 
$10,000. Catholic as well as Protestant America may 
be congratulated on his decision, since it is believed 
that his celebrity as an "historian" rests on the sen- 
sational attempt to prove from documentary evi- 
dence that the condition of all Europe before the 
Reformation was in the best sense prosperous, and 
that that mightiest social and religious movement 
since the days of the early church, was the greatest 
evil that ever befell the northern and central na- 
tions of Europe. An "historian" of such caliber 
might, in this country, be in danger of losing both 
character and reputation, if exposed to the rifles of 
our sham-hunters. If we cannot abide Chinamen, 
what do we need of such professors of history? 



The Chicago Knight Templars are becoming pi- 
ous. They have long claimed for themselves the 
Christian name: perhaps it is with compunction for 
their dilatory practice that at a meeting of the 
Apollo Commandery last week, when twenty-two 
candidates were put through the Red Cross degree, 
during the banquetting that followed till past mid- 
night the speakers were the following "Sir Knights" 
and "Princes:" G. C. Lorimer, Baptist; Frank M. 
Bristol, Methodist; Samuel Fallows, Reformed Epis- 
copal bishop; and Clinton Locke, Episcopal canon. 
The pastor of a Baptist church in this city said the 
other day that he once had much respect for Lori- 
mer, but when he saw him get the Knight Templar 
Masons into his church and "go through his monkey 
tricks with them" he was disgusted with the man 
and led to doubt the sincerity of his Christian pro- 
fession. 

If Humbolt, Neb., has some of the best people 
of the earth, it has also some who are their antipo- 
des, who get an occasional inspiration at least, from 
the bottomless pit. Take for instance this extract 
from a local paper, which is worse in its way than 
the eggs thrown by other Masons: "Two ladies 
were returning home with the ministers when the as- 
sault was made. It was certainly very wrong for 
the parties, whoever they may have been, to admin- 
ister such severe punishment upon the ladies, and 
they should be justly punished for it, but the two 
'divines' certainly needed all they got, and a dose of 
tar and feathers in addition would not have been out 
of place. The lecture which was delivered by one 
of them in the People's church last Friday evening, 
was, if properly stated to us, disgraceful, untrue, 
and obscene in the extreme. The main bent of the 
discourse seemed to be to abuse the grand old order 
of Masonry, which stood for a thousand years be- 
fore this upstart would-be reformer ever breathed 
the free air of this glorious republic, and will prob- 
ably be growing in numbers and strength long after 
he has accepted a position in the infernal regions. It 



seems to us that parties should be well-known before 
they are allowed to speak in the pulpit of our church- 
es. Such imposters as these disgrace Christianity, 
and their influence in the community for bad can 
hardly be estimated." 



Wi*ATON COLILGl lMAXY 
SMboalon, lUinois 



Rev. Mr. Parkhurst, in his tour around the 
world did not see a single new heathen temple. All 
the pagan worship was in old dilapidated temples. 
Not very long ago there were 100,000 idol-gods in 
Raratonga; but a young man lately visiting the Brit- 
ish Museum saw among the wonders there the first 
Raratonga idol his eyes ever beheld, though he was 
born and lived 19 years in Raratonga. — Intelligencer. 
There is a w.arning, as well as a hopeful lesson in 
such news. So long as we are sure that Satan is 
not giving up his fight for the dominion of this 
world, so long we may be sure that he will not aban- 
don his surest means of separating the souls of men 
from their God; and no reader of Bible history can 
doubt that this was by false worships. But as Gos- 
pel light increases round the earth and the intelli- 
gence of men is aroused, the grosser forms of idola- 
try must be given up and something more nearly 
counterfeiting the truth substituted. Thus we see 
the lodge religions flourishing beside the churches 
and even around their altars. The rude and un- 
seemly rites of barbarous and savage tribes lose 
their power, but the "beautiful" formulas of the 
lodge engage the attention of the refined but undis- 
cerning worshiper in Christian lands. Thus the tide 
falls with us while it rises among the islands of the 
sea and in lands long shrouded with the darkness of 
superstition and paganism. 



Hon. William H. Barnum, Senator from Connect- 
icut and manager for the Democratic party in the 
Cleveland campaign last year, in an interview in 
this city expressed the opinion that the increase of 
the United States army was a necessity demanding 
immediate attention, and that garrisons of from 500 
to 2,000 men should be permanently stationed in 
our laro-e cities where outbreaks are liable to occur. 
As nine out of every ten, at least, of the riots which 
demand military suppression grow out of strikes, 
set on foot by secret labor lodges, Mr. Barnum's 
proposition might be resolved into a kind of govern- 
ment supervision or standing-army regulation of 
these sources of discontent and disorder. There is 
a more economical and hopeful solution of this ques- 
tion, and it lies with the Christian church. Let our 
pulpits demand the practical enforcement of the 
great rule laid down by Christ for the regulation of 
human intercourse, especially between the working- 
man and the employer; and let the churches insist 
that their membership be clear of secret combina- 
tions. We would then find, instead of a demand 
for standing armies to hold down the workiugmeu, 
that a revision of our laws bearing upon the rela- 
tions of capital and an amicable arbitration of ques- 
tions difficult to settle would anticipate and prevent 
such threatening outbreaks as have transpired in a 
score of cities during the present year. 



THE 8PIBIT OF CHRIST TRIUMPHS OVER 
KU-KLUXISM. 



LETTER FROM BEO. COUNTEE OF MEMPHIS. 



Memphis, Tenn., Sept. 12, 1885. 
Editor Cynosure, 

Dear Bro.— I have been kept quite busy since 
the recent attack made on my house, answering letr 
ters, which have numbered as high as five daily. 
You have no idea how much I have rejoiced during 
the last three weeks in learning that so mauy are 
eno-aged in this the greatest work of the nineteenth 
century, and more on account of the love and ten- 
derness shown me by the members of my church, 
the Tabernacle Baptist, many of whom have avowed 
their purpose to die by my side, if needs be. I 
have preached regularly in my church every Sunday 
since those inhuman monsters visited my house, 
without any relaxation whatever; and they were 
loud in saying that I ought to hold up and quit urg- 
ing people to leave their societies; but by some 



i^ 



.si_ 



I 



■.^^ 



THE CHRTSTIAN CTTTOSTTRE. 



September 24, 1885 






means 1 am impelled by a supernatural inthieuoe to 
ciy aloud and spare not, to pivaeh the gos^vl of 

SEPARATION VROM THE WUKKP. 

Last Sunday night was my first Sabbatli out at 
night since the second Sabbath in August, and I 
talkeii to a large congreg:ition. It was indeed a 
jubilee to my souL My subject was, -A bouud 
Jesus." \John IS: 12.) And the Lord helped me; 
and. :\i I never preach now, or as I call it, cast out 
my net without seeing how many fish are in it, I re- 
joiceil greatly to see five of my people leave their 
5ei.'ret organizations and take their stand with the 
church. 

After services I was estx^rted to my home, nearly 
a mile fn.>m the church, by almost the entire congre- 
gation, and 1 shall uevtr. luttr forget how my heart 
swelkxl within me as Lhey marched with almost 
death-like stillness to my door, and then how I was 
almost (.-arrieil into the door where five or six were 
watching to keep the enemies from slipping up and 
burning my home as they have threatened t^ do. 

There are only three ministers who have spoken 
at all on this subject: Elder B. A. Imes, a Congre- 
gationalist, Klder Brinkley and myself who are Bap- 
tists. Neither of the others have been molested; 
but they attackeii me for two reasons: first, I sup- 
pose. Ijec-ause I was so diminutive, being only 4 feet 
I'l inches tall and weighing luo pounds; Bro. Brink- 
ley being a 200 pounder, and Bro. Imes about 150. 
The other reason was because I was an active society 
man. belonging to the Masons, a Knight Templar: 
in the l)dd-felTows. a Past Grand Master; in the 
I. O. I.s Umaculates), a Knight of Orient; in the 
Tabernacles, a Knight of Taber: and a Knight of 
Pythias. Hence you see in all I had gone to the 
rank of Knighthood. I was sought by them, initi- 
ated privately, and given all the degrees for m}- in- 
fluence, which I gave in return. In all their grand 
affairs I was generally chief spokesman, and they 
knew that my influence turned against them would 
be felt, and I must be stopped, and the getting rid 
of me would, as they thought, put an end to the 
whole matter. For seventeen years I have been an 
earnest worker in the cause of secret organizations. 
I was indeed deluded. I imagined I was of great 
importance, to be sought and initiated into their so- 
c-alletl mysteries kree of cear(;e. 

The awakening, thank God, is greater than the 
delusion. I rejoice greatly that I am found worthy 
to suffer persecution for Christ's sake. The clouds 
of vengeance yet hang heavilv over me. and I am 
expecting an attack at any time. My people are 
guarding my house ever\- night, and are anxious to 
get me a house in town where I shall not have so 
much to fear from another assault from these men, 
many of whom are Christians, or at least profess to 
be. and who seem to believe they are justified in 
committing the crime of murder. 

I am undaunted in m}- purpose to go on. Some 
few of my members remain under the ban of society 
delusion. I am trying to be patient with all, and in 
due time I believe they will come out from among 
them. I do not think that the society people have 
seen their blunder, but it is no doubt working 
against them. Many persons will leave them. I 
shall tr\- and occasionally drop you a line on the 
situation of affairs here. May Christian people 
everywhere pray for us. R. N. Cocntee. 



BALAAM 8TJLL TEMPTING ISRAEL. 



I5V WILMAM KENTON. 



A "Sir Knight'Y?) conducted the Y. M. C. A. 
prayer meeting yesterday in St Paul, and durincr 
his remarks stated tiiat "Balaam crjuld not prevail 
with Go<l to curse Israel." But if this mock Sir 
Knight was not blind drunk spiritually with his 
lodge demonisra, he might see that as Balaam did 
contrive a plan whereb\- the Israelites did bring the 
curse of Gwl ujxin themselves, so to-day God's peo- 
ple, by mingling at the communion services with the 
modern Moabites of the lodge, are preparing the 
way for G^xl's curse upon themselves. 

In that model of all lodges, the Ma.sonic kxlge, 
we see "the {Xjint within the circle." that symbol of 
the Moabitic abomination, the Moabitic god, Baal 
Peor. the symbol of the sun, and the ancient phallic 
and sun-worship essentially imitated. The Israelites 
l)y running after that abomination and bowing to 
the worship of Baal incurred the fierce anger of the 
Lord, whereby 24,000 of them were slain. 

And are not mo<;lem churches, by reason of their 
fellowship with the followers after Baal in the mod- 
ern secret lodge, and thus defying the command- 
ments of the New Testament, provoking similar 
judgments? Surely, yes. If God did not wink at 
iniquity then, why should we suppose that he does 
now? Every man who joined himself to Baal Peor 
was slain, and their heads hung up against the sun. 



But it was not until Phiueas arose in the congrega- 
tion and with a javelin he thrust through the parts 
symbolized by "the point within the circle" in a 
prince of Israel and a daughter of a prince of the 
Midiauites, whereby both the prince and the daugh- 
ter were slain, that the plague was stayed and the 
wrath of God turned away from Israel. Thus 
Balaam did succeed in bringing the curse of God 
uixm Israel. 

And. again, in the letter to the church at Perga- 
mos ^Rev. 2: 14), we read, "Thou hast there them 
that hold the doctrine of Balaam, who taught Balak 
to cast a stumbling-block before the children of 
Israel." Now, what is our "Sir Knight" doing? 
He weai-s his secret society badge side by side with 
his Y. M. C. A. badge, introducing himself and 
secret onlcr to all the joung men who visit the 
Y. M. C. A. rooms. Is not that similar to the work 
of Balaam, casting a stumbling-block before the 
young men of the city, seducing them into his secret 
abominations? The readers of the Cynosure know 
what he will do with them if he gets them into that 
secret lodge room. 

What shall we do? Let us not despair, God 
reigns. "The M'capons of our warfare are not car- 
nal," like that of Phineas, "but spiritual and might}' 
through God to the pulling down of strongholds." 
2 Cor. 10: 4. If they cast us out, and even silence 
us in the churches, we have our closets for prayer, 
and there we can fight and win the battle. If they 
cast us into prison, there we can also praj' and sing 
praises to God. The}- will not always be able to 
"vex" us "with their wiles," whereby they "beguile" 
the young men into their secret abominations. And 
we may save some from the dark and loathsome 
lodge if we do not give way to despair. 

St. Paul, Minn. 



TEE UNREVEALABLE. 



Br D. VANDEVENTER. 



Masons say there are secrets in Masonry that can- 
not be revealed. This proves their heathen origin. 

Paul found at Athens an altar dedicated to the 
unknown God. Those poor, benighted heathen could 
not solve the mystery; to them it was unrevealable; 
and in their blindness each one bowed to a god fash- 
ioned by his own fancy. As the heathen did, so do 
Masons. "And now they sin more and more, and 
have made them * * idols according to their own 
understanding." Hosea 13: 2. This is the case in 
which Masons are found: each one has a god of his 
own, as Masonry does not and dare not accept the 
God revealed in the Bible as its God; and for any- 
thing that Masonry teaches he is, or may be, one of 
those evil gods who was supposed to be the creator 
of the material worlds, or that great Brahma who 
bursted the wonderful mundane egg and brought 
forth the worlds in all their grandeur. This is one 
of the unrevealables of Masonry. 

To further prove this point take the teaching of 
the great Pythagoras, whom Masons claim as a 
brother. He was a heathen philosopher, and to get 
some idea of the god he worshiped let us turn to the 
American Cyclopedia, Vol. 14, P. 120: "The es- 
sence of number is unity, which is at once odd and 
even, and contains in itself in germ all the universe. 
It is both the form and substance of all things, and 
is identical with the Deity." Pythagoras was an idol 
worshiper and as Masons claim a brotherhood with 
him, his god must be their god, and hence the Grand 
Architect of Masons may be the "essence of num- 
ber." No wonder Maaons claim there is an unre- 
vealable mystery connected with that sublimely ridi- 
culous and heathen-like institution. 

Another thing Masonry either dare not, or cannot 
reveal, is how they expect to "purify man's evil na- 
ture" without the blood of Christ. Or how they 
expect to "rescue man from the world in whose ob- 
scurity he has been wandering." See "Manual of 
the Lodge" by Mackey, P. 39. (Jr how the "gavel" 
is to fit a man for heaven while Christ is rejected. 
Manual, p. .3.5. Or how it is to completely accom- 
plish the new birth" (Manual, p. 21), while it rejects 
Christ "and treats his blood as an unholy thing?" 
Hebrews 10: 29. 

The foregoing quotation may suffice to show where 
the unrevealable of Masonry lies, and establish its 
sacrilegious claims beyond the possibility of a suc- 
cessful refutation. Masonry arrogates to itself pow- 
er that belongs exclusively to the blood of Christ. 

In II Timothy 3d chapter we read of a class of 
"blasphemers" who are "ever learning and never able 
to come to a knowledge of the truth." In Mackey's 
Manual of the Lodge, page 93, we read that a "Ma^ 
son's wages are truth;" that that the Mason is "ever 
to be in search of truth, but is never to find it." Truth 
then is a secret hid from Masonic eyes, therefore 
Masons cannot reveal it. 



^Vc are then forced to the conclusion that Masonry 
is a tissue of lies. "They that observe lying vanities 
forsake their own mercy." Jonah 2: 8. But for Ma- 
sons to say Masonry is not exposed in the books pub- 
lished is to deny a fact. Morgan, Bernard, Konayne, 
and others give Masonry substantially as I learned 
it in the lodge. Therefore, I know that Masonry is 
exposed. 

DR. CHARLES JE WE TT ON TUE SECRET TEM- 
PERANCE ORDERS. 

[From his liook, "Forty Ye.^r's Fight with the Driuk Demon," 
1S72, pp. HO, 152, 155.) 

Another movement, which lost us the active co- 
operation of thousands of excellent and able men, was 
the substitution of close for open organizations. 
Prior to the formation of the order of Sons of Tem- 
perance, all our public meetings were open to the 
world. There was no ritual to control the order of 
public services which was determined by surround- 
ing circumstances. The oi)ening exercises, after the 
president of the society had called the meeting to 
order, were generally, prayer, the reading of the min- 
utes, or the record of the last meeting and the read- 
ing of reports, if special duties had been assigned 
to committees. These services did not usually con- 
sume more than twenty minutes of the evening. 
The remainder was devoted to a free discussion of 
the subject of temperance by interested parties, un- 
less provision had been made for a regular lecture, 
in which case, of course, that service had precedence. 
But whether the evening hours were occupied with 
the lecture or a general discussion, all was in the 
hearing of the masses. 

I have worked in good faith for years with and 
for Sons of Temperance and Good Templars, believ- 
ing, all the while, that open societies would serve 
our purpose better, and that their re-establishment, 
with the addition of a proper financial feature, would 
be found to be a necessity before a triumph can be 
reached. I saw, however, that close organizations 
must have a trial, and a thorough one, before the 
earnest and excellent brethren, working in and 
through them,. could be made to see the necessity of 
other forms.. They have been tried for nearly twice 
the period during which we worked in open organi- 
zations, and for one, I think it time to look at the 
facts as they are, and, instead of an obstinate ad- 
herence to existing and partial methods only, see if 
some measures cannot be devised for bringing our 
whole force into the field. 

Seven-eighths of our weekly temperance meetings 
now are held in private rooms. Few of the aged 
are there to give, the proceedings the dignity and 
gravity which their presence generally confers, and 
the children are left at home; and worst of all, the 
drinking portion of the community, the very portion 
which we wish to influence by our arguments and ap- 
peals, are excluded. They have not the pass-word. 

What a blow would be struck at Christianity, if, 
from the regular meetings of the sanctuary or the 
weekly meeting for religious conference, sinners 
were excluded, ueless they came with the pass-word, 
or would declare beforehand their readiness to join 
the church. At the close of the exercises in open 
societies, you can take advantage of any good im- 
pressions made to get men to join the society, which 
they can do on the spot by signing the pledge of ab- 
stinence, it being a part of the constitution, and 
from that moment the pledged man is a member. 
In close organizations, considerable time must elapse 
and certain ceremonies intervene, before membership 
is attained. 

Once more. Those petty rivalries which are now 
frequently occurring between the different orders, 
where they exist in the same community, and often 
between subordinate and neighboring- organizations 
of the same order; and those unbrotherly strifes for 
offices and honors, which too often occur now, were 
unknown in the open organizations, absolutely un- 
known. No doubt, my brethren who have embraced 
the cause within the last twenty-five years, and nev- 
er worked in open societies at all, will be surprised 
at these utterances; but men, past fifty, who worked 
in the open societies which existed in New England 
by thousands before the year 1840, will fully under- 
stand me; such men as Senator Wilson of Massa- 
chusetts, Gov. Buckingham of Connecticut, Neal 
JJow of Maine, and Amos C. Barstow of Rhode Is- 
land, and thousands of others past the age of fifty. 
Let our younger brethren, before they express their 
unbelief in the historical truth of my statements, 
ask such men, and lam willing that their statements 
shall stand, whether for my justification or condem- 
nation. How far they were ertective, let the facts 
tell. In less than fifteen years, the style of opera- 
tions I have described, so far revolutionized the pub- 
lic opinion of Massachusetts that the license system 
was abolished in more than three-fourths of the coun- 



t 






1 






September 24, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN" CYKOSURE. 



ties of the State. The old style of operating gave 
place, in the years 1840, '41, and '42, to the Wash- 
ingtonian System, and that very soon to the Sons of 
Temperance and other forms of close organization, 
and they have had the field almost exclusively for 
over twenty-five years; and what is the present sta- 
tus of temperance in that State as compared with 
what it was in 1843? It may be doubted whether 
we are stronger at the polls now than we were twen- 
ty-five years ago. If we have gained at all, it is but 
a slight gain to have been secured by twenty-five 
years of labor, even with whatever of hindrance may 
have fallen in our path. For myself, I believe as 
firmly as I believe any fact that l"'cannot absolutely 
demonstrate, that, had the work of reform been pros- 
ecuted for the last twenty-five years in New Eng- 
land in open organizations, with such added provis- 
ions as experience might have suggested, the liquor 
traffic would have been crushed before the public at- 
tention could have been diverted from that issue by 
the great struggle for the preservation of the Union. 



A MASONIC SECRET. 



While it is true that the barbarous ceremonies and 
oaths of Freemasonry are no longer a secret, we are 
free to admit that there are some secrets deposited 
in the historic archives of the fraternity which have 
not yet been fully revealed. Freemasonry tried to 
keep the secrets, and swear down the facts in the 
case of Wm. Morgan who was Masonically kidnap- 
ped and murdered by the blood-thirstj', midnight 
conspirators, but the ghost of Morgan would not 
down, and the investigation instituted by the legis- 
lature of the State of New York clearly evidenced 
that Freemasonry stole one of its citizens and spir- 
ited him away to his death doom. Though some 
Masons were condemned to a few months' imprison- 
ment for complicity in the infamous crime, none 
were ever hanged as they should have been. For 
this crime the institution was hung as high as Ha- 
man with its own cable-tow, but in some way the pu- 
trescent carcass has been cut down and resurrected 
on the fine points of Masonic blood-aud-murder fel- 
lowship. There is at least one Masonically-kept se- 
cret we would like very much to know, and that is, 
what became of Rev. Ensign B. Hill, a minister who 
belonged to the Allegheny Conference of the Wes- 
leyan Methodist Connection. Brother Hill had been 
a Freemason, and of course had renounced his blas- 
phemous and murderous obligations as is necessar}' 
is order to membership in our connection of church- 
es. It was known that he had written an expose of 
the diabolical institution as far as he had gone and 
intended its publication. To consummate his pur- 
pose he took his manuscript, and with his horse and 
buggy started for a village some miles away where 
there were facilities for such work, intending to have 
his manuscript printed. On that journey he forever 
disappeared from sight or knowledge of his friends 
and the conference to which he belonged. For sev- 
eral successive sessions of the Allegheny Confei'encc 
his name was called, but no "track or trace" of their 
missing member answered to the solemn roll-call. 
The last that was ever seen of him was on that fatal 
journey with his manuscript exposing the abomina- 
tions of Masonry, which he was now about to have 
published and for which purpose he was driving 
across the country toward the village where he ex- 
pected to secure the printing of his book. The last 
sight of him by any but the fraternity of such won- 
drous charity, was toward nightfall in the company 
of two Freemasons. From that fatal moment the 
impenetrable pall of darkness fell upon his pathway. 
Ensign B. Hill was never seen nor heard of more. 
Even his horse and buggy were never found; "no 
track or trace of remembrance," to speak Masoni- 
cally, was ever had of "so vile and perjured a wretch" 
of a horse and buggy as could assay to carry Mason- 
ic secrets to a printer's office for publication and sale 
in the open market. As far as the circumstances 
connected with "the accursed taking oflT" of Ensign 
B. Hill, a Wesleyan minister, is concerned, that is a 
Masonic secret remaining "secure and inviolable" in 
the breast of the brotherhood to this "year of light, 
1885." As a representative of the Wesleyan Metho- 
dist Connection of America, one of whose ministers 
has disappeared under such circumstances, we lift 
our voice of inquiry in the ears of Freemasonr}' and 
inquire: WherC is Ensign B. Hill ? When and 
where and by whom was the death penalty of the 
lodge executed upon him? Was Masonic vengeance 
carried out to the letter in cutting his throat across? 
by teai'ing open his left breast and taking the heart 
and vitals from thence and casting them over his left 
shoulder? by severing his body "in twain and divid- 
ing it to the north and south and buriaingthe bowels 
to ashes in the center and scattering the ashes to the 
four winds of heaven? or was some other method 
adopted, as in the case of Morgan, to carry out the 



spirit of murder breathed in the fraternal obligations 
of this institution of wonderful benevolence? For 
the sake of kindred and friends, for the sake of the 
church and conference of which he was an honored 
member, where, where, is Ensign B. Hill, if liv- 
ing, and where sleeps his remains if dead? Will not 
the brotherhood as much as point a silent finger at 
the place of his mortal repose that we may erect a 
monument to the memory of our martyred brother? 
No voice or "sign" from the inner sanctuary of the 
lodge answers our piteous appeal. Never say again 
that Freemasonry has no secrets. It has secrets dark 
as ever reveled in the midnight caves of profession- 
al banditti, or stalked the deck of a pirate craft. — 
Wesleyan Methodist. 

HENR7 WILSON AND WENDELL PHILLIPS. 



[John R. French tn the North American Review for September.] 
Early in his life at Natick, Wilson had organized 
among his fellow-mechanics a debating society, of 
which he was an active member. It met on one 
evening every week for the discussion, usually, of 
such questions as were agitating the public mind. 
It was in this humble association that he learned 
that plain, simple, straightforward way of present- 
ing his argument which characterized his speeches 
and debates in his subsequent career. He also per- 
suaded his fellow-students at Concord to form a sim- 
ilar association, of which, also, he was the most 
active spirit. His first appearance as a public 
speaker was under these circumstances. In 1837, 
and a few subsequent years, the young men of New 
Hampshire had a State association, devoted to the 
interests of the rising movement against negro slav- 
ery. The membership of the association was found 
chiefly in the schools of the State, the college at 
Hanover, and the academies at Exeter, Plainfield, 
New Hampton, Concord, Gilmanton, New London, 
and Pembroke. With their contributions these 
boys kept one or two eloquent lecturers in the field, 
and annually held at the capital a rousing State con- 
vention of two or three days' duration. In August, 
in the year in which Wilson was in attendance at 
the Concord school, this association held its annual 
gathering, to which he had been elected as one of 
the delegates from the branch association of that 
town. It was largely attended by many spirited 
and noble young men, who, in the intervening years, 
have become distinguished as leaders in the progress 
of the times. 

Stephen S. Foster was there, a man of consider- 
able intellectual force, who, through all the years of 
the anti-slavery conflict, rendered the most faithful 
and self-sacrificing services. But at this conven- 
tion — and it was a common habit with him — he al- 
lowed his zeal to outrun his discretion. He intro- 
duced a resolution severely censuring John Quincy 
Adams for some recent utterance in Congress, 
wherein that noble old man had not come quite up 
to the high-water mark of the more advanced anti- 
slavery sentiment. During the previous year young 
Wilson had been in Washington, and had made the 
acquaintance of Mr. Adams, for whom he had a 
high admiration, especially for the single-handed 
fight he was making against the slave power. He 
believed, therefore, that the venerable statesman de- 
served the hearty approval and encouragement of 
the anti-slavery people of the North, and not their 
censure, even if he did apparently halt at some 
points of their faith. A young man from Dart- 
mouth College, Horace Eaton (afterward well-known 
as a warm-hearted and philanthropic Presbyterian 
clergyman), spoke earnestly against the resolution, 
and was followed by Henry Wilson in his first puli- 
lic speech. Wilson was always modest, and in those 
days he was bashful. He felt that the passage of 
the resolution would be a great wrong, but he shrank 
from participation in the debate. However, entreat- 
ed and encouraged by a friend at his side, he timid- 
ly rose to his feet, and I had the pleasure of telling 
the president his name — as it was called for — slight- 
ly to Wilson's confusion. But he was soon under 
good headway, for his most earnest feelings were 
enlisted. His opening remarks evidently command- 
ed the attention of the convention, .and it was not 
many minutes before he began to secure applause 
from all sides, as he spoke eloquently of the intre- 
pidity of the venerable ex-President making his 
brave fight almost alone in the midst of the most 
defiant opposition. He pleaded for words of cheer 
from the generous young men of New Hampshire, 
and opposed this attempt to inflict a pharisaical cen- 
sure. It was really a grand speech, and the ap- 
plause that continued till he took his seat, while tes- 
tifying that the convention was with him, gave him, 
also, great encouragement in his determination to 
become a public speaker. 

While Wilson was thus addressing the audience, 
a young man, an Apollo in manly grace and beauty. 



entered the church; a stranger, evidently, as no one 
seemed to recognize him, and he took a seat near 
the door, in the rear of the audience. As Wilson 
closed, this young man joined heartily in the ap- 
plause — indeed, he seemed to lead it. Rising and 
coming forward, he asked if a stranger, not a mem- 
ber of the convention, nor a citizen of the State, 
even, but deeply interested in the discussion, might 
be permitted to join in the debate. That silvery 
voice and princely presence would have commanded 
a welcome in any gathering, but among these young 
men came voices from all over the hall, which prof- 
fered him the freedom of the platform with a cor- 
dial greeting. The president asked his name. 
"Wendell Phillips," was the response. Those only 
who are old enough to remember how hated and de- 
spised was the anti-slavery cause in its early days, 
and how the peerless eloquence and patrician rank 
of this young Boston lawyer, this son of her first 
mayor, this noblest member of one of her oldest and 
most honored families, whose deeds of virtue and 
munificent charities had made illustrious every era 
of Massachusetts' history, had lifted up that cause 
from this hate and reproach — they only can imag- 
ine the enthusiastic salutation which shook that 
church on the announcement of his name. Every 
member of the convention sprang to his feet to as- 
sure Wendell Phillips that he was welcome. More 
than forty years have come and gone since that 
August day — years crowded with great historical 
events — yet still that scene of welcome remains as 
vivid in my mind as if it had occurred but yester- 
day. 

Mr. Phillips made one of his rarest speeches — 
first, in warm praise of the generous spirit and prac- 
tical sense of the eloquent young man who had last 
addressed the convention, and then in glowing 
eulogy of the "old man eloquent," the brave cham- 
pion, in Congress, of free speech, and of the right 
of petition. At his close, Mr. Phillips made his 
way to the pew in which Mr. Wilson was seated^ 
and, taking him warmly by the hand, repeated to 
him, personally, what he had said to the convention 
his most hearty approval of what had fallen from 
his lips — and assured him of his pleasure in making 
his acquaintance. From that time dated a warm 
friendship between these two men destined to play 
conspicuous parts in the history of the country; and 
from that cordial approval of the great anti-slavery 
orator, and the applause of those hearty j'oung Abo- 
litionists, sprang the open and public attachment of 
Henry Wilson to the anti-slavery cause, which never 
once faltered until Abraham Lincoln, grasping in 
his strong right hand the power of a million armed 
men, smote the monster to the earth. 



Never count a temptation so triumphed over, so 
beaten oflf that it will never assault yon any more. 
Satan has been called Beelzebub, or the god of flies, 
some tell us, because he conies back again and 
again; because it is impossible to drive him away 
that he will not return. Consider the Lord of glory 
himself. When the tempter, thrice encountered and 
thrice defeated in the wilderness left him, it was 
only as we are expressly' told, "for a season." 
There were other hours and powers of darkness still 
to come, when the prince of this world should make 
further proof in the garden whether there was not 
something which he could claim for his own even in 
that Lord, who had so foiled and baffled him in the 
desert. And shall we think that when he departs 
from us it is not more than for a reason? Never so 
long as you bear about these sinful bodies, count 
any corruption to be so dead in you that you are 
perfectly safe from it henceforth, that it can never 
stir or trouble you again. How much that seems 
dead will be shown by sad experience to have been 
only sleeping; like snakes, which, frozen in winter, 
lose for a time their power to harm, appear as 
though there were no life in them, but brought to 
the warmth, can hiss and sting again. How many 
an old corruption is, perhaps, at this moment thus 
torpid and inactive in us, which yet only awaits the 
returning warmth of a suitable temptation to revive 
in all its malignant strength anew. — Trench. 



— The women of Sweden are steadily advancing 
toward equality before the law with men. Though 
the bill giving them the Parliamentary suSi-age was 
defeated by nine votes, they have a voice in naming 
the electors of the county council, who chooses the 
members of the Upper House, and they vote for 
municipal councilors and parish clergymen. In the 
University of Upsala, Mrs. Kowaleska, a graduate of 
Heidelberg, is professor of mathematics; and in the 
colleges and public schools women are a recognized 
force. The women of Sweden, Norway and Den- 
mark ■'are keeping pace with modern thought and 
movement, and setting an example for their sisters 
in other lands. 



THE CHPISTIAN CYKOStnElB. 



September 24, 1885 



ILetoem News. 



CITY WORK. 



\ 






Chicago. Satimlay, Sept 19, 1SS5. 

Readers of the Cynofurt will be glad to know that 
our cause is advancing hei-e as elsewhere. 

During the past three days I have visited the pas- 
tors of several German and Sweilish churches, and 
find them almost universally opposeii to the lodge. 
so far as they are conversant with its workings. 
They do not endeavor to learn the opinion of their 
memlvrs and preach aci.'onling to these opinions, as 
some of their American brethivn;l>ut taking the sim- 
ple Worvi of God as guide, they walk in the light, 
warning their people against all societies which 
"love darkness nither than light" 

I have just t.x">me from a conference of the Swedish 
Baptist ministers, which is being held in the Fii-st 
Sweilish Baptist church. Here 1 had the pleasure 
of meeting representatives of that society from many 
of the States. Rev. John Nelson, of Austin. Texas; 
Rev. John Swanson. of La Porte, Ind.: Rev. Na- 
thaniel Smith, of Hamilton. N. Y.; Rev. E. Lundin. 
of Tremout Temple. Boston: and Rev. A. B. Orgreu. 
of Stromburg. Neb., were among those present from 
a distance. Through the courtesy of the pastor, 
though their time was very limited. I was allowed a 
few minutes to speak of our work. At the close of 
the meeting several gave their names for the Cyno- 
sure. 

Bro. A. B. Orgren. secretary of a new Theological 
Seminary which the society is building in Strom- 
burg. Neb., gave me many interesting facts concern- 
ing their work. He said. "We shall conduct our 
Seminary on Anti-masonic principles. Our presi- 
dent. Rev. J. A. Edgren, was denounced by Dr. G. 
W. Northrop, president of the Baptist Seminary in 
this city, chiedy because he was an Anti-mason. 
We have forty acres of land out there, ten thousand 
four hundred dollars in cash, and a new building 
which we hope to occupy Nov. 15th next" This 
sounds good for Nebraska. 

Rev. H. Wunder, pastor of St Paul's (Lutheran 
German) church, will consult with the other pastors 
of his denomination and see if they will co-operate 
in the general convention of anti-secret churches. 

Rev. J. L. Meier, pastor of the First German Bap- 
tist church, was very glad to hear of our work and 
cordially invited me to speak to the young men of 
his church on next Wednesday evening, which invi- 
tation, of course. I accepted. 

Rev. Philip DeBey. pastor of the Dutch Reformed 
church, said that he had just returned from a con- 
ference of the churches of his denomination, and 
that they took as strong ground against the lodge as 
ever. He thought that there were a '■'•few narrow 
minded" among them that did not oppose it The 
conference ordered .i.uOO pages of tracts in their 
own language to be printetl for the benefit of such. 
They will co-operate in a convention of anti-secret 
churches. More anon. W. B. Stoddard. 



ing and the ends to be ulnmately attained by it. A 
consultation was had. in which our fears, if we had 
any, tcx^k no part. Trusting in the Lord of hosts, it 
was decided to appoint meetings, and handbills were 
scattered over town. On Friday and Saturday night 
fair audiences, not large on account of heavy rains, I 
gathered to hear Secretary Stoddard. A good sprink- 
liug of secrctists were present; among them the Wor- 1 
shipful Master and he a Jew. In the first lecture, by i 
means of charts, he opened the door of the lodge, 
and took us — Masons and all — right inside. He 
showed us the way through the three degrees, in a 
manner that secured the most respectful attention, 
with no signs of disturbance. Those of us who had 
uever traveled the road before, will not soon forget 
the objects seen and the scenes described. In the 
second lecture the climax was reached, the subject 
being the ^lasonic covenant and its influence on the 
home. It was contrasted with God's covenant with 
Israel, and characterized as being the covenant spok- 
en of in Isaiah 2S: IS. This was a heavy blow dealt 
upon the head of the beast A gentleman, after the 
lecture, said he could not have believed the state- 
ments made but for the countenances of the Masons. 
For a wonder, good order prevailed during all the 
exercises. 

Wishing, however, to give a faithful account, I 
must not omit an incident reminding one of the earl}' 
days of anti-slavery. As the brethren were on the 
way to their lodgings in company with friends, some 
persons suddenlj- issued from an old building, armed 
with rotten eggs. The rest maj' be imagined. A 
convincing argument this, showing the inwardness 
of Masonic institutions to be as repi'esented in the 
lecture. It will help on the good cause. These 
meetings closed Sabbath evening with an impressive 
Gospel sermon by Bro. Stoddard before a large audi- 
ence — a most fitting close. Elder Smith followed 
with pungent words, who also did excellent service 
at other times. Bro. Gault presented his cause in 
the early part of the convention and left Saturday 
for some point farther west. Thus has beeu inau- 
gurated, sooner than I had believed possible, work 
] here against secretism. Once begun it must needs 
be carried on. Continuous work it should be. Thus 
far no blood shed, no bones broken and nobody 
badly frightened. Courage, everybody! Right here 
comes up the question, shall the People's Church and 
Rev. Joel S. Kelsey, its pastor, be sustained by the 
friends of general reform? We anxiously wait to 
hear and know. In hope, yours, 

William C. Bissell. 



"to give it to them," and he would make the crowd 
be still: he having heard me before on national pro- 
hibition. It made a stir among the lovers of strong 
{Continued on 9th pnge.) 



CORRESPCNBENCE. 



w'ashinqton letter. 



TEE BUilBOLLT, NEB., MEETING. 



HcMBOLDT, Neb., Sept 10, 1885. 

Editor Cv-noscre: — Something out of the usual 
onler of things here has come to pass, and I hasten 
to tell you what and how. Last May an effort was 
made to hold a National Reform convention here b}' 
the agent The Lord had a few friends read}- to wel- 
c-ome and a place ready for him to begin work. The 
People's Church was offered for that purpose. He 
preached for us on Sabbath morning and at the M. 
E. church at night A gfxid impression was made. 
On Monday the pastors of the churches met })}■ re- 
quest, to o^^nsult and make the necessarj- arrange- 
ments. But the thing did not meet with extraordi- 
nar\- favor. Some other time would be better. The 
point was yielded for the present. Later in the sea- 
son would be the better time, when due notice would 
be given. At length the notice came to all the pas- 
tors, fixing the time of the convention and asking 
their co-operation. Bros. Gault and R. Smith were 
prompt!}- on hand, when they were informed no an- 
nouncements of the meeting had been made in the 
churches and there would be no co-<jperatiou by the 
pa-stors. Such is the previous history. By mere si- 
lence and standing aloof, embarassment and defeat 
were intended. It was an emergency sprung upon 
us, only to be met unhesitatingly. Co-operation ii 
not to be had here, should be imported, and the 
work of the convention, possibly, broadened and 
deepened by the means. 

That day, Sept. 3d, SecTetary Stoddard was tele- 
graphed to come. The next morning he reported in 
person at the depot I met him there. Never did 
snch gladness fill my heart on meeting any stranger 
as on meeting him, in view of the ohject of his com- 



WHICE OUGHT TO DIE FIRST, TEE SECRET 
OR TEE RUM POWERS 



Maryville, Mo., Sept 12, 1885. 
To that Clnss of Reformers which needs no Reforming, 

Beloved: — The question above is a vital one. 
Until of late I have been of the opinion we had bet^ 
ter la}' away in the grave of forgetfulness first, the 
rum demon. But as I am out on the front line of all 
reforms, have found an argument in favor of laying 
them both aside at one and the same time; though I 
am not very particular which dies first, for I am fully 
satisfied of the fact that in due time they must both 
surely die, or our grand old Republic must go down 
in general crash. These two institutions cannot live 
in a free and independent country like ours. We 
have any amount of proof to fully establish this 
fact. 

In this short letter I will bring forth the one plain 
and simple proof given at our last convention, held 
at Humboldt, Neb., 4th and 5th of this month. 
There were three of us reformers present: Bro. J. P. 
Stoddard, who is at the head of the anti-secret re- 
form; Bro. M. A. Gault, on the front of the National 
Reform work; and myself. While I am with these 
brethren with all my might in those reforms, I never 
forget in all places, at all times, and under all cir- 
cumstances, to bring to the front the national pro- 
hibition movement After Bro. Gault had finished 
his work at Humboldt he left Bro. Stoddard was 
true to his calling, and in consequence of his faith- 
fulness in exposing the evils and dangers of these 
secret powers, I wag ntopped in my temperance work! 
This opened my eyes for the first time as to the neces- 
sity and great importance of this double funeral. 
For it is plain to my mind if these common and gen- 
eral foes to God and all mankind cannot be put out 
of the way, or forever set aside, separately, then we 
must lay them side by side, in one and the same 
open grave. Sometimes I think it will cost less to 
bury them at one time. 

You will be anxious to know just how that thing 
went at Humboldt In few words you will see this 
is a very plain case. On Saturday 5th, at 3: 30 p. m., 
Bro. Stoddard and I went on the same spot where I 
had stood months before and preached on the public 
square in Humboldt, when the city officer told me 



Dear Cvnosure: — The vacation in Washington 
is practically ended. The cool weather has lu-ought 
the return of most of the absent pastors and of the 
President, who with renewed vigor settles down to 
official work. Meanwhile there have been influences 
at work that have taken no vacation. There has 
been, and still is, a large amount of crime, mainly 
of violence, and attended with resistence to lawful 
officers — crime that is largely chargeable to the liq- 
uor traffic, which has shown no signs of abatement. 
Some drinking men have been brought under 
Christian influences and reformed, but the number 
of intoxicated persons that are to be met in the 
street is as great as at any former period. To the 
credit of our police force it may be said that there 
is a general disposition to enforce the law; so much 
so that the liquor dealers are endeavoring to strike 
back. They have formed a "protective association," 
raised funds, appointed a committee, and made an 
appeal to the District Commissio.iers against the po- 
lice. They say that a wrong done to anj' one of the 
liquor dealers must be resisted as though it had 
been done to all. They have, it is said, sought the 
services of Senator Voorhees to defend their cause. 
Exactly what their greviances are, it would be diffi- 
cult to say, unless it is that their violations of law 
have not been openly winked at It is a matter of 
congratulation that the issue between the liquor deal- 
ers and the people is fairly made up, and that the 
party that defies both human and Divine law, is, as 
in the slave-holders' rebellion, to take the aggressive. 
Any restriction of the traffic will be regard as an in- 
vasion of personal rights and the simple question is 
shall the traffic be perfectly free or wholly prohib- 
ited? 

Quite in contrast with this is the course of some of 
our officials in reference to Sabbath observance. It 
has been the law and custom here to have all public 
buildings closed on the Sabbath. They are closed 
to all citizens, but there is an evident desire to con- 
ciliate a powerful organization which has votes if 
not principles. The following trom the Evening Star, 
of Monday, the 7th, illustrates this: 

Visiting Knights of Labor.— Four bundred Knights of 
Labor of Richmond visited Washington yesterday, arriving on 
a special train at four o'cIocIj. They were met by committees of 
the Washington Knights. They were entertained at Abner's, 
and subsequently escorted to the various points of interest aliout 
the city. At the request of Gen. Rosecrans, Architect Clarice 
opened the Capitol for their benefit. In the afternoon a recept- 
ion was held at Odeon Hall. During the visit a presentation 
was made of a gavel made from one of the pillars of the old 
Libby prison to District Master Worl<man Cousidine for use in 
D. A. No. 66. The visitors left for home at eight o'clocl^. The 
entertainment of the vieitors was in charge of a committee, com- 
prising Messrs. Fallon, De Akers, Myers, Bisbee, Diclison, Her- 
bert, Traylor, Fay, and Powell, of the Washington assembly. 

Let friends of the Sabbath take note. 

The religious interest at the Central Union Mis- 
sion at 909 Pennsylvania avenue, N. W., still con- 
tinues with unabated interest So also do the street 
meetings at Market place, as well as those conduct- 
ed by the Salvation Army. Numerous conversions 
of persons of all classes are of frequent occurrence. 
Many who have heretofore been victims of intem- 
perance or promoters of other iniquities are now 
earnest and faithful in Gospel work. 

Nor has the influence on professed Christians been 
less marked and beneficent Sectarianism has dis- 
appeared from among those who have devoted them- 
selves to this work. Theatre-going, tobacco-usino', 
and lodgery are having a decided set back, and the 
joy of believers in legitimate Christian work is tak- 
ing the place of those entertainments that are earth- 
ly, sensual, and devilish. The Salvation Army has 
just commenced labor in Alexandria, and there is 
every indication of a wide-spread and blessed work 
of grace. May the Lord hasten it in his time. 

H. II. HiNMAN. 



A GOOD TEMPLAR DEFENCE. 

Madison, Wis., Sept 14, 1885. 
Editor Christian Cynusure: — Some kind friend 
has sent me a copy of your paper of the 10th inst, 
for which I am very thankful. I have read it with 
great care, and with much of its contents I find my- 
self in hearty sympathy. I was especially pleased 
with the spirit of an article from J. T. Sutor, en- 
titled, "Have Charity; ' but with the letter of your 
correspondent, 0. F. Lumry, from Lake Bluff, I have 
considerable fault to find. In speaking of Good 
Templars' day at Lake Bluff, he says, "We failed to 
hear the great speech of the occasion by the pope of 



L*^ 



September 24, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



the order, John B. Finch. I use the term 'pope' be- 
cause it was put into my mouth by that patriarch 
and worshiper of the order, Hon. Samuel Hastings, 
of Wisconsin. He said that he himself had for 
some years filled the same position, and that there 
was but one man in the whole world who held a like 
position, and that Was the pope of Rome." 

There are various ways of stating a fact. A fact 
may be repeated so as to convey a very different im- 
pression from what was intended by the person who 
first stated it. If a politician who wished to make 
a point against a political opponent had made the 
statement quoted above, I would have thought noth- 
ing of it, but I am surprised to find it in a paper of 
the character of yours. If your correspondent had 
stated in what connection i made the comparison 
between the head of the order of Good Templars 
and the "pope" it would have been fair, and no one 
could have found fault. There are a great manj' 
things about the "pope" that are very objectionable 
to the readers of your paper, and in reading the 
statement of your correspondent no one would know 
but I claimed or at least admitted that there were 
things about the head of the order of Good Tem- 
plars that were equally objectionable. I was speak- 
ing of the extent of the order, that it existed all over 
the civilized globe, and that unlike any other organ- 
ization that I knew of, with the exception, perhaps, 
of the Romish church, it had one central head; that 
the authority of that head was the same in Europe, 
Asia, Africa, Australia, as it was in the State in 
which he resided. As you know all about the order, 
you know what that authority is: j'ou know that it 
is as unlike that of the "pope" as light is from dark- 
ness. 

Your correspondent then goes on as follows: "The 
claims of the order as set forth contradicted my dis- 
tinct recollection of facts. We were given to under- 
stand that the fundamental principles of the order 
were total abstinence for the individual and prohibi- 
tion for the State. How this accords with the fact 
that there are lodges, and so far as I can learn a 
large number of them, in which almost none of the 
members vote for prohibition, and members go 
through the ceremonies so drunk that they cannot 
stand erect without leaning on others, I cannot quite 
understand." 

He then goes on to make some statements about 
a lodge in Medusa, N. Y., where the members failed 
to live up to the principles of the order as I stated 
them. Suppose some infidel should reason thus: 
"The claims of the Christian church as set forth by 
its friends contradicted my recollection of facts. 
We are given to understand that the fundamental 
principles of the church are supreme love to God 
and equal love to man. How this accords with the 
fact that there are churches, and so far as I can 
learn a large number of them, in which almost all 
the members show by their conduct that they have 
no real love to God or to their fellow men, T cannot 
quite understand." Suppose he should then refer 
to some particular church where the spirit of dis- 
cord and hate had been specially manifest; would 
you regard this as conclusive evidence that the 
Christian church was false to its fundamental prin- 
ciples and unworthy of the support of all good peo- 
ple? Is. the reasoning any better in the one case 
than in the other? 

I know nothing of the particular lodge to which 
your correspondent alludes, but I am well aware 
that there are many lodges and many Good Tem- 
plars that are no honor to the order with which they 
are connected, and it is quite likely that just such 
things as your correspondent describes may some- 
times have been witnessed, but if so they are very 
rare exceptions. I have been connected with the 
order nearly thirty years. I have been its chief ex- 
ecutive officer six years, and I have visited lodges in 
all parts of the world: in nearly every State and 
Territory in the United States; in Canada; in Eng- 
land, Ireland, and Scotland; in the Sandwich Is- 
lands; in Australia, New Zealand, and Tasmania; 
and I never saw or heard of any such doings as 
your correspondent describes. 

Your correspondent quotes Dr. Jewett and others, 
and adds his own testimony to prove that the "se- 
cret orders" have "choked it" — the temperance 
cause — "to death;" and he "charitably" expresses 
the hope that "when professed temperance men now 
make statements contrary" to this that "they are 
not acquainted with the recorded facts." 

I am certainly thankful for his "charity" as I 
shall need it, as I do deny most emphatically the 
truth of the statement that the Good Templars at 
least have "choked the temperance cause to death." 

Pardon me for a few words of personal history. 
I came upon the stage of life during the Anti-ma- 
sonic excitement. I was a resident of Philadelphia 
while Joseph Ritner was Governor of the State of 
Pennsylvania, elected, as you are aware, as an Anti- 



mason. I was a thorough Anti-mason in all my 
views and feelings. So strong were my objections 
to secret societies that when the Sons of Temper- 
ance came into existence I refused to unite with the 
order for several years, and was finally induced to 
waive my objections because in the place I then re- 
sided — Geneva, in this State — there was a bitter 
fight in progress between the friends of temperance 
and the liquor dealers, and I found all the active 
friends of the cause were in this organization, and 1 
could not fully co-operate with them unless I united 
with the Division. Some few years after I united 
with the Good Templars. I have been connected 
with the order ever since. I think I know as much 
about the order and its workings as any man living. 
I have some standing as a Christian, as an anti- 
slavery man, as a Sabbath-school man, as a temper- 
ance man, and as a friend of everything that will 
honor God and promote the welfare of my fellow- 
men, and I wish to place behind the statement I am 
about to make all the influence that the r'ecord of 
more than fifty years of active life in trying to do 
good has given me. The statement is this: That 
during the nearly thirty years I have heeri connected 
with the order of Good Templars, while I have known 
of an immense deal of good having been accom,plished 
by the organization, 1 have never known of any harm, 
or evil resulting from it. 

Instead of this order having had a tendency to 
"choke the temperance cause to death" it has kept 
it alive in thousands of localities where had it not 
been for this order the cause of temperance would 
have had no advocates. There are thousands of 
localities where the "secret temperance order" is the 
only temperance organization that has ever had an 
existence. In the city where I now reside, within 
my recollection various attempts have been made to 
start open organizations. The Good Templars have 
always attended the meetings, and have continued 
to do so until they were about the only ones who 
did attend, when they have concluded it was not 
worth while for them to keep up the two organiza- 
tion«3. 

I belong to the same Good Templars' lodge with 
which I first united. For nearly thirty years it has 
kept up its weekly meetings, as regularly as a 
church keeps up its weekly prayer meeting. More 
than two thousand persons have taken the pledge of 
total abstinence at its altar, the large majority of 
whom have faithfully kept it. From what I know 
of the character and surroundings of these persons, 
I am safe in saying that had it not been for the 
lodge, scores, if not hundreds, of them would have 
become intemperate, and many of them would have 
filled drunkards' graves. This lodge has furnished 
speakers for scores of public temperance meetings 
that have been held in the various churches in this 
city, and has paid all the expenses attending these 
meetings. It has circulated a large amount of tem- 
perance literature that has had much to do in creat- 
ing the sentiment in favor of prohibition that now 
exists in our city. There are hundreds of other 
lodges in this State, and thousands in other States, 
that have done a similar work. The order in this 
State, besides circulating a large amount of temper- 
ance literature, besides the local work done by its 
hundreds of lodges, has kept constantly in the field 
during the first ten or fifteen years from two to five 
able lecturers who have been employed in advocat- 
ing the principles of total abstinence and prohibi- 
tion, and in this way has mainly been created that 
strong public sentiment in favor of prohibition that 
resulted in polling 13,225 votes for the prohibition 
party the first time it was fairly in the field in this 
State. And yet the order is charged with "choking 
the temperance cause to death." 

Look at the other great temperance organizations 
of the present day: the National Temperance Society 
and Publication House, which has done and is now 
doing such a grand work. The idea of this organ- 
ization was started in the brain of a prominent Good 
Templar — James Black of Pennsylvania; and Mr. 
Black had more to do in bringing the organization 
into existence than any other one man, and to-day 
the president and at least thirty or forty of the vice- 
presidents of this organization are members of 
"secret temperance orders." 

Take the National Prohibition party: it earliest 
members were connected with the order of Good 
Templars. It may be said to have had its birth in 
this order, and a large number of its most active 
workers are to-day members of this order. 

In the number of your paper before me there is 
an article in which twenty -five objections to Free- 
masonry are given. Admitting that these objections 
are well founded, not one of them will apply to 
Good Templary. But one objection can really be 
made to the order of Good Templars, and that is 
that it is "secret." Now, Mr. Editor, you know all 
about this order, and I ask you in all kindness, what 



does its secrecy amount to? But little more than 
the secrets of any well-regulated family. There are 
no oaths to be taken by persons joining this organ- 
ization. There are some simple forms and cere- 
monies, entirely innocent in themselves, distasteful 
it may be to many of us, and yet attractive to many 
others. These innocent forms and ceremonies, the 
simple password by which the lodge protects itself 
from intruders, have a strong influence in keeping 
the lodge in existence, and thousands of lodges have 
lived and worked for many years, and accomplished 
good, while without these things they would not 
have held together a single year. I have never 
known any harm to result from this feature of the 
organization, while I have known it to be the means 
of accomplishing immense good. 

Yours truly, Samuel D. Hastings. 



HOW THE MASONS DIDN'T 

LAY THE CORNER STONE OF THE COURT HOUSE IN 
LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 



Seeing in a late number of the Cynosure an ac- 
count of the laying of the corner-stone of Du Page 
county, [Knox county is probably meant. Ed.] Illi- 
nois, I feel moved to tell how the lodge was prevent- 
ed from airing their prof unctory ceremonies in Adri- 
an, Mich., last year. 

It had been given out that the Masons were to be 
invited to lay it, and many Anti-masons feared it 
might be the case. A vigorous ])rotest was pre- 
pared and put in circulation for use in case of ne- 
cessity, but as it turned out there was no occasion to 
make use of it. The following article I had clipped 
from a newspaper sometime pTeviouslj', and laid it 
aside in case it might be needed. About the time 
the invitations to the Masons would be extended it 
was sent to the Adrian Times, the leading paper in 
the county, and printed. It ran as follows: 

THAT CORNEE-STONE. 

Apropos of laying the corner-stone of the new court house the 
following clipped from the BufEalo Telegram is in point , and is 
respectfully submitted : 

"What mechanical or other facilities for laying corner-stones 
of public monuments does the order of Freemasons enjoy which 
other societies do not possess? Of what constitutional connec- 
tion with government, National, State, or Municipal have these 
fanciful gentlemen, that they come forward on every occasion of 
the sort to monopolize the ceremony? What national signifi- 
cance was there in their performance of this function at York- 
town, lately? In the abstract, perhaps, corner-stones of whatso- 
ever kind are as well laid with their mummery as with any other 
mummery, and, indeed, would be as well laid without any mum- 
mery at all, by the mechanic and his helper who do the real 
work. But why should one organization have the monopoly of 
the business? Ts Freemasonry the established religion 
of the United States? Or are the secrets of it the 
real esoteric and mysterious abracadabra of American pol- 
itics? Who or what do they represent? Certainly not the whole 
people, for a majority of people are not Masons, and millions of 
people, whose rights and opinions are as sacred as those of their 
fellow citizens look upon their organization with disfavor. 

Why don't the others have a chance to air their good clothes 
and their profunctory ceremonies now and then in a country 
where all persons, all sects, all societies and orders are supposed 
to be free and equal before the law? We haven't the least idea 
but that the Grand Hoki Poki of the Knights of Pythias or the 
Supreme Right Worthy High Monkimonk of the Noble Order of 
Red Men, or the Supreme Right Valiant and Noble Grand Emi- 
nent Commander of the Knights of Honor, could handle a trow- 
el on such an occasion with as much mechanical skill, ceremoni- 
al unction, and brayery of ribbons and feathers and aprons and 
gew-gaws, as the Supreme Right Worthy Grand Eminent What- 
ye-call-'em of the Free and Accepted Masons. Give 'em all a 
chance." 

It fell like a bombshell in the camp of the enemy. 
Men who were not Masons carried it around the 
streets to read, and it produced a general laugh at 
the expense of the fraternity. It provoked discus- 
sion, and that of all things Freemasonr}* hates. They 
had not discretion enough to conceal their chagrin, 
but fell into a rage declaring they would have noth- 
ing to do with the laying of the corner-stone in anj" 
way. This, of course, was what our friends desired, 
that the order should keep their hands off, as an or- 
der, from a building erected for the administration 
of justice and paid for by the whole people. 

However, the people came together on the day ap- 
pointed in large numbers. An able and appropriate 
address was delivered by Chief Justice Cooley of 
the Supreme Court of Michigan, and the corner- 
stone was as duly and truly laid, and much more so, 
than it could have been by a company of men who 
are bound together by oaths with death penalties at- 
tached to extricate each other from any difficulty in 
which they may be engaged whether right or wrong. 
I was much interested in the article which ap- 
peared in a recent number of the Cynosure contain- 
ing extracts from the reports of the Grand Lodge of 
Michigan for 1864. I showed the article to a friend 
who is a high Mason and asked him if he knew any 
thing about it. He replied he did for he was present 
at the time. I remarked to him that eternal vigi- 
lance seemed to be the price of Masonrj- as well as 
of liberty, in view of the facts narrated in the ex- 
tracts referred to. With a sort of knowing look, 
{ he said, "Masons are not so much different from 
other men." 



/] 



^m 



THE CHRlfe'TIAl^^ CYKOBtTHE,. 



SEPTEiMBER 24, 1885 



The tiiorough oxpositiou ot Freemasonrv by 
bretliren Konayne ami St<xUiard in AiUiau, a few 
years ago, has not l>een lost work. While the lodge 
may. and perhaps does, find congenial soil in a cer- 
tain element in society, it is not jK>pular. Its obli- 
gations and horrible penalties do not strike the pulv 
lie mind as l^ing i-onsistent with our American in- 
stitutions. This is seen in the obligations of the so- 
ciUleil minor se<.ret orvlers, where a simple form is 
deemevl sullicient. But the light should and must 
Ih? kept steadily turnetl on the secret ordei-s. great 
and small, in onler that error ma^j^ be desti-oyed and 
the right prevail. C. QrioK. 



HOW CALLEST THOU MR GOOD. 



Albion, Iowa, Sept. 12, 1SS5. 
Kditors CvsosiRE: — In reading J. T. Sutor's 
article, "Have Charity." the same idea occuned to 
me that always does when I read such articles: I 
never 'X^nld understand such reasoning, ''That it is 
not men but the institution that he opix>ses." Men 
comix>se the institution. I cannot see how to op- 
pose an institution and not oppose its members. 1 
have watchetl the working of Freemasonry for more 
than forty years. I never have known any good 
men or man who were adhering Masons. At the 
death of Morgan all gooil men left the lodge, and 
Freemasonry was tried, condemned by public senti- 
ment and abandoned by its votaries, given up as a 
by-gone, wicked institution for over twelve 3-ears. 
Since then Masonry is made up wholly of bad men. 
All intelligent men know or may know what Mason- 
ry is, and whoever goes up into a lodge and has his 
clothes taken oU' except his shirt, blindfolded, with 
a rope around his neck, and there on his knees with 
the Bible in his hands repeats, "Furthermore do I 
promise and swear," and lives under those blasphe- 
mous oaths, is not what I call a good man. I care 
not whether he is a minister or not, there is no ex- 
cuse for him. In my opinion, Mr. Sutor's article is 
too mild for the occasion. I was eighteen years old 
when Morgan was murdered, and, as all men except 
Masons were then, am a radical Anti-mason. 

A. C. MOFFATT. 



1 will add, we aim to nuike the Vangmird an expo- 
nent of all Bible truth and Christian practice. 1 
have had the experience of sanctilication for some 
years. It saves me from all sinful dressing, enno- 
bles my womanhtxxl and helps me to live solely to 
glorify God. Yours in Christian fellowship, 

Anna Abrams. 



PITH AND POINT. 



A SPIRIT-ENLIGHTENED LETTER. 



A WOKD TO BliOTUEU U. C.^NNINO. 

In my article on tobacco I recognized Christians with 
serious faults, as scores of Scripture texts do. It is need- 
less to quote. See Gal. o: 1; 1 Cor. 3: 1. If faultless 
saints call us to an account for "intimatiDg" that believ- 
ers may possibly stray so far from God as to use tobacco, 
or even to join the lodge, we must cite them to the very 
manj- tests that intimate the same thing, in both Testa- 
ments. "Every branch i?i me that beareth not fruit," etc. 
John 15: 2. Explain this in harmony with the teaching 
of the Scriptures and you'll justify my language in said 
article. This shall not go into a controversy with my 
consent, on the question whether a Christian can sin and 
yet be a child of God. Now, dear brother, if you have 
a penchant to shoot again I'll simply "stand lire, — Na- 

TH.VX CaLLENDEK. 

THE MOKALITY OF THE rn.UlISEES. 

In the paragraph on the "Popular Explanation of the 
idea of Masonic Paganism," by Elder Browne, {^Cynosure 
of August 27), I read, "'The men who treated Christ 
worst were the most moral men of the day." Then "But 
Christ said of them (the Pharisees) that they outwardly 
appear unto men to be righteous, but within are full of 
dead men's bones and all uncleanness." What! such men 
the most moral men of their day? What is morality but 
a conformity to the moral law ? But what does the moral 
law require but a right state of heart? Is not the moral 
character found alone in the intention? Nol The men 
who treated Christ worst were the most immoral men of 
their day. As is said immediately before, "the picture is 
good, but is of the devil." There was no morality about 
those men. Their character was hypocrisy. The "lec- 
turers" must take care "how they hear" and "what they 
hear." — A. H. Sprlngstein, Warren, Mich. 

Note. — The idea of the speaker concerning the moral- 
ity of the Pharisees was doubtless that in their profession 
and in the ordinary estimation of the Jews the Pharisee 
was the most moral man of the time. See the parable of 
the Pharisee and publican and Christ's injunction to obey 
them, Matt. 23: 2. 



great evils of secrecy, but to God's infinite power to help 
them in the combat with it. The blindness with which 
the Syrian host was smitten in answer to Elisha's prayer 
was a mental hallucination rather than literal blindness. 
To use the New Testament phrase, "their eyes were hold- 
en" that they did not know Elisha or guess that he was 
leading Uiem the wrong way. So it is often through 
prayer that confusion enters the counsels of the wicked, 
and they plan measures which defeat themselves. 
LIGHT FROM THE WORD. 
What are the Christian's foes? Eph. 6: 12. Do good 
men need praying for? Luke 22: 33. 



A'angcard Office, St. Loui.s, Sept. 8, 1885. 

Editor Christian Ctnosure: — We have come to 
know you through the Cynosure, which is regarded 
by our band as a standard exchange. As we read it 
our hearts are knit to yours in the one work of strik- 
ing at the root of so man}" organized evils which 
threaten individual and national life and liberty. The 
Cynosure should have a world-wide circulation. It 
would Ije more beneficial in the family than so man}- 
tame religious papers. Man}' good, well-meaning 
{x.'ople are ensnared for want of knowledge. For 
this reason, I believe the fund for the gratuitous dis- 
tribution of your paper is as necessary as a mission- 
an,- fund to send men and women to heathen lands. 
We shall soon be a heathen land and in worse than 
heathen darkness, having rejected the light of the 
Bible, unless we destroy these anti-Christian organi- 
zations. 

The action of the G. A. E. at their late national 
meeting, regarding observing of Decoration Day on 
the Sabbath of 18815, should make every lover of 
God's law or even civil law, spring to his feet in de- 
fence of so vital a principle. Our help is in God. 
Christian people must take action against such an 
outrageous defiance of law and the consciences of 



BIBLE Lessons. 



FOURTH QUARTER. 

STUDIES IN THE KINGS AND PROPHETS. 
LESSON I. Oct. 4, 1S85.— Elisha at Dothan.— 3 Kings 6; S-33. 
GOLDEN TEXT.— Fear not: for they that be with us arc 
more than they that be with them.— 3 KiuKsti: 16. 
\Opeii the Bible aiid read the fcs.swt.l 

COMMENTS ON THE LESSON BY E. E. FLAGG. 
1. The invisible shield, vs. 8-16. The Syrian king, 
bathed in all his military plans by the supernatural knowl- 
edge of Elisha, turns his mind to getting possession of 
the prophet's person; and the servant of the man of God, 
going forth early in the morning, probably on some do- 
mestic errand, is paralyzed with fear to see an armed host 
surrounding the little city of Dothan, whose inhabitants 
would without doubt surrender up his master to save them- 
selves from massacre. This great host is a picture of 
what St. Paul calls the principalities and powers of this 
world — the vast anti-Christian force constantly arrayed 
against the individual believer, especially those who, like 
Elisha, are reformers, setting themselves against the evils 
Christian citizens. In the zeal of prohibitionists, of their times. The rum traffic is a great host. A busi- 
this .^iabbath principle must not be trampled upon or ' ness in which nine hundred millions are annually invest- 
God will not prosper. Here is the danger, men and ' ed must be a mighty foe with which to contend. But the 
women take in so little of the work U) be done, see ' j^^igg o^gj. jg jn ^any respects more to be dreaded. It 
only one of the monster's heads and in their zeal to , ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ l^^ve less knowledge of it and 

less for the harm it does; but above 



strike that off give him an opportunity to grow strong i , 

in other parts. We need to take in the whole work. 1 *^°°^^'^"''°"y .^^'"^ . .u v. , - • i , 

For this reason, the American platform commends ^"> '' '« "^^^ '"^^^^^ °^ ''^^ '^"^''' "" ^"^^'''f '^^'^'^. "^ 
itself to eve^^■ Christian mind, and must ultimately ^^Ise worship with that malignant spirit of persecution 
come l>efore the people. The wfuAe truth must be inherent in all false religions. There never was a time 
kept before the i>eople. This is indeetl a warfare, when the foes of Christ's cause were so numerous, so pow- 
and "we contend not with flesh and blood." It is sin erful or so crafty, But let us not be discouraged. For 
arrayed against holiness. God's government on earth ' every chariot of iron which the enemy may bring against 
is defied by the devil. "In the name of the Lord of us God has a chariot of fire, for every spirit of evil em- 
hosts, the God of the armies of Israel" we must rally ' bodied or disembodied, an angel in immortal panoply, 
our forces and unitedly move to battle under his ' jj^g ^^jy reason why so many Christians dare not speak, 
leadership. "The battle is not ours but the Lord's." I j. ^^^ ^^ ^^te their convictions is because their eyes 
Praise the Lord for the privilege of being in the < 
front ranks for the truth. You know it was said of | 
those men and women "who through faith subdued i 
kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises , 
* * out of weakness were made strong, waxed val- 
iant in fight, turned to flight the armies of the aliens, 
of whom the world was not worthy," that they with- 
out us "should not be made perfect" Praise God. 
I love, as Whittier says, the 'tumult of (he truth." 



have never been opened to see that they might have for 
their defenders all the armies of heaven, if their weak 
cowardice did not stand in the way. 

2. r/ie power of prayer, vs. 17-23. The blindness 
of the church to great moral and spiritual evils would 
trouble us less if we would remember this truth:— that 
saints sometimes need praying for as much as sinners. 
Ministers need to have their eyes opened not only to the power.— Todd 



"Warred against Israel." The war between the king- 
dom of Israel and the kingdom of Syria, which had been 
closed by the battle of RamothGilead (1 Kings 23: 3) 
and the death of Ahab (1 Kings 22: 35), was followed 
by an interval of three or four years of imperfect peace, 
during which the kings of the two countries were on 
terms of partial friendship (2 Kings 5: 5); but raids by 
marauding bands still continued (2 Kings 5: 3). The war 
now commenced. The first operations, however, were 
not conducted by large armies. The raids were made on a 
larger scale, and under the direction of the king of Syria 
himself. Not meeting with any adequate resistance, the 
armed parties made incursions into the very heart of the 
kingdom of Israel, and ventured withm a few miles of 
Samaria, the capital. They were not strong enough, how- 
ever, to undertake any sieges or engage in any pitched 
battles. Their object was plunder, and, if possible, to ob- 
tain possession by stratagem of the person of the King of 
Israel. — Todd. 

' 'The king of Israel sent to the place .... and saved him- 
self there;" i. e., he took care there. He sent spies to the 
place in order to ascertain if Elisha had given correct in- 
formation and wise counsel and he saved himself by ob- 
serving the counsel of the prophet and not passing through 
that locality. — Whedom. No one has ever regretted that 
he followed the divine advice of a man of God; on the 
contrary, many have thus been saved from ruin. — Limge. 
"And one of his servants said." This is supposed by 
some to have been Naaman, the healed leper, whose mar- 
velous cure had made him regard the prophet as almost 
omniscient. — Tayler Lewis. 

"Elisha . . . telleth . . . the words that thou speak- 
est in thy bed-chamber." Tremble with fear, ye obstinate 
sinners, because all is bare and discovered before his eyes, 
and shudder at the thought that the veil behind which ye 
carry on your works does not exist for him! All which 
ye plot in your secret corners to day ye will find to mor- 
row inscribed upon his book, and however secretly and 
cunningly ye spin your web, not a single thread of it shall 
escape his eye! — Krnmmacher. 

"■They that be with us are more than they that be with 
them." We need not suppose that Elisha saw the angelic 
host of which he here spake; He only gave utterance to 
the conviction of all God's saints when the world perse- 
cutes them (comp. Ps. 34: 7; 55: 18; 91: 11; 2 Chron. 32: 
7, etc.). God, they know, is on their side; they need not 
fear what flesh can do unto them. His angels, an 
innumerable host, are ever guarding those who love him. 
— Cook. The prophet speaks not of a casual event, but 
of something continued and always true in the providence 
of God. — Lewis. 

"Behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots 
of fire." The mountain was the hill on which Dothan 
was situated. The Syrian army surrounded the hill at its 
base, so that escape seemed impossible. But between the 
surrounding army and the prophet the whole space was 
filled with these fiery symbols of God's protecting hosts. 
They encompassed the prophet as a bodyguard, and of 
course protected him from the enemy on every side. So 
Christ spoke to Peter in his anxiety of twelveJegions of 
angels he could have for a guard. (Matt. 20: 53) . 

"Elisha prayed unto the Lord." Elisha's act was not 
merely a piece of goodnature and magnanimity; it was 
rather a prophetical act, in the strict sense of the words, 
which had no other aim than to glorify the God of Israel. 
Not for his own sake did Elisha pray Jehovah to smite 
the Syrians with blindness, but in order that he might 
lead them to Samaria. The thanks for their surrender 
into the hands of the king were due, not to him, but to 
Jehovah. Jehoram was to learn once more to recognize 
the faithfulness and might of Jehovah, and to be con- 
vinced that there was a prophet in Israel (chap. 5: 8). 
from the fact that these dangerous enemies were deliv- 
ered into his hands without a blow. On the other hand, 
Benhadad and the Syrians were to learn that they could 
not accomplish anything, with all their cunning plots, 
against the "prophet that is in Israel" (ver. 12), and 
much less, against him whose servant and witness this 
prophet wa.B. —Lanye. 

"And he smote them with blindness." This is not the 
usual Hebrew word for "blindness," but is a compound 
word, a thing not common in Hebrew. One part resem- 
bles the ordinary word to blind; the other is from a quite 
difEerent root, meaning to shine. The resulting idea 
would be that of roruscation or dazzling; and the whole 
would den ate visual bewilderment, hallucination, rather 
than total loss of sight The Syric renders it by a word 
denoting spectres, swimming vision, full of false images; 
and this would seem to suit the place exactly. — Tayler 
Lewis. It would have been a difficult matter for Elisha 
to have conducted a large force of blind men, with their 
horses and chariots, by the rough and hilly roads of that 
country, eleven miles, to Samaria. The blindness was a 
mental bewilderment which disabled them from recogniz- 
ing Elisha, or understanding where they were or what 
they were about, and put them wholly in the prophet's 



September 24, 1885 



THE CE^ISTIAN CYNOSimE, 



ANTI-MASONIC LEGTUREBS. 

Genekal Agent and Lectueeb, J. P. 
Stoddard, 221 West Madison street, Chi- 
cago. 

H. H. Hinman, Willimantic, Conn. 
State Agents. 

Illinois, Geo. T. Dissette, Cynosure of- 
fice. 

Indiana, S. L. Cook of Albion 

Mich., A. H. Springstein, Warren. 

Missouri, M. N. Butler, Burlington June. 

Minn., J. P. Richards, care Prof. Paine, 
Wasioja. 

New York, W. B. Stoddard, Dale. 

Wisconsin, Isaac Bancroft, Monroe 

Kansas, Robert Loggan, Clifton. 

Degree Woekehs. — [Seceders.] 
J. K. Glassford, Carthage, Mo. 

D. P. Rathbun, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Other Lecturers. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
N. Callender, Thompson, Pa. 
J H. TImmons, Tarentum, Pa 
J. H. Balrd, Templeton, Pa. 
T. B. McCormlck, Princeton, Ind. 

E. Johnson, Dayton, Ind. 

H. A. Day, Williamstown, Mich. 

J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 

A. Mayn, Bloomington, Ind. 

J. B. Cressinger, Sullivan, O. 

W. M. Love, Osceola, Mo. 

A. D. Freeman, Downers Grove, 111 

E. Mathews, Spring Arbor, Mich. 

Wm. Fenton St Paul, Minn. 

E. I. Grlnnell, Blairsburg, Iowa. 

Warren Taylor, South Salem, O. 

J. 8. Perrv, Thompson, Conn. 

C. F. Hawley, Wheaton, 111. 

J. T. Michael, New Wihnlngton, Pa. 

8. C. Kimball, New Market, N. H. 

8. G. Barton, Breckinridge, Mo. 

Joel H. Austin, Goshen, Ind. 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

E. Bametson, Jackson Valley, Pa. 

Wm. R. Roach, Pickering, Ont. 

11 4. Flchardp, Brighton, Mich. 

R. J. Williams, Winnebago City, Mion. 



A Wonderful Woman, 

A Wonderful Life, 

AND 

A Wonderful Book. 

Laura S. Haviland is a quiet, gentle, 
unassuu ing Quaker woman, 76 years of 
age, yet\ gorous, wi»o has had a remark- 
able career of usefuiiess, and has now 
given to the world a remarkable history 
of her "Life Work" as a teacher, at an 
early day, of the colored refugees in 
Canada and in Michigan, and in other 
States, as a traveler down South in the 
guise of a "berry picker," helping out 
into freedom many slaves; as a nurse and 
preacher to the sufferers in hospitals dur- 
ing the war; and with Gov. St. John and 
Flizabeth Comstock, relieving the desti- 
tute and suifering refugees in Kansas, 
etc. 

Her book is neither fiction nor found- 
ed on fiction, but is an interesting narra- 
tion of facts of a most thrilling charac- 
ter, as every one will find and testify who 
will get and read her book, now on sale 
at the Cynosure office, 221 W. Madison 
St, Chicago, 111. Price, cloth, $1,75; 
half Russia, $2.25. 

A WOMAN S VICTORY; 

OR 

THE QUERY OF THE LODGEVILLE 
CHURCH 



BY JENNIE L. HARDIE. 

This simple and touching story which 
was lately published in the Cyno- 
sure is now ready for orders in a beautiful 
pamphlet. It is worth reading by every 
Anti-mason —and especially by his wipe. 
3tet it and take it home to cheer the heart 
of your companion who may desire to do 
something for Christ against great evils, 
but is discouraged from making any pub- 
lic effort. Price, fifteen cents. Ten 
for a dollar 



The American Party. 



First Nomination for President at Oberlin, 
Ohio, May 23, 1872. 

Platform Adopted at Chicago, June 38, 
1873. 

Name Adopted at Syracuse, N. Y., June 3, 
1874. 

presidental candidates : 

1873— Charles Francis Adams and Joseph L. 
Barlow. 

1876— James B. Walker and Donald Kirkpat- 
rick. 

1880— J. W. Phelps and Samuel C. Pomeroy. 

1884— J. Blanchard and J. W. Conant nomi- 
nated; the former withdrawing, Samuel C. 
Pomeroy was nominated. Both nominees with- 
drawing, the support of the party was generally 
given to John P. St. John and William Daniel, 
candidates of the Prohibition party. 

NATIONAL committee. 

F. W. Capwell, New York ; ./. A. CoHauU Con- 
necticut; U. O. Paiiw, Minnesota; G. W. Nee- 
dcU, Missouri; E. D. Bailev, District of Colum- 
bia (Ex. Com.) James Kennedy, California; 
Robert Hardie, Dakota; J. F. Galloway, Flori- 
da; L. N. Stratton, Illinois; Israel Hess, Indi- 
ana; J. N. Norris, Iowa; H. Curtis, Kansas, S. 
A. Pratt, Massachusetts; H. A. Day, Michigan; 
E. Tapley, Mississippi; S. C. Kimball New 
Hampshire; Kobert Armstrong, New Jersey; 
E. A. Foldstrom, Nebraska; J. M. Scott, Ohio; 
Wm. H. Pruett, Oreeon; A. M, Paull, Rhode 
Island; J. W. Moss, West Virginia; M. R. Brit- 
ten, Wisconsin. 

AMERICAN PLATFORM. 



adopted at CHICAGO, JUNE 30, 1884. 

Viewing with deep concern the corrupt and 
unsettled condition of American politics, and 
witnessing with alarm the fearful prevalence of 
caste and clannishness by which our citizens 
are being arrayed in hostile bands, working se- 
cretly to compass political ends, a method di- 
rectly and powerfully tending to increase cor- 
ruption, to destroy mutual confidence, and 
hasten disruption and bloodshed ; and having 
no hope of adequate remedy for these evils 
from existing parties, and believing the foun- 
dation of a party based upon the fundamental 
principles of the Declaration of American In- 
dependence, both inevitable and indispensable : 

We, therefore, a portion of the American 
people, believing with our fathers that we have 
our rights and liberties, not from men or par- 
ties, but from God ; believing in the Christian 
marriage, and not in Mormonism; believing in 
the religious democracy of the New Testament, 
and not in the despotism of the lodge ; believ- 
ing, also, with our Scotch and English ancest- 
ors, that; civil government, though ordained in 
God, is "founded in nature, not in grace," and, 
therefore, that all have equal civil rights ; while 
we abhor the idea of enforcing religion or con- 
trolling conscience by human laws and penal- 
ties as calculated to make hypocrites, not 
Christians, and savoring of the days of priest- 
ism, the fagot and the stake, we at the same 
time as firmly believe that atheism and priest- 
craft are twins and both alike foes to human 
liberty and welfare. We further most firmly 
believe that a government without God has 
none but lynch power, and is destitute of all 
legitimate authority to maintain civil order, to 
swear a witness, to try a criminal, to hang a 
murderer, to imprison a thief ; and while we 
consider government without God as a mere 
usurpation, we regard all religions and wor- 
ships invented by men, and so having no high- 
er than human origin, as mere swindling impo- 
sitions and cheats. We believe in peace and in 
national arbitration as a means of perpetuating 
it; yet we as profoundly believe that the 
bravery and blood of our soldiers have bought 
us the peace which we enjoy, and we honor 
the memories of the dead and will be just to 
'he claims of the living; and we take up and 
prolong the strain raised by the women of this 
country: "For God, and home, and native 
land," and trust that this beautiful and patri- 
otic motto will soon be not only echoed by their 
voices, but sustained by their votes. 

We, therefore, solemnly adopt and present 
the following, as containing a brief synopsis of 
the principles of our government, by which we 
intend to be governed in casting our votes. We 
hold : 

I. That ours is a Christian and not a heathen 
nation, and that the God of the Christian Scrip- 
tures is the author of civil government. 

3. That the Bible should be associated with 
books of science and literature in all our edu- 
cational institutions. 

3. That God requires, and man needs a Sab- 
bath. 

4. We demand the prohibition of the impor- 
tation, manufacture, and sale of Intoxicating 
drinks. 

5. We hold that the charters of all secret 
lodges granted by our Federal and State Legis- 
latures should be withdrawn, and their oaths 
prohibited by law. 

6. We are opposed to putting prison labor or 
depreciated contract labor from foreign coun- 
tries in competition with free labor to benefit 
manufacturers, corporations or speculators. 

7. We are in favor of a revision and enforce- 
ment of the laws concerning patents and inven- 
tions; for the prevention and punishment of 
frauds either upon inventors or the general 
public. 

8. We hold to and will vote for woman suf- 
frage. 

9. That the civil equaUty secured to all 
American ci'izens by Articles 13, 14 and 15 of 
our amended National Constitution should be 
preserved inviolate, and the same equality 
should be extended to Indians and Chinamen. 

10. That international difEerences should be 
settled by arbitration. 

II. That land and other monopolies should 
be discouraged. 

13. That the general government should fur- 
nish the peopl* with an u&pl» and lousd cur- 
rency. 



13. That It should be the settled policy of the 
government to reduce tariffs and taxes as rap- 
idly as the necessities of revenue and vested 
business interests will allow. 

14. That polygamy should be immediately 
suppressed by law, and that the Republican 
party is censurable for the long neglect of its 
duty In respect to this evil. 

15. And, finally, we demand for the Ameri- 
can people the abolition of electoral colleges, 
and a direct vote for President and Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States. 



THE CHURCHES VS. LOD^JSRT. 

The following denominations are com- 
mitted by vote of their legislative assem- 
blies or by constitution to a separation 
from secret lodge worship: 

Adventists (Seventh-day.) 

Baptists — Primitive, Seventh-day and 
Scandinavian. 

Brethren (Dunkers oi' German Bap- 
tists.) 

Christian Reformed Church. 

Church of God ^Northern Indiana El 
dershlp.) 

Congregational — The State Associations 
of Illinois and Iowa have adopted resolu- 
tions against the lodge. 

Disciples (in part.) 

Friends. 

Lutherans — Norwegian, Danish, Swed- 
ish and Synodical Conferences. 

Mennonites. 

Methodists — Free and Wesleyan. 

Methodist Protestant (Minnesota Con 
ference.) 

Moravians. 

Plymouth Brethren. 

Presbyterian — Associate, Reformed and 
United. 

Reformed Church (Holland Branch.) 

United Brethren in Christ. 

Individual churches in some of these 
denominations should be excepted, in part 
of them even a considerable portion. 

The following local churches have, as a 
pledge to disfellowship and oppose lodge 
Worship, given their names to the follow- 
ing list as 

THE associated CHTJRCHES OF CHKIST. 

New Ruhamah Cong. Hamilton, Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Cong. Sandford Co. Ala. 

New Hope Methodist, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Congregational, College Springs, Iowa. 

College Church of Christ, Wheaton, 111. 

First Congregational, Leland, Mich. 

Sugar Grove Church, Green county. Pa. 

Military Chapel, M. E., Lowndes county, 
Miss. 

Hopewell Missionary Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Cedar Grove Miss. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Simon's Chapel, M. E., Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Misa, Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Wiss. 

Brownlee Church, Caledonia, Miss. 

Salem Church, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

West Preston Bantist Church, Wayne Co., Pa. 

OTHER LOCAL CHUKCHES 

adopting the same principle are — 

Baptist churches : N. Ablngton, Pa. ; Meno- 
monie, Mondovi, Waubeck and Spring Prairie, 
Wis.; Wheaton, HI.; Perry, N. Y.; Spring 
Creek, near Burlington, Iowa; Lima, Ind.; 
Constableville, N. Y. The "Good Will Assocl- 
ton" of Mobile, Ala., comprising some twenty- 
five colored Baptist churches; Bridgewater 
Baptist Association, Pa. ; Old Tebo Baptist, 
near Leesvllle, Henry Co., Mo. ; Hoopeston, 111 ; 
Esmen, 111. ; Strykersville, N. Y. 

Congregational churches : 1st of Oberlin, O. ; 
Tonlca, Crystal Lake. Union and Big Woods, 
lU. ; Solsbury, Ind. ; Congregational Methodist 
Maplewood, Mass. 

Independent churches In Lowell, Country- 
man school house near Linden wood, M,"Tengo 
and Streator, lU. ; Berea and Camp Nelson, Ky ; 
Ustick, 111. ; Clarksburg, Kansas ; State Associ- 
ation of Ministers and Churches of Christ In 
Kentucky. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS 

Who depend on voluntary contributions 
of Christian people in whole or in part 
for their support: 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

Eli Tapley, Columbus, Miss. 

J. F. Galloway, Okahumka Florida. 

Wm. Hazenburg, Cape Town, S. 
Africa. 

A. D. Zaraphonithes, Andros, Greece. 

C. B. Ward, Secunderabad, India. 

The Evangelists associated with Rev. 
John G. Fee, of Berea, Ky. 

Contributions for either of these breth 
ren may be forwarded through the Treas- 
urer of the N. C. A. Please designate 
to which one such funds shall be sent. 



i^Be&den ordering goods, or making 
Inquiries concerning articles advertised 
in this paper, will confer a favor by stat- 
ing that they saw the advertisement in 
Ibe CHRISTIAN OTNO&URB. 




N. C. A. BUILDING AND OFFICE OF 
THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 
221 WEST MADISON STREET, CHICAGO 

NATIONALCHHISTIAN AS80CIATI0H 

President.— F. W. Capwell, Dale, N.Y. 

Vice-president — Rev. W. T. Meloy, 
D.D., Chicago. 

Rec. Sec'y.— W. I. Phillips. 

CoR. Sec'y and Geneal Agent. — J. 
P. Stoddard, 221 W. Madison st., Chicago. 

Treasurer.— W. I. Phillips, 221 W. 
Madison Street, Chicago. 

Directors. — Alexander Thomson, M 
R. Britten, John Gardner, J. L. Barlow, 
Joseph Travis, William Moerdyk, 0. F. 
Lumry, M. C. Ranseen. L. N. Stratton, 
Thos. H. Gault, C. A. Blanchard. 

The object of this Association Is: 
"To expose, withstand and remove secret 
societies, Freemasonry in particular, and othet 
anti-Christian movements, in order to save the 
churches of Christ from being depraved, to re- 
deem the administr? "ion of .lustice from per- 
version, and our r''p hlican government from 
corruption." 

To carry on this work contributions are 
solicited from every friend of tne reform. 

Form of Bequest. — I give and bequeath to 
the National Christian Association, incorpo- 
rated and existing under the laws of the State 

of Illinois, the sum of dollars for the 

purposes of said Association, and for which 
^e receipt of its Treasurer for the time being 
'tiaU be sufficient dlscharae. 

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

President. — Rev. S. Collins, D. D 
Secretaries. — Rev. 8. A. George. H. 
L. Kellogg and M. N. Butler. 

state AUXnJABY ASSOCIATIONS 

Alabama.— Pre8.,W. A. McAlplne; Sec, Q 
M. EUiott; Treas., E. Flshel, all of Selma. 

California. — Pres., L. B. Lathrop, HoUls- 
ter ; Cor. Sec, Mrs. U. P. MerrtU, Woodland ; 
Treas., C. Ruddock, Woodland. 

Connecticut.— Pres., J. A. Conant, Willi- 
mantic; Sec, Geo. Smith, WUlIman tic; Treas., 
C. T. CoUIns, Whidsor. 

IL1.IN0IS. — Pres., Wm. H. Chandler, Dover ; 
Sec, H. L. Kellogg; Treas., W. I. PhUlIps, 
CwMsure office. 

Indiana.— Pres., William H. Figg, Reno- 
Sec, 8. L. Cook, Albion; Treas., Benj. Ulsh 
Silver Lake. 

Iowa. — Pres., Geo. Warrington, Birming- 
ham; Rec. Sec, A. W. Hall, College Springs ; 
Cor. Sec, T. C. Maughlln, Washington; 
Treas., J. A. Laird, Wayne. 

Kansas.— Pres., J. P. Richards, Ft. Scott; 
Sec, W. W. McMUlen, Olathe; Treas., 8. 
Alexander, Linden. 

Massachus tts.— Pres., 8. A. Pratt; Sec, 
Mrs. E. D. Bailey ; Treas., David Mannlng,8r. ; 
aU of Worcester. 

Michigan.— Pres., D. A. Richards, Brighton ; 
Sec'y, H. A. Day, Williamstown; Treas., 
Geo. Swanson, Jr., Jackson. 

Minnesota. — Pres., E. G. Paine, Wasioja 
Cor. Sec, W. H. McChesney, Fairmont; Rec. 
Sec'y, Thos. Hartley, Richland; Treas., Wm. 
H. MorriU, St. Charles. 

Missouri.— Pres., C. J. Kephart, Avalon 
Treas., WlUlamBeauchamp, Avalon; Cor. Sec. 
M. N. Butler. 

Nebraska.— Pres., 8. Austin, Falrmount, 
Cor. Sec, W. S. Spooner, Kearney; Treas 
J. C. Fyc 

New Hampshire.— Pres., A. H. Lamprey, 
Laconla; Sec, 8. C. Kimball, New Market; 
Treas., (■'eoge Crosby, Gilford Village. 

New YoR.i.— Pres., F. W. Capwell, Dale; 
Sec'y, John Wallace, Syracuse; Treas., M. 
Merrick, Syracuse. 

Ohio.— Pres., Wm. DUlon, Dayton; Cor 
Sec, J. P. Lyt^c, Sago; Treas., J. M. Scott, 

Alexandria. . ^ ,, ^ ,. 

Pennsylvania.- Pres., A. L. Post, Mon- 
rose; Cor. fsec, N. Callender, Thompson; 
Treas., W.B. BertelSiWIlkesbarre. 

Vermont.— Pres., W.R. Laird; Sec, C. W. 
Potter. 

Wisconsin.— Pres., J. W. Wood, Baraboo; 
Sec, W. W. Ames, Menomonle: Treas., M. R 
Britten, Vienna. „ „ „ 

Wbst Virginia.— Pres., D. B. Tumey; Sec, 
John Bosley, Grafton. Treas.., H B. Higglns, 
Petroleum. 






*Uf^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYKOStrKE. 



September 24, 1885 



The Christian Cynosure. 

Editors. 
i. BLANCHAKD. HENRY L. KELLOGG. 

GHICAaO, THTJRSDAT, SKrTEMliER 04, 18S5. 



The New Part v. — Why aro Americaus, and os- 
ptX'ially The AmeriojH, so mcnlest about urging the 
name "Ameriean" for the new party? "rrohibition," 
■■Reform." etc., are not lit names. The reform ouoe 
a'.-complisheti such a name becomes obsolete: as 
would the name AlKilition part}- after slavery ceased. 
But Amen'o.in is national and permanent; besides 
l^eing euphonious and populai^. American means 
Christian, because it was. in 1620. the name of "a 
Christian c^ommonwealth." It also means anti-secret, 
because our Constitution excluded 'oniers," "titles 
of nobility,"' etc.. all that makes a secret lodge. It 
means a Sabbath, for the Puritans kept Sabbath in 
the woods on journeys. It also means prohibition. 
In the Pequot war there were but two quarts of rum, 
kept strictly for medicine. ■■The Know Nothings" 
knew something, viz., how to choose a popular name; 
and in several States they swept the old parties like 
a cyclone. Joseph Cook wishes -'success to the 
principles of the American part\-." Why shrink 
from the name? 



TEE UNITS D BRETHBBN COMMISSION. 



Dr. L. Davis has a long article in the Telescope 
against the United Brethren Commission, and a re- 
ply by the editor. The case, as we understand it, is 
this: By their constitution the fathers of thatchurch 
undertook, as they had a right to, to keep themselves 
utterly clear of secret societies, and so declared that 
there should lie no members of them in their com- 
munion. If any joined them, they put themselves, 
by that act. out of the churcL One would think 
none but scoundrels and caitiifs would join or attempt 
to remain in such a church in contempt of such a 
law. However, they did. They did more. Strong 
with their immense backing they joined, and under- 
took to control the churches which they debased. 
They boldly defied the constitution and law, and held 
a c-onvention at Dayton, under the eaves of the Tele- 
scope printing house, in which their leaders declared 
that the rule excluding secret societies should never 
be enforced. They were voted down by an immense 
majority at Lebanon, Pa., some twelve or sixteen 
years ago. but this made no difference. They did 
not rely on support in the church, but on lodge-power 
outside, and on brass and craft inside. 

The c-onstitution provides that that instrument 
"can not be changed" but '-by request of two-thirds 
of the whole society." The proper way to change it 
therefore, was to submit the question, change or no 
change, to the conferences. But knowing a change 
would not be voted by those who do the paying and 
the praying, the leaders, in the Fostoria General 
Conference, which could be more easily manipulated 
by the money power, than could those who pay the 
money, moved and carried a "Commission of twen- 
ty-seven'' to revise both creed and discipline, ex- 
pecting by this extemporized snow-plow, to drive or 
drag the whole church through the cold draft of the 
lodge. The Cynosure would not accept or argue such 
a fraudulent issue. The meaning and intent of the 
move is to let in or keep in the swarming secret or- 
ders. They should be assailed as burglars are, not 
by argument and law but by discipline. 



EON. SAMUEL D. EASTINGS. 

We call the special attention of our readers to Mr. 
Ha.sting's letter in this number of the (Jynosure. 
The candor and ability with which it is wTitten, and 
the writer's long and sustained endeavor to use Good 
Templarism for the glorj- of God and the gowl of his 
fellow-men, entitle him to our gratitude and respect. 
The leadership of the new party, now struggling in- 
to birth and being, must consi.st of such .spirits as 
Mr. Hastings. Nor is it strange that good men like 
him should be drawn into lodger}-, as the fox draws 
the hen to his mouth, by biting his tail and whirling 
round and round, till she bec^jmes giddy with gaz- 
ing, falls from her high roost, and is taken off to his 
den. 

"Aaron, the saint of the Lord," was a capable 
man and true patriot. Yet he fell into a fatal false 
worship, precisely as Mr. Hastings fell into Templar- 
ism. It was popular. Aaron .saw that the people 
were •'««< on mitchief" he undertook to utilize the 
fashionable cattle- worship of Eg}-pt for the true re- 
ligion: made them a calf, and told them to wor- 
ship the true God, who had brought them from 
Egypt, by calf-worship. But the experiment ended 
in a Good Templars' frolic and an Odd-fellows' dance. 



This was doubtless •'distasteful" to Aaron, as Mr. 
Hastings admits there are some things in his lodge 
"distasteful to many of us." though "attractive to 
others." A priest professor in College Seminaire, 
Quebec, said to the writer, in view of some 
distasteful ceremonies, "You and I don't need 
them, but those people do." Christ gave no such! 
It is not pleasant to point out the errors and mis- 
takes of good men: but it is kindness to do so. 
These are some of Mr. Hastings' mistakes: 

1. He says their secrecy "is little more than that 
of every well regulated famih\" 

But this is a terrible mistake. The Templar 
promises to conceal, never to "reveal anj' of the 
private work of this order," and also that he "will 
sacredly keep and never improperly reveal" * * * 
"anything pertaining to this (council) degree." A 
family which should promise and never reveal "anj- 
thiug pertaining" to it, would be social pirates. 

2. Again, Mr. Hastings says: "There are no oaths 
to be taken by persons joining this organization." 

But every one who joins, must say, in the still and 
solemn night, and surrounded by scenic judicial 
forms, and confronted b}- the Chief Templar in full 

reg.alia: "I, , in a full belief in the existence 

and power of Almighty God, and in the presence of 
these witnesses, do solemnlj-, and understandingly 
promise that I will not reveal any private work of 
this order;" and that, "in all things I will yield a 
cheerful obedience to all the laws, rules and usages 
of this order." How a gentleman of Mr. Hastings' 
intelligence, having administered the above thou- 
sands of times, can say, "There are no oaths to be 
taken by persons joining this organization," can only 
be accounted for by the fact that the lodge-god liter- 
all}- and morally "blinds the minds" of those who 
practice these worships. 

3. Again, Mr. Hastings — "I was a thorough Anti- 
mason in all my views and feelings." And he goes 
on to say that he refused for a time to join the Sons 
of Temperance, but finallj' joined them at Geneva, 
Wis., because there was no other temperance organi- 
zation there, and there was a bitter fight. So Mr. 
Hastings put on the livery of the lodge, to wit., se- 
crecy, regalia, (i. e., royal ornaments) degrees, titles, 
etc., etc. Note that he had not repented of his 
Anti-masonry and the support of the good Gov. Rit- 
ner. He joined the secret lodge-system, as Saul 
joined the priesthood, as a war measure. Saul's ex- 
cuse for practicing uncommanded worship was pre- 
cisely the excuse of Mr. Hastings for joining a se- 
cret lodge at Geneva: "The Philistines will come 
now upon me, I forced myself, therefore, and offered 
the burnt offering." (1 Sam. 13: 9.) Had Mr. Hastings 
forgotten his Bible? its testimony that uncommand- 
ed worship is demon-worship, from Moses to Paul? 
(Deut. 32: 17; and 1 Cor. 10: 20). He joined a tem- 
perance lodge and became "brother" with its mem- 
bers, non-professors, deists, and all! He pronounced 
a creed at the door which purposely omitted Christ, 
to take in his enemies. He stood before an altar of 
Jeroboam, got up for political success. He vowed 
to conceal he knew not what, and to obey laws and rules 
whicu he had never heard read, and to give grips of 
brotherhood and signs of friendship and fellowship 
to strangers whose charaters he could not know, 
and the whole sealed by the prayer of a chaplain, 
who might be an infidel or deist, so far as the rules 
of the lodge were concerned, for any full member 
was eligible! No wonder such things were "distaste- 
ful" to a Christian like Mr. Hastings. He left his 
Saviour with his dog and hat in the ante-room or at 
the door of the lodge; and every thing, the whole 
make up of the performance was a religious inven- 
tion, "commandments of men." And though Christ's 
name was foisted into a few of the prayers inside, 
Christ said of it, "In vain do ye worship me, teach- 
ing for doctrines the commandments of men." 
How could Mr. Hastings forget that all such things 
are devil's get>ups? called in the Bible, "abomina- 
tions," spiritual "whordoms," "nothings," "vani- 
ties," etc.? 

"But," Mr. Hastings replies, "may not churches 
and their members Vjecome corrupt?" Yes; but a 
lodge is itself a corruption, a man-invented, got-up re- 
ligion; and to compare such a thing to a church or 
family is to insult God who made both. It is to 
c^;mpare an unmarried courtezan to a pure wife; "the 
great whore that sitteth upon many waters," to the 
"Bride, the Lamb's wife." No wonder such a thing 
is "dista-steful" to men like Mr. Hastings, Dr. Charles 
Jewett and John B. Gough. Mr. Gough said to the 
writer,"They got up a great procession at Baltimore, 
and fixed me out in thetv^>ggery of the Templars. It 
was, I believe, the only time I ever wore it. As I 
rode along in the carriage, I looked down on myself 
and saw what a figure I cut. I stripped that horse- 
collar off, rammed it under the seat (suiting the act- 
ion U) the word) and have never had one on since." 
It was "distasteful." So was it to the sainted Dr. 



Marsh and to Dr. Jewett, whose estimate of the 
orders may be read in another column. 

Now, suppose we are "bigoted," "mistaken," "fa- 
natic." Suppose we have misunderstood our Bi- 
bles; and that men maj' manufacture "altars, ' "rites," 
and worships ad libitmn, without displeasing God. 
Whj' should such "distasteful" things be forced up- 
on such men as Mr. Hastings, Finney, Moody, and 
Dr. Crosbj^, who dislike them? Suppose thatthegray 
uniform had been so "attractive" to some Union sol- 
diers that the}' had insisted on_putting it on, and 
yet would stay in our regiments, and fight on the 
side of legitimate authority. Why, they would have 
been cashiered, shot, or drummed out of camp, and 
served them right. Now look on a procession of 
Masons and Good Templars side by side, and he 
must have a practiced eye who can tell which is 
which; and the "degrees" and "titles" of both are 
alike "Grand" and "Great Grand." If every Good 
Templars' lodge on earth were dead to-day, neither 
St. John, the Prohibition candidate, nor Van Fleet, 
of the Lever, the National Prohibition organ, would 
"turn their hand over" to bring them to life. Of 
this any one may satisfy themselves by asking them. 
Why then force us to serve God in the livery of the 
devil; or else split the temperance ranks, or join in 
a vote for candidates nominated by men who do 
their temperance planning behind tyled doors where 
the sons of light cannot enter? Hon. Henry Wil- 
son, forced as was Mr. Hastings to join a secret 
temperance lodge, told the writer, that he straight- 
way moved to publish their ritual and become an open 
society. Why not emulate the wisdom of that wise 
politician and honest man? 

The American party was for prohibition before 
the Prohibition party was born. We have made a 
steady growth. We voted for St. John, the Prohi- 
tion candidate, when we had none of our own, be- 
cause he was, in sentiment, with us. But we can- 
not, must not, vote with a party which shuts its se- 
cret lodge-doors in our faces; nor ought any Ameri- 
can to do so, while he knows that Mason-Prohibi- 
tionists are sworn brothers of Mason-distillers, brew- 
ers, and saloon keepers. We have ample head- 
quarters paid for in Chicago and in Washington, D. 
C., sufficient to "sow the United States knee-deep" 
with prohibition publications. Let there be a na- 
tional mass convention called in the interest of pro- 
hibition, inviting only such as will go for open work. 
Let us merge the Lever with the American and send 
Mr. Van Fleet to join Prof. Bailey in Washington, 
and request Fred. Douglass to stump the United 
States for us. What says Mr. Hastings to this? 



SUPREME LODGE, SUPREME FOLLY. 



The general meetings of two secret societies in this 
city during the past week have given the discerning 
public some idea of the weakness of human nature 
for mouthing great titles and parading before men 
with vaunting but shallow dignities and pomp. 
When the treaties of our government had opened the 
ports of China to our trade, our plain and wholesome 
American taste ridiculed the "supreme" titles used 
by the Emperor, the "Supreme Son of the Sun." But 
this folly, which was once among us attributed to 
pagan ignorance and superstition is now the height 
of fashion among our little imitations of Masonry. 

The "Knights and Ladies of Honor" met in the 
Leland Hotel, and the programme included "lake 
excursions, visits to the Exposition, carriage drives 
to various points of interest, visits to the parks, thea- 
tres, panoramas, and receptions to the visitors." If 
there was any time left, business was in order. The 
installation of the officers of the "Supreme Lodge" 
was held in Central Music Hall, and as is always the 
case when that hall is open to the public, a crowd was 
out, and the attractions of the occasion were in- 
creased by plenty of music. The installation ser- 
vices were not long, nor was there any parade of re- 
galia, a simple badge supplying the place. But all 
the officers were sworn by oath, asking "God to help 
me in my supreme pledge of honor," taken with hand 
and forefinger raised. An able speech was made by 
the new "Supreme Protector" in which he compared 
his society to the Saviour of the world who came in 
the appointed time to help mankind, so this order 
was raised up to supply a great need and perform a 
great work in society. His reference to Christ was 
not so reverent as we have here made it appear. The 
meeting h,^d no prayer, but a chaplain sat among 
the officers. The objects of society were not very 
prominently set forth. Its business is life insurance, 
but as this is done without the supervision of the 
State perhaps they preferred to say little on this mat 
ter. The sociality of the order was one of its grand 
est developments and eloquent sentences were wasted 
in telling how by its magic power strangers are made 
friends, without any other reason for the relation 
than membership in this order. Such sociality and 



September 24, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSTTEE. 



friendship needs very much indeed the power of a came thicker and faster, hitting me many times and 
Supreme lodge and plenty of Supreme officers to Bro. Stoddard, and their rotten contents flying over 
make it valuable. I all, even the ladies! Come to learn the facts, the may- 

The "United Order of Ancient Templers" is a or, they say, is a Mason. It is the opinion of all, I 
body with both temperance and life insurance draw- , think, we would have had no trouble if we had said 
ing its triumphal chariot. The "ancient"-ness of this nothing on secrecy. If there is anything in the lodge 
body is so great as to overpower the skeptic. Its , that is working harm in the family, the church and 
numbers have been doubled this year by a union of I the nation, is it not the duty of all true reformers to 
the order of Rechabites, a temperance society with expose it as we do the evil of the saloon? If, in our 
some 4,000 members in the Eastern States. Its "Su- 1 exposing the evils of these oath-bound armies, our 
preme Temple" meetings are not secret, as the sec- 
retary or "Supreme Recorder" informs us, and as 
an earnest of its temperance principles, Mr. J. B. 
Hobbs, of this city, the candidate of the American 
and Prohibition parties for Governor of this State 
last year, was invited to make a public address. 
Mr. Hobbs made a very good, business-like address 
to the "Supreme Temple," which provided him a fine 
audience of seven Ancient Templars, one reporter, 
and one representative of the public. His apology 
for accepting the invitation to speak was that he was 
always ready to give his testimony in favor of pro- 
hibition; which is a good rule, but has its exceptions 
like every other. 

The seven who were taking care of this "Supreme 
Temple" were men evidently of little education, 
well pleased to be called "supreme" this or that, 
plain men of the working class, who might make 
themselves useful if filled with a Christian zeal in a 
home or church circle, both in promoting temperance 
and providing for the poor; but their present effort 
resembles a school-boy mimicry of the larger orders 
in which they could never hope to hold high office. 



— The Detroit Freemason, from which the Cynosure 
has quoted several times pointed articles on the re- 
ligion of the lodge, in turn quotes our note of last 
week on John A. Logan, without note or comment. 
Let the work go on. 

— Secretary Stoddard was last week attending the 
Swedish Lutheran conference at Paxton, 111., and the 
Illinois Synod of the United Brethren at Gibson, ex- 
pecting to be able to present the claims of our re- 
form upon the churches in both places. This week 
he has appointments in Genoa, III, for the 22nd and 
23rd. ■ 

— We regret not to have received earlier a notice 
of a State Prohibition convention in Iowa, to be held 
at Cedar Rapids on Wednesday of this week. The 
convention is to be similar to that held last year, 
which formed a union of the American and Prohi- 
bition electoral ticket, and its purpose to help make 
the present laws against liquor operative, which is 
evidently not the purpose of the Republican party as 
expressed in its platform. 

— The Swedish Lutheran pastors are becoming 
more interested in the work of the N. C. A., and 
welcome our workers to speak among their people. 
The General Agent has arranged for a course of lec- 
tures in the church of Pastor H. O. Lindeblad, at 
Moline, to begin on the 28th inst. This is a large 
and influential congregation, and the pastor feels 
the importance of having his people faithfully in- 
structed and thoroughly informed on the secret 
lodge system. 

— Bro. W. B. Stoddard, before he goes to Ohio to 
begin work for the State Association, is spending a 
little ticje in Chicago. His first report will be read 
with interest elsewhere. Will not all the Cynosure 
readers in the city assist him by a cheering word if 
you meet him, and especially give him the names of 
any who might be benefitted by a conversation, and 
possibly become active friends of the reform. 



liberty or free speech is to be taken away, and on 
the top of that we are to be pelted with rotten eggs, 
it is time we understand our business and prepare for 
action accordingly. 

For the encouragement of the true and faithful, in 
and out of Humboldt, I have this to say. First, one 
thing is now settled: God ordained that house to be 
buiit at Humboldt as a reform temple. The room up 
stairs will hold beds enough to accommodate all the 
reform workers that may be needed at any one time, 
in exposing every evil way and work, the men of 
God remaining in the temple all night. No danger 
from eggs! as these secret men (they say) do their 
work in the night. Hence let all the workers of re- 
form remember this earthly tower of the Lord where 
the righteous may run in and be safe. The State of 
Nebraska can thank God for a headquarters of gen- 
eral deliverance. 

Second, I have always felt that good eggs were 
strengthening to me on the inside. I find there is 
nothing but the grace of God that can excel a plas- 
ter of spoilt eggs on the outside, in reform work! 

Third, I have been told that in anti-slavery times 
one bad egg applied to an abolitionist, would hatch 
out ten j'oung ones! I have come to this conclusion, 
that our facilities for hatching these bad eggs are 
better than in days of old. I think I have turned 
out in about one week ten of the tallest reform chick- 
ens, or rather reform workers, of any now in the 
field. I think I can safely count on one hundred as 
the product of the Humboldt convention. Hence, 
the friends at Humboldt can thank God and take 
courage. If one can accomplish so much, what will 
be the result of all the faithful workers in that conven- 
tion? R. Smith. 



REFORM NEWS {Continued from J^th page.) 

drink, hence I felt the way would be all open for us 
both to talk on prohibition sure. Just as I was open- 
ing the subject the same officer came up and said: 
"You must get a permit to speak here, or 1 will ar- 
rest you." Said I to him, "You then have gone back 
on your temperance principles?" "No," said he, "it 
is the order of the mayor." We went to see the 
mayor, but could not find him. All this time I could 
hear music in the air. I am about sixty-four years 
of age. This is the first time in the United States 
and Canada I was ever stopped speaking for Jesus. 
That night we went again to the People's meeting- 
house, the only place in town, I am told that can en- 
dure sound doctrine on all these reforms, and, by 
the way, it is a grand house for reformers to work in, 
as all know who have seen. Bro. Stoddard in his 
address was plain and kind, and not severe, as he 
might have been under the circumstances, and still, 
on our way home, five of us walking along by father 
Bissell's light — three men and two ladies — the first 
any of us knew an egg struck me by the side of my 
head which most knocked me down, then the eggs 



FROM THE GENERAL AGENT. 



CHLOROFORMING THE UNITED BRETHREN. 



Gibson, HI., Sept. 18, 1885. 
The Central United Brethren Conference is in ses- 
sion here. Bishop Castle presiding. Forty-five minis- 
ters and twenty-eight lay delegates answered at roll 
call yesterday afternoon. Reports from different 
circuits vary somewhat, but on the whole indicate 
much work and some success. I had hoped to ob- 
tain a hearing on our reform, but after conferring 
personally with the Bishop and other leading mem- 
bers am going away without speaking. Apparently 
the policy is to keep this question of secrecy out of 
the conferences, and avoid any discussion through- 
out the bounds of the Connection. I am told that 
the U. B. church is "passing through a crisis," and 
hence moderation, prudence, and wisdom are re- 
quired. But these statements are unquestionably 
true, but whether it is prudent and wise to keep silent 
or not is the question. The Publishing House and 
funds at Dayton and the church organ are directed 
and used by those who favor the "commission" and 
proposed "change", and furnish a ready means for 
reaching the membership; while those opposing the 
"commission" and proposed "change" are greatly re- 
stricted in means and agencies for reaching the mem- 
bership in the churches. If the consideration of 
this question can be kept out of the annual confer- 
ences as now seems probable, the Telescope will have 
a whole year in which to manufacture a sentiment 
favorable to its own views and wishes in the matter. 
I do not say that the management of the publishing 
interests of the church would take advantage of their 
opportunity, but they certainly have the opportunity 
if disposed to use it, and ordinary men would be 
strongly tempted to make use of means so potent 
and easily controlled. Bros. Hoobler, Kretsinger 
and the veterans say the "Central Conference is loyal 
to the backbone," and will never yield its position on 
the secrecy question, and some favor the discussion 
in the conference, while the prevailing sentiment 
seems to be "keep this vexed question out of confer- 
ence if possible." Bishop Weaver is reported to me 
as having said, "Nine-tenths of the U. B. ministers 
and members are in favor of the law on secrecy as 
it stands." The senior bishop ought to know; and 
if he is even approximately correct, why should the 
majority concede to so small a minority the right to 
ignore this question or pass it silently by in their de- 
liberative bodies, especially when these annual gath- 
erings furnish the best if not about the only oppor- 
tunity for a free, full and personal expression of 



views. I speak as an "outsider," but not as a disin- 
terested party, for I have met so many of these good 
"Brethren" in their homes, on their circuits and in 
legislative and deliberative bodies, that m}^ sympa- 
thies have been warmly enlisted and my attachments 
have become verj' strong; but while endeavoring to 
be impartial in judgment, I must say that this silent 
policy is a mistake, or I am greatly in error as to 
what will be the outcome. Truth has no occasion to 
shun discussion. It is the "politic," the "scheming," 
the "artful," that seeks refuge in the cry "Let us 
alone!" 

Enquiring of a brother about the condition of his 
work this morning, he said, "The church in Decatur 
ought to be called the United Sisters in Christ, for 
the men are all in the lodges and seldom come to 
meeting." Another brother standing by remarked, 
"My folks are all Methodist, but I left that church 
because I would not fellowship the lodge, and now 
it seems as if the U. B. church was going to leave 
me to stand alone, but 1 will never compromise on this 
question." 

Father Kretsinger preached to a crowded house 
last evening, taking for his text the 2.3rd Psalm. 
The sermon, like the man, was brimful of piety and 
practical common sense. Father Kretsinger has 
read the Cynosure too long and carefully not to be 
sound on the lodge question. I have met here a 
daughter of the late Bishop Edwards who strongly 
resembles her father, and tells me she has inherited 
all his principles on radical reforms. She is very 
active and is here, as I understand, in the work of 
the Woman's Mission. Women with such princi- 
ples are needed as leaders in the aggressive work of 
the U. B. church. 

providential. 

The freight train on which I expected to reach 
Paxton was detained, and after waiting some time 
at the depot I returned to the conference room. 
The "Ghost of Banquo" was up and the feeling was 
intense over the following resolution: ^^ Resolved, 
That it is the sense of this conference that our mem 
bers should not join the G. A. R. or any secret so- 
ciety." The ayes and nays were called for and the 
Bishop submitted the question of taking such a vote 
to the conference. He made a few remarks and the 
secretary called the roll; 22 voting aye, and 30 nay. 
Rev. H. Stoddard, of Summerfield, explained his 
position as a born anti-secretist and loyal to the U. 
B. church, but he could take an Odd-fellow in one 
hand and a G. A. R. in the other and go to the com- 
munion, glorifying God; but he did not wish to vote 
and so was passed by. 



A DIFFERENT ATMOSPHERE. 

Paxton, Sept. 19 a. m. — The spacious auditorium 
of the Swedish church was well filled yesterday while 
I spoke 45 minutes, the time allotted to me before 
the conference. Close attention was given and, as 
far as I can judge good was done. 

A leading member of the conference remarked, 
when I was speaking of the Cynosure and the Na- 
tional Conference of churches, "We go slow on such 
things," which is true; but this I notice — they go, 
and not backwards, on reform questions. There was 
a good interest apparent immediately after my lect- 
ure yesterday, but on visiting the conference this 
morning, after the brethren had thought and consultr- 
ed and prayed over it, I found it had increased sev- 
en-fold at least. I arranged for a course of lect- 
ures at Moline, 111., beginning on Monday, the 28th 
inst., and could have made appointments for one or 
two months ahead, if I had been at liberty to do so. 
I had hoped to find a suitable place for holding our 
State meeting while at the U. B. Conference, but as 
I am disappointed in this and see nothing more that 
I can do here, I have decided to make an inspection 
of the field at Hoopeston and vicinity where I intend 
spending Sabbath. 

The Swedish Lutheran church here is numerically 
the largest in the place. It has a membership of 
440, and a Sabbath-school of 130. Their property 
held for church purposes is estimated at $15,000 and 
is kept in the most tasteful order. The audience 
room has a seating capacity of 1,000, and is furnished 
with a $1,200 organ. They pay their pastor $1,000, 
besides the use of a comfortable parsonage. They 
are a people of small means, but very industrious 
habits, and have attained to their present condition 
of competency by economy and application to busi- 
ness. Not a secretist of any order is allowed in 
their communion, and as the people become informed 
they are destined to be a power against the lodge in 
this city. The pastor has very kindly oflered his 
church to me for a course of lectures and promises 
a collection at the meetings in aid of our work. I 
purpose to accept the. invitation, and give the lect- 
ures at as early a day as possible. 

J. P. Stoddard. 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



September 24, 1885 



The Home. 



BEAUTIFUL WORDS. 



"Cast thy bread upon the waters; for thou shaJt timl it after 
manT dsvs." — K<\i. tt: t. 

'Mid the losses and the gains; 

"Mid the pleasures and the pains, 

'Mid the hoping? and the fears, 

And the restlessness of years. 

We repeat this passage o'er — 

Wo believe it more and more- 
Bread u;yiu the waters cast 
Shall be gathered at the last. 

Gold and silver, like the sands, 

Will keep slipping through our hands; 

Jewels, cleaming like a spark, 

Will be hidden in the dark; 

Sun and moon and stars wi\l pale, 

But these words will never fail : 

Bread upon the waters cast 

Shall be gathered at the last. 

Soon like dust, to you and mc, 
Will our earthly treasure be ; 
But the loving words and deeds 
To a soul in bitterest need. 
They wiU not forgotten be, 
They will live eternally— 

Bread upon the waters cast 

Shall be gathered at the last. 

Fast the moments slip away, 
Soon our mortal powers decay. 
Low and lower sinks the sun, 
What we do must soon be done ; 
Then what rapture, If we hear 
Thousand voices ringing clear — 

Bread upon the waters cast 

Shall be gathered at the last. 

— BajjtUt Weekly. 



A HIGHER TYPE OF PIETY THE GREAT 
IfEED OF OUR DAY. 



I 



[A paper read before the Ministerial Union of Philadelphia, 1884, 
by Rev. Arthur T. Pierson, D. D, and published by their un- 
animous request.! 

The first fifteen centuries of Christian history maj' 
l)e described by three words, formation, deformation, 
reformation. The deformation covers a thousand 
years, marked by putrefaction and petrifaction, or 
the loss of godly savor and sensibility. Heresy and 
iniquity; a papal system more disastrous than pa- 
ganism; ignorance, superstition and practical idola- 
try"; these are a few of the shadows that overhung 
the church till Protestantism was born. To-day, so 
prevalent are irreligion and infidelitj-, so suljtle is 
the charm of a worldly religiousness, that only evan- 
"■elistic activity keeps the church evangelical. 

Our church-life is undermined by worldliness. 
No line of separation from the world exists, except 
in the fact of church-membership. Our Lord bids 
us "keep ourselves unspotted from the world," i 
and "hate even the garment spotted with the flesh," 
because in close contact, not to saj- conformity, there 
is contagiov: a worldly spirit, caught bj' the church, 
infects and infests her whole life, and is fatal to spir- 
itual power. 

l^ot. conformed but transformed, are the conditions 
of true life and power. In how many disciples do 
we find them? Thousands, like Ananias, defraud 
the Lord of his dues; like Simon the Sorcerer, esti- 
mate spiritual gifts on a monc}' basis; like Demas, 
forsake Christ for this present world, or, like Dio- 
trephes, love pre-eminence. Our Lord, even at a 
marriage festival, did not lose his character as the 
Son of Go<l, but manifested forth his glory and won 
disciples to believe. Church members drop their 
character, a-s Christians, at the door of the gaieties 
of the world, as an Oriental guest shuffles off his 
sandals, and so mingle indiscriminately with the dev- 
otees of fashion and frivolitj-! 

The go*l of this world encloses our feet in his 
most ingenious snare, when he secures from the 
I>ord's disciples the recognition of his favorite be- 
guilements. Certain institutions have always been 
used by Satan to ruin souls, such as the theatre, 
opera, card-table, horse-race, and dance. The theatre 
appeals, in a pure-minded man, to a normal, histri- 
onic appetite; but as an institution, caters to our 
lower propensities, and cannot be sustained without 
ministering to vice. Booth himself sank .^] 50,000 
in New York City, in trying to establish a dramatic 
school for good morals! The theatre shows itself a 
putrid carcass by the drinking saloon, gambling sa- 
loon and brothel, the vultures that gather round it 
A game of cards may be innocent, but, for centu 
rieS; has been filthy with the defiling touch of gam- 
blers and pickpockets. The horse-race may attract 
as an exhibition of the beauty and speed of the no- 
blest of animals; but. as an institution, it is an open 
door to hell. The dance may be conducted by inno- 



cent maids :unl stainless men, but, as it exists in so- 
ciety, it deserves to be branded as -'lascivious." 

Soparatiou from the world there must be. The 
Koman soldiers, after a night's revel, at day-dawn 
put on the soldier's armor and became sober; so 
from the moment of conversion, the course of this 
world is to be put away as among the works of 
darkness, and the armor of light to be put on, never 
to be taken ofl'. Like Daniel in Babylon, we are to 
present a perpetual contrast to our surroundings, 
and be so isolated and insulated spiritually, to be filled 
and charged with the life of God. The New Tes- 
tament puts the heaviest stress upon an unworldly 
life. Yet in the church are a few decided lovers 
of God, thousands of decided lovers of the world, 
and thousands more trying to compromise between 
two principles and courses of life, as utterly at war 
as light and darkness. The bulk are not couseera- 
ted: they belong to the "worldly holy" or the 
"wholly worldl}-." Out of the normal Christians 
there may be "ten millions" who give evidence of 
regeneration! With millions more, there is a vain 
dependence upon a dead faith, or dead works, or con- 
nection with a state church, instead of the righteous- 
ness wrought in them b}- the Spirit 

Dr. Bice of "\'irginia, remarked that foreign mis- 
sions will not advance to anj^ great degree till there 
is a higher type of piety at home; it would not con- 
sist with the divine plan, to diffuse widely such a 
type of piety. In fact, such piety has but little dis- 
position to diffuse itself; it requires all its vitality 
and energy to maintain its present position; there is 
none to spare! 

"Four-fifths of the nominal membership of our 
churches add nothing to their real power; they are 
a dead weight or a positive hindrance to the ad- 
vance of the Gospel; they fill up the gulf between 
the church and the world, and break down the 
distinction between the truly regenerate and the 
enemies of God and the truth." How can we ex- 
pect God to permit rapid diffusion of a low grade 
of religious life! He rather selects the advance 
guard of Christians, to cany the cross into the 
enemies' country, and permits difficulties and dan- 
gers to face them, that turn back all but heroic 
souls. Hence, the type of piety found irl mission- 
ary churches is in advance of that at home. In 
proportion to laborers and means employed, the re- 
sults are three-fold as great as at home! Within 
eighteen months, 100,000 in India alone became 
identified with Christian communities; but we have 
to go into the heart of pagandom where a few Chris- 
tians, imbued with special consecration, are labor- 
ing, to find such results. In the very garden of the 
Lord, where the}^ are to be expected, no such har- 
vests wave! In the race for worldly treasure and 
pleasure; in the worship of mammon; in the loss of 
a vivid sense of the reality and verity of spiritual 
things; in the lack of power to prevail in prayer; in 
the absence of that grand concurrent witness of 
an unworldly life, more weighty than any testimony 
of the lips; we also lose all true power to go forth 
conquering and to concjuer! 

One startling fact "of our church life is the ab- 
sence of personal service in saving souls. Service 
seems lost sight of in salvation, which is itself 
sought with but feeble and spasmodic effort I have 
been wont to urge upon disciples a systematic seek- 
ing of souls, putting the question pointedly, "Do 
you know that you have ever been instrumental in 
leading one soul to Christ?" only to be met in hun- 
dreds of cases with the sad confession that there has 
been no effort put forth in that direction. 

One array of figures has often overwhelmed me. 
A simple calculation will show how rapid would be 
the conquest of the whole world for Christ, on the 
basis of one new convert, every year, as the fruit of 
the labors and prayers of every disciple. Upon this 
basis, if ths true followers of the Lord now num- 
ber only 30,000,000, the number of disciples in sev- 
en years would be 1,920,000,000. Our supposition 
allows to each child of God an entire year for the 
winning of each new convert; and yet within seven 
years we overtake the entire population of the globe. 
Take a more astounding proposition. Suppose but 
one truly godly man were now upon earth. Lot him, 
during this year, convert one other, etc.; at this sim- 
ple rate of geometrical progression, doubling the 
number every year, in thirty years the number of 
converts would be over one thousand millions. And 
yet, after 1800 years, the proportion of disciples to 
the present multitude of mankind is probably no 
larger than when Constantine ascended the throne. 
' Where are the marks of consecrated capital, of 
property acquired and administered by disciples as 
stewards of Got!? 

In the light of the New Testament, the question 
may be raised whether it is right for a disciple to be 
rich. Paul and James warn not only against dis- 
honest gains and selfish or sensual indulgences, but 



against the lust of accumulation; the curse of can- 
ker and rust which gathers about hoarded treasure. 
Moses turned his back tipou the three lusts, ambi- 
tion, appetite, and avarice, when, in one heroic re- 
solve, he forsook the court of Pharoah, the plea- 
sures of sin and the treasures of Egypt During 
Old Testament times the doors of the Gospel had 
not been thrown open to the whole world, and the 
avenues for the use of money, in workp of charity 
and mercy, were comparatively few and narrow. 
But now, with a thousand millions crying for the 
light of God, how can they who love Christ hoard 
wealth? Which ever way we look, the pleading hand 
of God confronts us, in the thousand demands for 
temporal and spiritual relief, ready to use every 
spare dime of the Christian world. How can disci- 
ples grow rich but b}' shutting their eyes and ears? 
I know one Christian man who spent for his own 
house, grounds, furniture, and ornamentation, five 
times as much as the American Board, in all its mis- 
sionary operations for a year. In homes of disci- 
ples the value of pictures, statues, silver plate, etc., 
more than exceeds all that the churches jointly give 
to spread the Gospel among the unsaved. 



TWO WATS—WHICH? 



One evening, in a parlor of a sutnmer watering 
place, the young people were dancing. One lady was 
not taking part in the exercise. "Does not your 
daughter dance?" asked another lady of this young 
lady's mother. "No," was the reply. "Why, how 
will she get on in the world?" "I am not bringing 
her up for the world," was the quiet answer. The 
j'oung lady is now a woman, and the influence of her 
consecrated life is felt in many of the Christian in- 
terests of a great city. But for what are you bring- 
ing up your daughters, dear mothers of other young 
girls? What aim have you for them? Are you 
bringing them up for the Lord or for the world? 
What are your dreams and ambitions for them? 
What do you want to see them become? Do you 
want them to shine in society, to "marry well," to 
live in wealth? Is that the vision that fills your soul 
when you think of them? Look on a little farther. 
Life is short Suppose 3'our dream is fulfilled — is it 
anything more than a dream? What lies beyond? 
The curtain is drawn, and there is the hushed cham- 
ber of death. What do you want for your child 
then? The curtain is drawn again, and eternity 
opens. What would your fond affection choose for 
her then? It is better to think matters of this kind 
through to the end. — Selected. 



A BOY OF YE OLDEN TIME. 



I have heard of a boy who lived long ago— 
For such boys are not found nowadays, you know— 
Whose friends were as troubled as they could be 
Because of a hole in his memory. 

A charge from his mother went in one day. 

And the boy said "Yes," and hurried away. 

But he met a man with a musical top 

And his mother's words through that hole did drop. 

A lesson went in ; but, ah, me ! ah, me ! 
For a boy with a hole in his memory ! 
When he arose to recite he was all in doubt; 
Every word of that lesson had fallen out. 

And at last, at last— oh, terrible lot ! 

He could speak but the two words, "I forgot !" . 

Would It not be sad, indeed, to be 

A boy with a hole in his memory? 



- Sel. 



THE USES OF INSECTS IN' GODS WONDER- 
FUL CREATION. 



We often talk about the plague of insects. They 
are often great plagues, but we must not forget that 
we owe insects a debt of gratitude as well. Only a 
very small portion of the insect world are noxious; 
the others are engaged in good work for us — some 
engaged in warring against the same insect foes that 
we war against, and the others in clearing away dead 
and injurious matters. On this last head, an Eng- 
lish scientific paper well says: 

"Insects are useful in destroying dead vegetable 
substances, which are even more pernicious to man 
than animals in the same condition; and not only 
the soft and succulent portions, but even the solid 
wood is' destroyed by them. In the immense forests 
of the tropics, the ground would be covered and new 
shoots be choked up by the ruins of trees which had 
fallen by accident or age, and which it would re- 
quire ages to disperse without the aid of insects. 
But no sooner is a tree fallen than one tribe of ani- 
mals cuts its bark to pieces, another bores holes in 
it in all directions; so that the moisture from dew or 
rain may stand, decompose, and soften. Others 
come in to eat off the parts that are softened, and so 
on till it is entirely broken up and scattered; and 



September 24, 1885 



THE CFJIISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



this is done with such expedition that they will in a 
few weeks destroy and carry away the trunks of 
large trees without leaving a particle behind; and in 
places where, two or three years before, there was a 
populous town, if the inhabitants, as is frequently 
the case, have chosen to abandon it, there will be a 
very thick wood, and not a vestige of a post to be 
seen." — Selected. 



8 TORT FOR LITTLE FOLKS. 



Mamma was having her afternoon chat with the 
little ones, and each one was telling what they were 
going to be when they grew up. Charley said he 
"was going to be a farmer, and have fine horses and 
cattle, and a plow that he could ride." 

John would be a lawyer. He "didn't want the 
sweat to be running down his back, and the dirt to 
be getting into his boots;" he would have "nice 
rooms, and sit in the shade." 

"Well, May?" said mamma; as the sweet blue eyes 
sought hers. "I will "be a teacher, mamma, and I 
won't never, never pull little girls' ears, and I'll help 
them to get the multiplication table, and let them 
make pictures on their slates." 

"And what will Bertie be?" said mamma. Now 
Bertie was the four-year-old boy, and that very morn- 
ing he had walked down town with papa, and stood 
awhile in front of the blacksmith's shop. He had 
seen the flaming forge, and the big bellows, and the 
red-hot iron beat mto many shapes. So, walking up 
to his mother, and looking rather down on the farm- 
er, the lawyet, and the school-teacher, he said, "I'se 
agoing to be a blacksmif shop." — N. Y. Observer. 



TEMFERAKGE. 



VICTIMS OF INTEMPERANCE. 



HOW NATIONS AS WELL AS INDIVIDUALS HAVE 
BEEN DESTROYED. 



. The history of the numerous victims of intemper- 
ance, or for that matter intemperance itself, is the 
most melancholy of all histories, and also one of the 
most important, involving as it does, not only indi- 
vidual successes and failures, but the successes and 
failures of nations as well. Every page is charged 
with warning; every chapter reveals the folly of the 
world and the world's great men and rulers, and 
proves it true that the "wine and wassail have taken 
more strong places than gun or steel." Intemper- 
ance is habit and nothing but habit, and a habit, too, 
against which nature seriously revolts at first, but 
to which she in the course of time and opposition 
submits, and of which she finally becomes fond. It 
is only by this force of habit that the taste of wine, 
of opium, of snuff, and of tobacco, becomes pleasant, 
for these are not among the real wants of nature, but 
are purely artificial. 

Habitual and long continued use of intoxicating 
drinks gains an irresistible influence over both the 
mental and physical powers. The moral qualities 
become weak or blunted, the mind languid and all 
the physical constitution changed and impaired, and 
instead of the harmony that nature intende'd to have 
with man there is continual strife with the tyranni- 
cal fiend, appetite, for says he who knew man pass- 
ing well: 

"Boundless intemperance 
In nature is a tyranny ; it hath been 
The untimely ending of the happy throne 
And fall of many kings." 

Notwithstanding the well-known evil effects of in- 
dulgence in the use of inebriating drinks, the habit 
is one of the most enslaving, exercising a peculiar 
fascination over the mind, against which the keenest 
consciousness of the wrong and of the temporal and 
spiritual consequeness have not the slightest influ- 
ence. Most of us believe that any habit can be con- 
quered, but there are instances which overthrow any 
such theory; instances where loss of character, friends 
and wealth, and the greatest physical and mental an- 
guish count as nothing, if only wine may be had. 
Dr. Cheyne, a celebrated physician of Dublin, tells a 
story of a man of his acquaintance, cultivated, popu- 
lar and wealthy, who had contracted the habit of in- 
temperance. Every effort was made to reclaim him 
in vain. His friends implored him to abandon the 
vice, and regain his moral influence and his health. 
In answer to them he finally said: "I am convinced 
that all you saj' is only too true, but I cannot resist. 
If a bottle of brandy stood at one hand, and the pit 
of hell yawned at the other, and I knew that if I 
took but a swallow of the brandy 1 should be pushed 
in, I should drink it. You are all very kind. I 
should be grateful for so many kind, good friends, 
but you may spare yourselves the trouble of trying 
to reform me — the thing is impossible." 



Dionysius, the younger, is another instance of this 
infatuation. Aristotle says he would be for ninety 
days at a time in a state of intoxication, and the fre- 
quent recurrence of the habit deprived him in time 
of his eyesight. The Emperor Zeno was in the habit 
of drinking himself into an insensible condition, and 
when in that condition one day his Queen, Ariadne, 
had him taken to a tomb, the horrors of which he 
fully realized, when after some hours his senses re- 
turned to him. But his pleadings and cries were 
not heeded. He died an agonizing death, hated by 
his wife and his people. He was indeed a victim of 
intemperance. Winceslaus, King of Bohemia, when 
he went to Rheims in order to treat with Charles VI. 
on some important national questions, was so under 
the influence of the wines of that country that he 
made concessions alike disastrous to himself and his 
kingdom. A certain monarch of Africa resigned all 
right to the throne, rather than leave the Portugues 
colonies where the wines were so pleasant to him, 
and his opportunities to drink so favorable. Queen 
Elizabeth's celebrated opponent. Thane O'Neil, al- 
ways kept at least two hundred tons of wine in his 
cellar at Dundrum, and he drank of it so immoder- 
ately that his servants were obliged to bury him chin 
deep in the ground in order to allay the strange in- 
flammatory effect his excess had upon him. 

Babylon was the mightiest nation on earth until 
she became a slave to luxury and dissipation. Her 
active and warlike habits were laid aside for those 
of sensual indulgence, and soon her name had be- 
come a reproach. Said Jeremiah: "The mighty men 
of Babylon have forborne to fight, they remained in 
their holds; their might hath failed; they became as 
women." 

Cyrus was the avenging Nemesis for outraged na- 
ture. Whilst Belshazzar was engaged in one of his 
luxurious feasts, Cyrus, whose plans were made in 
the knowledge of Belshazzar's habits, entered the 
city, surprised the people, and slew the King and his 
companions, and the great empire of Babylon passed 
into his possession. Cyrus was the founder of the 
Medo-Persian Empire. At first he possessed a coun- 
try containing only 100,000 inhabitants, but by his 
temperate and warlike habits he soon made it almost 
boundless in extent and unrivalled in power. But 
his victories in their turn introduced to his people 
the same habit of luxury and sensuality that had 
made many other nations fall so easy a prey to his 
courage and military tactics. Luxurious habits are 
necessarily the bane to national prosperity, and after 
the union of the Medes and Persians, and the fall of 
Babylon and its possession by Cyrus, corruption 
seized upon the Persians. They became intemperate 
and effeminate, and when the Macedonian king 
marched against them, they fell, as did Babylon. 

The Macedonians were warlike, and under Philip 
and Alexander, successful in all their enterprises. 
Alexander is esteemed a greater man and general 
than Philip, but Philip was what would be called in 
this age a shrewd politician, and with his superior 
executive ability, superior discipline, and wonderful 
command over men, he might have excelled his son 
in greatness but for the habit of intemperance. Phil- 
ip finally fell by the hand of an assassin, the victim, 
although indirectly, of intemperance. Alexander, 
justly called "the great," early fell a victim to his 
love for drink. In the beginning of his remarkable 
career he was temperate in all his habits. Once 
when the Queen of Caria sent him some choice and 
sumptuous dishes of food, and some of her best cooks 
and bakers, he said: "I do not need them; I am sup- 
plied with better cooks by Leonidas — a march before 
day to dress my dinner, and a light dinner to pre- 
pare my supper." Plutarch defends him against 
the charge of excessive drinking. He says he was 
not so much given to it as was said; that, although 
he sat long at the table, it was more to talk than to 
drink. "Every cup contained some long discourse," 
and he cites as an instance of his contempt for luxury 
and luxurious habits his surprise when, after he had 
conquered Darius, he examined the tent Darius oc- 
cupied, and said, "I am surprised that such effemin- 
acy should occupy the attention of a king." Had 
Persian luxur}' never corrupted Alexander he would 
have remained unequaled in all the attributes that 
make a man great. Later on Plutarch admits that 
he became greatly dissipated. His entrance into 
Carmenia was a mere bacchanalian celebration. His 
visit to Persia and his conduct near the tomb of Cy- 
rus disclose one of the most degrading scenes in his 
life. He offered valuable prizes to those who drank 
to excess, and one man named Promachus, the win- 
ner of the chief prize, drank four congii (fourteen 
quarts, English measure) of pure unmixed wine, dy- 
ing from the effects in three days after. Thirty men 
in their efforts to win prizes died on the spot, and 
soon after six more fell victims to drink. Plutarch, 
on the authority of Charos, says that forty-one per- 



sons died from excessive drink and the severely cold 
weather. 

Alexander's habits caused his death. At a wild 
carousal, gotten up by Medias, he drank all day and 
night, consuming fourteen quarts of wine, in drink- 
ing to the health of Proteas. This brought on a fever 
from which he died. Seneca says of him: "This 
hero, invincible by all the toils of prodigious march- 
es, by all the dangers of sieges and combats, by the 
most violent extremes of heat and cold, lies conquered 
by his intemperance." 

The Thracians and Scythians were notorious for 
their intemperance. Both, but more especially the 
Scythians, were celebrated for moderation" and 
strength in the early part of their history, but in the 
latter part they were known as "hard drinkers." Af- 
ter Cleomenes, Prince of Sparta, visited the Scyth- 
ians, his countrymen said that his communication 
with the Scythians had made him a drinker of wine, 
and the wine had made him mad. "When persons 
wished to drink to excess," said Herodotus, "they 
said 'Let us drink like Scythians.' " Both Thracians 
and Scythians considered themselves happy only 
when filled with unmixed wine, and they even poured 
it upon their garments. The "Thracian way" of 
drinking and the "Scythian way" of acting are sim- 
ply to drink quantities of pure wine, and act like a 
maniac or a fool. 

The history of the Thracians contains the story of 
the vile treachery of Rhescuporis, and his murder of 
his nephew Cotys, who assuredly fell a victim to the 
"Thracian way of drinking," and to the "Scythian 
way of acting." 

The history of the Gauls is full of instances of the 
effects of indulgence in strong drink. Under Bren- 
nus the Gauls invaded the Roman Empire and took 
the Capital, but they drank so freely of wine that 
they lost their precaution, and Camillus, the Roman 
hero, living in retirement at Ardea, resolved to save 
his city, and knowing their condition, surprised them 
and put them to flight. 

Germanicus won his victories over the Marsi — a 
German people — because of their intemperance. Of 
the Germans Tacitus says: "Indulge their love 
of liquor to the excess they require, and j'ou need 
not employ the terror of your arms; their own will 
subdue them." Their customs were similar to those 
of the Persians. Travelers at various times have no- 
ticed the habits of drinking in Germany, and the 
Duke of Rohan says that they seem to have discov- 
ered perpetual motiv^n in the use of the wine-cup. 

Not an ancient nation can be mentioned that was 
not the victim of intemperance. The Carthagenians, 
the Lydians, the Byzantines, the Parthians, the peo- 
ple of Tarentum, the Babylonians and Assyrians, the 
Medes and Persians, the Greeks and Romans, all 
drank to excess and fell victims to their own vices. 

The ancient Britons, a race of savages, are sup- 
posed to have been frugal and temperate, but from 
using the dress and language of the Romans, they, 
by degrees, imitated and adopted the vices and lux- 
uries. By the time of the Norman conquest they had 
become so corrupt that soon the vigorous and war- 
like Normans fell under the spell and adopted the 
habits one by one. 

As to the effects of intemperance on the moral and 
intellectual powers history is voluminous, and fur 
nishes numerous examples. In ancient times Cam- 
byses; Philopater, fourth King of Egypt, called Zap- 
cur, because of his extravagance and debauchery; 
Prusia, king of Bythnia (140 B. C); Tiberius, deri- 
sively nicknamed Biberius; Nero Claudius; Sylla, 
tyrannical and ambitious; Maximinus, ferocious and 
pitiless, and indeed nearly all rulers of the Old 
World, way into modern times, until the Reforma- 
tion, prove beyond doubt the brutalizing effect of 
immoderate drink on the feelings and its destruction 
of all natural feeling. 

While admitting that wines are only injurious in 
the abuse, not in the right use of them, it is none the 
less true that the misery of every city is proportion- 
ate to the number of saloons. The French boast of 
the few instances in their country of drunkenness, 
and yet "they drink regularly." If it is true it must 
be because the}', better than any others, know how 
to manage and conceal vices, since all history proves 
that in a national point of view, in the effect on mind 
and morals, on religion and the physical condition 
of man, intemperance has most unfailing and disas- 
trous effect. In this age when civilization has so far 
advanced, that satiated men are unceasingly seeking 
for variety and excitement, we can only look with 
horror upon the adoption of so many luxurious hab- 
its and wonder if the history of intemperance, like 
all other history, will repeat itself. — Cleveland 
Leader. 



Every real thought on every real subject knocks 
the wind out of somebody or other. — Holmes. 



f^ 



i 



THE CHKISTIA3Sr CYl^OSimE. 



September 24, 1885 



LITERATrRE. 



AiPES's Ctclopbima of UNnvKKS.u. LiTBRATrRB. present- 
ins biographical and critical notices, and specimens from the 
writings of emiuen: authors of all aces and all nations. Vol. 1. 
Abbot "to Arnold. 475 pp. Price tVVT John B. Alden, New York. 

The t-elebnueil ami justly jx>pular work of Cham- 
ber's which the same publisher made so accessible to 
book-buyers of moiierate means, is one of the best 
works of its kind. But it is not altogether perfect, 
since it is a cyclopetlia of the English language only, 
is arrangeii in periixis and actorviing to the character 
of the writing. This handsome volume introduces a 
work baseil on another plan. The alphabetical ar- 
rangement has Iven adopteii, thus facilitatiug refer- 
ence, and the literature of every age and nation which 
has been translateil into the English langu;ige finds its 
place. The literature of America has never, it is 
believed, been so carefully and fully presented as it 
promiseil in this work. It is. to be sure, hardly pos- 
sible that numerous minor writers whose names sim- 
ply are mentioned in other compilations will receive 
the notice of a biographical sketch with selections 
from their writings, but there is great promise of 
fairness and justice to literature in this volume, no 
matter how unknown or uubefriended the author. 
For convenience of reference this work will surpass. 
and its fine type and easily read pages will attract 
many who open for curiosity merely, to become read- 
ers well repaid for a study of its pages. This work 
is issued also in parts at 15 cts, each, but none who 
see this handsome first volume will fail to prefer it 
as really cheaper. 

The October number of the Sorth American Review 
contains twenty -three articles by as many different 
contributors — among whom are an English Cardi- 
nal, an American Admiral, two American Major- 
Generals. two Americ-an ex-Ministers to European 
courts, an American Artist, a New York Assembly- 
man, an ex-f'nited State Senator, the Mayor of New 
York, an ex Governor of New York, and 
two distinguished American Men of Letters, 
a famous American Financier. Cardinal Man- 
ning on "Inhuman Crimes in Ireland,'" William W. 
Aster on "America and the Vatican," Fitz John Por- 
ter on "How to Quell Mobs,'' and a symposium on 
"The President's Policy'' will be the articles most 
read on acx-ount of their timeliness. While "Abra- 
ham Lincoln in Illinois'' by Hon. E. B. Washburne, 
and "Vice Presidential Politics in 1864" by Beaja- 
min F. Butler, will be read for their historical value. 

Mr. George W. Cable, whose articles in defense of 
the civil rights of the colored race are a remarkable 
contribution to our political literature, will contrib- 
ute to the Cenfury a series of papers on Creole slave- 
songs and song-dances, including the songs of the 
Voudous (dealing with the rites of negro serpent- 
worship), etc.. which Mr. 1). W. Kembel will illus- 
trate. Gen. Grants third paper in the Century war 
series, a description of the battle of Chattanooga, 
will appear in November. The Wilderness article 
will be printed in one of the winter numbers. 

Vick't ilng'izine for September is tinted with the 
beauties of the waning summer and enriched with 
the fruits of generous autumn. Nothing that can 
be said for the development of garden fruits and 
vegetables, or the adornment of house and grounds 
by flower or shrub or %nne is foreign to its columns. 



The chtieches. 



— Since the middle of June a stringent Sunday 
law has been in force in Austro-Hungar}'. and the 
goofl results are already seen. The law forbids all 
bat necessarj' work on the Lord's Day, and, since its 
enforcement, the churches have all been Vjetter at- 
tended, and the day generally observed as a day of 
rest The Monday edition of the Vienna papers are 
now no longer published, as the work on these was 
formerly" done on Sunda}. 

— Remarkable revivals are reported among the 
Huguenot settlements in the south of France. 
Whole villages are coming to the Lord. It is anoth- 
er Pentecost, and spreads as by a powder train from 
church U) church. Gotl is Vjcstowing on these an- 
cient jjeople, who have so long held up the banner 
of the true faith amid many pf^rils, a sudden and 
overwhelming blessing. Nothing like it has been 
known in modem times. The days crowded with 
meetings, thirst for the truth, lips open, hearts full; 
a great spirit of faith and prayer, repentanfXi with 
tears, family quarrels reconciled, and the unregener- 
ated startled by what the}' witness of the power of 
God! — Hr/raiJ.etic Ren:v:w. 

— The secretary of the fJnglish Baptist Mission- 
ary Society has presented to the king of Belgium, 
an address, beautifully illuminated on vellum, en- 
closed in a fitting casket, congratulating hi ra on the 
great work he has accomplished for humanity and 
civilization in the creation of the Congo Free State, 
and in his aid to their missions. 



—Rev. A. M. Milligan, son of the late Dr. Milli- 
gan. 'of Pittsburg, Pa., has been preaching for a 
short time in Hopkintou, Iowa. Ouhis return home he 
spent Sabbath, the loth inst., in Wheaton, preaching an 
able discourse in the College chapel, and addressing 
a Sabbath-school convention Saturday evening. 

— Bro. C. R. Hunt attended the late meeting of 
the Indiana Wcsleyan conference, and reports that 
delegates were elected to attend the proposed Na- 
tional Convention of Churches. 

— Since the first of last January nearly six hun- 
dred persons have been received b}' the Bethanj' 
Presbyterian church, Philadelphia, Rev. A. T. Pier- 
son, pastor. 

— Rev. John G. Brown, D. D., has resigned the 
office of secretary of the Ignited Presbyterian Board 
of Home Missions, and Rev. William S. Owens, of 
Steubenville, Ohio, has been elected in his place. 
He will retain his pastoral charge. 

— When the American Board commenced its mis- 
sion work among the Dakota Indians the}' only num- 
bered 25,000; now theie are over -10,000. Then 
they were degraded heathen, without a written lan- 
guage, which the missionaries gave them. Last j'ear 
117 new members were received into their churches. 

— There are 20,602 elders in the Presbyterian 
church, an increase of 4,101 since the first report in 
ISSl. The churches of this denomination gave last 
year to all objects $10,192,053. This is an average 
of over S15 to a communicant. But of the whole 
sum given $7,541,017 went to congregational expen- 
ses, and only $1,772,081 to the boards of the church, 
while $82.3,755 went to miscellaneous objects and 
$55,200 to pay the expenses of the General Assem- 
bly. 

— It is reported of Dr. George P. Hays' church in 
Denver that it has 560 members, 9 elders, 9 deacons, 
and 24 deaconesses, elected by the church. Thus 
there are 42 persons oflBcially called to the exercise 
of special watch-care over the church. No one hav- 
ing over 18 persons to look after, and many of these 
often being members of one family; the work of 
looking after all is practicable, and not burdensome. 
These helpers report from time to time to the pas- 
tor all cases needing his attention. Thus the pas- 
tor's work is simplified, his burdens are lightened, 
the whole energy of the church is brought into sys- 
tematic action, the pastor is encouraged, and at the 
same time stimulated to a more prompt attention to 
all the details of his office, and none are left to suf- 
fer or complain of non-attention. 

The Reunion Presbyterian church, of Chicago, be- 
gan to commemorate the centennial anniversary of 
the beginning of the temperance reform Sabbath 
morning with a sermon by its pastor, the Rev. Wm. 
R. Scott, upon the subject of "The Progressive De- 
cay of the Liquor Traffic versus the Opinion of Dem- 
agogues and Political Tricksters." 

— Rev. A. W. Mann, the deaf-mute missionary of 
the Episcopal Church, travels annually 40,000 miles. 
He ministers to no less than 3,000 of his afllicted 
brethren, scattered over thirteen dioceses. 

— At Northfleld Mr. Moody has been buying big 
wagons to be used on Sundays for carrying to and 
from church people who live at a distance and could 
not otherwise attend. 

— In response to a petition signed by 1,000 peo- 
ple, the New London (Conn.) ministers and church- 
members have invited Messrs. Moody and Sankey to 
hold a series of meetings there. 

— There has been a great work of grace going on 
for a few months in the Congregational church of 
Peoria, 111., of which Rev. E. Frank Home is pastor. 
The result so far is the addition of 150 members 
since January 1st. 

— Mr. J. E. K. Studd, the English evangelist, is 
occupying the pulpit of Mr. Moody's church at Chi- 
cago. Mr. Studd has been working for several years 
with Mr. Moody in England. He is a most earnest 
speaker, energetic and effective. Mr. Goss, the pas- 
X/ix of the Moody church has just returned from a va- 
cation. 

— Sam Jones, the Kentucky evangelist, has given 
a new proof of his eccentricity. In one place where 
he had held a very successful revival a purse of $1,- 
500 was presented to him at the clo.se. He took out 
$200 and returned the rest, directing the committee 
to di.stribute it among the families of saloon-keepers 
who had been converted during hie meetings, and 
thus thrown out of employment. 

— Returns madetrj the Japanese Government show 
80,000 Christians in that empire. 

—The translation of the (Jld Testament into Jap- 
anese will be completed early next year. 



— The American Bible Society expends $150,000 
a year in translating, publishing, and distributing 
the Bible in foreign lands. 

— The Finns are for the most part a religious peo- 
ple, of the Lutheran faith; though there has come 
lately from the old world and settled among the 
many Finns in the iron regions of Northern Michi- 
gan, a fanatical sect, hostile to the Lutheran church, 
and holding principles subversive of the Gospel of 
Christ. It seems that persons qualified to preach to 
the Finnish emigrants cannot be found in this coun- 
try in sufficient number, hence they are here as sheep 
without a shepherd. In Geauga county, 0., there is 
a settlement of perhaps 100 Finns. They are scat- 
tered far and wide among American farmers. Rev. 
J. W. Lahde, of the seminary at Rock Island, 111., 
has taken charge of a mission among the Finnish 
Lutherans in and near Ashtabula, O. And a Rev. 
Mr. Wahlstrom, who officiates in the Swedish and 
Finnish languages, is trying to gather a Finnish 
Lutheran congregation in Chicago. In response to 
a strong appeal, the Seaman's Missionary Society of 
the Lutheran church in Finland, have promised to 
send two missionaries to this country, one to New 
York city, and one to San Fjancisco, Cal. It is es- 
timated that there are 8,000 Finns in Minnesota, Da- 
kota and Manitoba. A new church paper called 
Walwoja has been published for the benefit of the 
Finns in this country. It is a neatly printed, well 
filled monthly of sixteen pages. Bj' this means a 
large number will be reached. — Intelligencer. 

— A member of a Dakota Baptist T^hurch has re- 
cently presented a tract of land to the church. The . 
other members have had a ploughing bee, and mean 
to sow it down next 3'^ear to wheat. They expect to 
secure several thousand dollars' worth of wheat for 
church uses. 

— The following is the list of contributions of the 
Presbyterian church for the past year: Home mis- 
sions, $632,906; foreign missions, $.548,633; educa- 
tion, $115,873; publication, $34,218; church erect- 
ion, $159,050; relief fund, $83,924; freedmen, $97,- 
629; aid for colleges, $85,471; sustentation, $21,410; 
General Assembly, $55,200; Congregational, $7,541,- 
017; miscellaneous, $922,855. The total is $10,- 
298,186, an increase of over $128,500 over the pre 
vious year. The net increase of ministers is 133; 
of communicants, 28,793. The total of communi- 
cants is 643,735. 

— Bishop William Taylor has succeeded in locat- 
ing some of his large party of missionaries at May- 
umba, two degrees south of the Equator. The rest 
are at present making Loanda their headquarters un- 
til they can be scattered over the Portuguese terri- 
tory, to which they are the first Protestant missiona- 
ries. 

— A missionary of the London Society gives an 
excellent description of the Brahmans, from which 
we quote. "Although the Brahmans form only three 
or four per cent of the population of South India, 
they constitute by far (he most influential section, 
and occupy all the most prominent positions in the 
land. The intellectual professions are almost en- 
tirely in their hands. They are the ministers of 
State, the government officials, the local judges, the 
lawyers, the clerks in offices, the teachers in schools, 
the learned classes, and the accepted guides of the 
people. They are decidedly a fine race; handsome, 
well-made, comparatively light-complexioned, very 
careful in maintaining their purity of blood, very 
cleanly in person, strict teetotallers and vegetarians, 
and of such high mental endowments that there is 
no intellectual attainment to which they are not ea- 
sily capable of rising. They are also polished in 
manners, and in many ways noble in bearing. On 
the other hand, they are exclusive, haughty, ambi- 
tious, cunning, and unscrupulous. It was the Brah- 
mins principally who used to burn their widows, and 
who still doom them to life-long degradation; but in 
this matter a reformation is rapidly taking place." 

— The Hospital Sunday Fund of London for 
the present year, after deducting current expenses, 
amounts to about $167,220, and the Hospital Satur- 
day Fund to $80,000 more, or a total of about $250,- 
000 for hospital charity. This sum will be divided 
among 101 hospitals and -53 dispensaries. 

— Details of a remarkaVjle religious movement in 
Central Africa are reported to the State Department 
of the United States Consul at Sierra Leone. An 
army composed of over 100,000 Mohammadan youth, 
and divided into three divisions, is operating through- 
out an extensive territory under the command of a 
native named Samudu, who claims that he has been 
called of God to suppress paganism and open the 
roads to the coast. Though the movement is spread- 
ing the Mohammedan faith in Africa, it is impor- 
tant in that it opens up to commerce a large and pop- 
ulous territory. 



September 24, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSTJKE. 



13 



HOME HINTS. 

ELECAMPANE AS AN ANTISEPTIC. 

Iq a recent issue the Lancet mentions a 
series of articles which have appeared 
lately in a pharmaceutical paper of Bar- 
celona, describing investigations which go 
to demonstrate that the chief active prin- 
ciple of the elecampane, helenina (from 
the systematic name of the plant, Inula 
heleniurn), is one of the most powerful 
antiseptics known, and at the same time 
free from the disagreeable odor of car- 
bolic acid, which it might well replace. 

The writer in the Boletin Farmaceutico 
applied an alcoholic solution of helenina 
to slices of veal, which, though kept at a 
temperature of 28 de. C. (83.4 de. Fah.); 
remained sweet for ten days, or until com- 
pletely dry. An egg beaten up with near- 
ly a pound of water was treated with 
5 grains of helenina in six times its weight 
of alcohol remained unchanged for six 
days at a temperature of 82 de. Another 
egg similarly beaten up with water, with- 
out the drug, rapidly decomposed, and in 
twenty hours emitted a strong odor of 
sulphide of hydrogen. When to this solu- 
tion about 7 grains of helenina were add 
ed, the offensive odor quickly disappeared 
and the mixture underwent no further 
change. 

Similar experiments with urine, meat, 
and beaten-up eggs were made with car- 
bolic, boracic, and salicjlic acids instead 
of helenina; but much larger proportions 
of the acids were requiredto prevent putre- 
faction, and none ot them were able to ar- 
rest putrefaction already begun, as the 
helenina had done. It was also observed 
that the aromatic smell of the materials 
from which the drug was extracted re- 
pelled all insects, even mosquitoes, from 
the house in which the experiments were 
made. 

The Lancet adds that helenina has 
proved valuable in surgery as an anticep- 
tic when carbolic and all other agents had 
failed; also that it has been given success- 
fully in malarial fevers, and tuberculous, 
infantile, and catarrhal diarrhosa; and that 
it is expected to form an excellent substi- 
tute for carbolic acid in the Listerian sys- 
tem of aseptic surgery. Possibly the 
power of the drug to kill low organisms is 
what has made it useful as an internal and 
external remedy in tetter, psora, and oth- 
er diseases of the skin, as mentioned in 
the Dispensatory. In this country it has 
been chiefly used of late in chronic dis- 
eases of the lungs. It is said to be some- 
times beneficial when the chest trouble is 
attended with weakness of the digestive 
organs or with general debility. The an 
cients employed elecampane root very 
largely in medicine, and it would seem to 
be still more generally used in Europe 
than in America. If its alleged anticep- 
tic and germicidal properties are con- 
firmed by further tests, it is probable that 
the despised weed may rank the cinchona 
tree in sanitary and commercial import- 
ance. 

The clever definition, " Weed— A. plant 
whose uses are not discovered," thus re- 
ceives a new and striking illustration. 
Who can tell how many other old weeds 
are awaiting new uses, to justify their per- 
sistence in living? 

Elecampane is a coarse looking plant; 
the stem, rifing to six feet, is furrowed, 
branching and downy above. The radical 
leaves are very large and rougb, with ser- 
rated edges. The upper leaves are small- 
er, and embrace the stem. The flijwers, 
which appear in .July and August, are in 
heads, like sunflowers, and stand singly 
at tbe ends of the stem and branches. 
Their color is a golden yellow, odor aro- 
matic. The stem is renewed every year; 
the root is perennial. The fresh root is 
very thick and branched, having whitish 
cylindrical ramifications with thread like 
fibers. The outside is brown; within the 
root is whitish and fleshy. The agreeable 
aromatic odor of the root is increased by 
drying. The roots are dug in the fall and 
are best in their second year; when older 
they are apt to be woody. The dried root 
can be procured in almost every drug 
store, and might be worth trying as an 
agreeable and pos.-ibly tfiicient means of 
keeping apsirtments free from flies, mos- 
quitoes, and other insects. The ozoniz- 
ing power of the odor is likely to be valu- 
able also in helping to destroy bad smells 
even if the active principle should be less 
efficient than the Spanish authorities af- 
firm in preventing putrefaction and like 
unsanitary processes. 

It may be worth while also to encour- 
age the growth of the plant around out- 
houses, ditches, and drains, instead of the 
now fashionable but coarser and less ef- 



ficient sunflower, for the purifying of the 
air and the prevention of malaria. — Scien 
tific American. 

DON'T YOU THINK 

That you can send in a club of six 
or more trial subscribers at twenty- 
five cents each? We continue the 
offer of eight numbers of the Chris- 
tian Cyuosure to any address for 25 
cents. 



ANTI-SECRECY TRACTS. 

Orders filled at the rate of SO cents per 1,000 pages 
at the office, or 75 cents per 1,000 pages by Mall. 

Contributions are solicited to the I'hact Fund for 
the free distribution of tracts. 

In this series of Tracts will be found the opinions 
of such men as Hun. J. Q. Adams, Wm. II. Seward, 
James Madison, Daniel Webster, Richard Kush, John 
Hancock, Millard Fillmore, Chief Justice Marshall, 
Seth M. Gates, Nathaniel Colver, President Finney, 
President Blanchard, Philo Carpenter, Chancellor 
Howard Crosby. D. L. Moody, and others. 

1 Historical Slcetch of the N. C. A i 

2 Voice of the Empire State In Condemnation of 

Masonry 4 

5 Address to American Pastors on the Secret 

LodG:e 4 

4 Freemasonry in the Family !"..'!!'.'!.'!.'! 4 

6 Pros. Finney on the Duty of Christians toward 

the Lodge j 

i Warning against Masonry 3 

7 To the Boys who Hope to be Men, 1 

8 Freemasonry Modern Heathenism 4 

» Ministers at Rival Altars 4 

10 A Pastor's Confession .' 4 

11 Knight Templar Masonry 4 

12 Alexander Campbell's EstlmateoftheLodges.. 4 

13 " The Secret Einplre," ;. 4 

14 True and False Templarlsm 4 

15 Secrecy and sin 4 

1« Selling Dead Horses '.'.'...'.'.. 4 

17 History of Masonry 4 

18 Despotic Character of Freemasonry 4 

19 Freemasonry a Christ-excluding Religion 5 

21 Grand, Great Grand .?. J 

22 Masonic Oaths and Penalties sworn to by the 

Grand Lodge of R. 1 4 

23 Letters of J. Q. Adams and J. Madison on Free- 

masonry 4 

24 Satan'sCable Tow 4 

X Address of the Niagara Association on the jilur- • 

derof Morgan 4 

27 Judge Whitney and Masonry— Masonry Defends 

a Murderer g 

28 Nathaniel Colver and Howard Crosby on Secret 

Societies j 

29 Grand Lodge Masonry i» 

30 Masonic Oaths Null and Void 4 

31 Hon. Seth M. Gates on Freemasonry 4 

S3 Ho Wm. H. Seward on Secret Societies J 

84 Whi Great Men say about Freemasonry 3 

86 Masc Ic Chastity 4 

87 Germ, n Tract: Why a Christian should not be 

a Freemason 4 

88 Masonic Oaths and Penalties 4 

89 Should Freemasons be admitted to Christian 

Fellowship? 4 

40 The Object of the American Party 3 

41 Freemasonry a Religion (shown by its own au- 

thors) g 

42 Duty and Ability to Know the Character of Ma- 

sonry 4 

44 D.L. Moody on Secret Societies..'.!!.'!!!"!!."!! 4 

45 Ought a Seceding Mason to Keep his Lodge 

Oath? ^. ., . 4 

48 Tract in Hoilandlsh: On Knowing and "Oppos- 

ingMasonry . j 

49 John Qulncy Adams on the Duty of American 

sf Voters 4 

50 Swedish Tract: To Boys who Hope "to "be ' 

Men t 



The Facts Statea. 



HON. THURLOW WEED ON THE MOR- 
GAN ABDUCTION. 

This is a sixteen page pamphlet comprislutr a 'et- 
ter written by Mr. Weed, and read at the unveiling 
or the monument erected to the memory of Ospt. 
William Morgan. The frontispiece Is an engravmi; 
of the monument. It is a history of the unlawful 
seizure and confinement of Morgan In the Oanamlai- 
gua jail, his subsequent conveyance by Freemusonr. 
to Fort Niagara, and drowning in Lake Ontario 
He not only aubacribeis his name to the letter, but 

ATTA0HE9 H19 AFFIDAVIT tO It. 

In closing his letter he writes: I now look bacls 
through au interval of fifty-six years with con- 
scious sense ot having been governed throusrn tbe 
'• Antl-Masonio excitement" by a sincere d-siro. 
first, to vindicate the violated laws of my country, 
and n^xt, to arrest the great power and dauyuroua 
Influences of *• secret societies." 

The pamphlet is well worth per .islnp, and Is 
doubtless the last historical article which this great 
Journalist and pollti;iiaD wrote. fOhicago, National 
Christlsn Aasoolation. 1 dlcale copy, i'< oeuta. 

National Cliristian Association. 

221 W. Madison St., Chloaso, lU. 



BIRNEY. 

The sketch of JAMES G. BIRNEY, 
candidate of the Liberty Party for Presi- 
dent, in pamphlet for 25 cents. A limit- 
ed number of copies of this handsome 
pamphlet for sale at the N. C. A. office. 



"THE WHOLE IS BETTER THAK A PART," 

AND YOTJ HAVE IT HERE IN A 

"NTTT-SHELl." 

SECRET SOCIETIES ILl^tJS- 
TR,A.Th;rj. 

Containliig the signs, grips, passwords, emblems, etc. 
of Freemasonry (Blue Lodge and to the fnurteentli de- 
gree of the York riteK Adoptive M.isunrv, Revised 
Odd-fellowship, Good Templarlsm, the Temple of 
Honor, the United Sons of Industry, Knights ot Pyth- 
Ins pnd the Orange.wlth affidavits, etc. Overaw cuts, 
99nages, papercuver. Price, 23 cents; $'2.00 per dozen. 

For sale by tlie National Christian Associa- 
tion, at Head-quarters tor Auti-Secrecj 
Literature. 231 \V. Madisou St. Cbioa«;o. 




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Plates. Address DR. PEIRO, Chicago Opera House, t'-i"'-'' ""ii 
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Hon. Wm. Penn Nixon, Ed.InterOcean, . . Chicago. 

F. H. Tubbs, Esq., Manager W. U. Tel. Co., - Chicago. 

Cen. C. H. Howard, Mrs. T. B. Carse, - - Chicago. 

O .W. Nixon, M. D., Mrs. Netta C. Rood, <• Chicago. 

Henry R. Stiles, M. D., ... . NevyYor>(. 

N. B.—Our Oxygen is sifelv S'"t anywhere in the United States, Canada 
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"We offer the Christian Cynosure for one year and Webster's Prac- 
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221 W. Madison St., Chicago. 



. — _ ..u\3Eia'by mall or personally. 

situations procured M pupils when competent, 
"end lor circular. W. C. CHAFFEE, Oswefo, N. Y. 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 
DR. T. FELIX OOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM, or MAGICAL 
BEAUTIFIER. 

PURIFIES as well as BEAUTIFIES tbe 
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GOURAUD, Sole Proprietor, 48 Bond St., New York. 
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ILLUSTEATED EITUALS ! 

Complete WOEK and"SECRETS" I 

Rerbed Odd-fellowship ; FrL-emasonrv, 7 decrees; Kni..,'ht I'emplariim 
Stlito 14th Masouic dei;rei». Three volumes, $1 each. Kuightiof 
Pythiaji, 25 eents. Also other illustrated rituals, sent post paid. Cata- 

Iwues free. National Christian Association. 221 Wast 
MadlKjn Street, Chicaso, Illinois, U. S. A. 

KNIGHT TEMPLARIS3I ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

A full illustrated rittial of the six degrees of the 
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of Malta. A book of 341 pages. In cloth, SlOO; $8.50 
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Furnished in any quantities at 

MASOHIC OATHS, 

BY 

Past KI:4?.l<^p of K<'jNione L,odge, 

Mo. OSO, Cliioago. 

A masterly discussion of the Oaths ot the Masonic 
LoiiK0,to which is appt-nded "Freemasonry at a 
Glance." iiluslratiug every sitrn, grip and cere- 
mony ' f tlie Ma^ouic Lodge. This work is highly 
commended by leading lecturers as furnistiluK the 
I est arguments on the nature and actual charac- 
ter of Mii.sonic obligations of any book in print. 
Paper cover, 207 pages. Price, 4U cents. 

National Christian Association, 

321 %Vest Madison St. CM'^'ase, Eli. 



HOLDEN WITH CORDS, 

Or the Powek of the Szceet Empike. A faltiiful 
representation In story of the ev I influence of Free- 
masonry, by E. E. Flagg, author of "Little Peo- 
ple," "A Sunny Life," etc. This is a thrlllingly in- 
teresting story, accurately true to life because main- 
ly a narration of historical facts. 384 page?. In 
cloth, $1; pcrdoz., $)*. Paper, 50c; perdoz., $4. 

NOTICES OF TEE FEESS. 

"There is no important history extant but has 
connected with it numerous other Itistorles of which 
It was the initial point, oi the dominating influence. 
The abduction and murder of Morgan set ten thous 
and secri.'t springs in motion, as the surrendei' of the 
charters of so many lodges at that time, and the 
severing of their connection with the order of some 
forty t;housand of its members indicated. This 
story is one of these histories, and la e coI^ecUon of 
facts vvo/en into a story. It cannot tali to be read 
with interest . "—.f?"«e Methodist, Chicago. 

"The repubitcarion of the Reform Story which 
run through tlie columns of the C'ynosi/re for nearly 
a year is at last completed, and the book so anxiously 
expected by thousands of our readers has come from 
the press of Ezra A. Cook. The book is finely 
bound and fairly Introduces the reader to the trea- 
sures within. The publisher has made occasional 
selections from Masonic works to verify the state- 
ments of the text; these make a helpful addition for 
some who can afford no more complete an armory of ' 
this ^Ind."— Christian Cynosure 

"It is one of the most fascinatinf' narratives we 
ever read and teaches its lesson in a manner not soon 
to be forgotten. It is evidently written for tlie 
heart and its words go to the heart. It is singularly 
free from wild denunciation. Those who are Inter- 
ested In the secret society question would do well to 
form the acquaintance of this interesting work." — 
Lutheran Standard, Columbus, O. 

"The exciting scenes of the fail of 182B, at Ba- 
tavla, N. Y., when. "VVra. Morgan was murdered by 
Masonry, are woven Into the story so as to give the 
truth of History a setting of attractiveness i lie 
forty chapters of the volume are soon compassed by 
the eager reader who begins the volume. This vol- 
ume ougnt to be read and will be sought as its merits 
become known." — United Brethren in Christ. 

"In an Incidental way the story tells much about 
the manner of conducting lodges and much about 
the spirit.and methods of Mi^sonry . The story covers 
the period of the abduction and murdering of Wil- 
liam Morgan. The strategic position from which the 
author writes put a cliarmln the book, while It gives a 
good opportunity to show the worldngs of the order. 
We wish all the people would read It." — Telescope. 

"The story Is intensely interesting and the author 
has succeeded in weaving into It a great deal of In- 
formation in regard to this mysterious order, which 
Is certainly startling if true, and he gives wiiat 
seems to be undoubted evidence to prove his asser- 
tions. The book is one which should be read by both 
Masons and Antlmasons. "— fTtJj'rae Co. Berald. 

"Our Anti-secret society friends are certainty en- 
titled to great credit ir their persistence in their 
efforts xo expose and root out secrctism. The object 
of the writer of this story is to present in Its true 
iljht the crafty, unscrupulous and exceedingly hurt- 
fu' influence of Masonry, the parent of all the ox- 
dets."— Reformed Presbyterian and Covenanter. 

National Christian Association. 

221 W. Madison St.. Chioaso, 111. 



THE BROKEN SEAL; 

Or Personal Reminiscences of the Abduction 

anii Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 

By Samuel D. Greene. 

One of the most interesting books ever published. In 

cloth, 75 cents ; per dozen, S7.50. Paper covers, 40 cents ; 

per dozen, s:?.50. , , ^ .,. 

This deeply interesting narative shows what Mason- 
ry has done and is capable of doing in the Courts, and 
how bad men control the good men In the lodge and 
protect their own members when guilty of great 
crimes. For sale at 221 W. Madison St., Chicago, bv 

THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIOl. 



aK£B5aga!^Batyr^-4^ - 



s 



^cr-^Z. 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYlTOSirKE. 



September 24, 1885 



FAKM NOTES. 



SEPTEXfBER HINTS FOR FARM AND 
GARDEN. 

In laying down apiece of land to grass, 
finish the dead-furrows with the shovel. 
leaving them broad and shallow, so that 
the mower runs easilr over them, while 
the water is carried off as thoroughly as 
in a narrow furrow. A good rolling 
neatly finishes the whole work. 

Finish digging the early potatoes before 
rains cause them to sprout. Keep the 
later kinds free from weeds, either by 
running a narrow cultivator through the 
rows, or by hand pulling. 

Buckwheat is eivsily injured by frost, 
and should be cut in good season. As it 
shells easily, cut with the dew upon it. let 
it cure in small, loose bunches, and draw 
it to the barn when slightly moist. 

Stock should receive good care through 
this month. Summer heats still prevail, 
and hard work continues. Horses and 
oxen deserve good feeding and regular 
watering. Watch carefully the action of 
the horses' harness at points where galls 
or sores are likely to form. A daily bath- 
ing of the shoulders in salt and water will 
tend to harden the skin and prevent chaf- 
fing. 

ORCHARD AND FRUn GARDEN. 

The picking and marketing of early fall 
fruit is now in order. Special care should 
be taken in handling early varieties of 
apples and pears: slight bruises lead to 
speedy decay ... Send only the best fruit 
to market, well packed, and don't waste 
the rest, but preserve by drying. The 
patent driers are being improved each 
year, are of all sizes and prices, — and 
there is now no excuse for wasted fruit. 
... Most pears should be picked before 
getting mellow; a very few kinds, like the 
Rostiezer, ripen well on the tree.... 
■Where a fruit tree has not been trained 
from the start, the best time to note what 
prunning is needed, is just after the fruit 
has been picked. The cross-limbs and 
shoots will then make themselves notice- 
able, and can be cut out, or if large, 
marked with a string for late fall prun- 
ing. 

MARKET AND KITCHEN GARDEN. 

This is the month for sowing those 
crops which are to start, and remain all 
winter, for early spring growth, such as 
cabbage, cauliflowers, lettuce and onions. 
On account of the variable weather, it is 
well to sow twice, five or six days apart. 
The young plants are afterwards set out 
in cold frames to pass the winter. Some- 
times they are thinned in the row, and 
covered with straw. . . . Onions are usually 
started from the small sets, and come into 
use very early in the spring. . . .Look over 
the cucumber pickles at least every other 
day, and keep them picked off close and 
of a uniform size. A pickle two inches 
long and half an inch thick, is the favor- 
ite size. Cut with a stem. — American 
AgricuUuriit. 

now BEES PREDICT THE WEATHER. 

No. IT of Die i^Taiur contains an article 
by Uerr Emmerig, of Lauingen, on Ger- 
man bees as storm warners. From num- 
erous observations the writer advances 
tentativelj- the theory that, on the ap- 
proach of thunderstorms, bees, otherwise 
gentle and harmless, become excited and 
irritable, and will at once attack anyone, 
even the usual attendant, approaching 
their hives. A succession of instances are 
given in which the barometor and hy- 
grometer foretold a storm, the bees re- 
maining 'juiet, and no storm occurred; or 
the instruments gave no intimation of a 
storm, but the bees for hours before were 
irritable, and the storm came. He con- 
cludes, therefore, that the conduct of the 
bees is a trustworthy indication whether 
a storm is impending over a certain dis- 
trict or not, and that, whatever the ap 
pearances, if the bees are still, one need 
not fear a storm. 

TIPS FOR HOP».SES' FEET. 

There are many cases in which farm 
horses need no shoes in the summer, and 
would be better without them. A horse 
owned by the writer, had hard, dry Loofs, 
and contracted feet, which was caused by 
a natural tendency, increased by shoeing 
with high calks. For want of use, the 
frog had withered away, and the horse 
was always lame. The shoes were taken 
off, and lips only, were used. These were 
thin plates, reaching around the fore half 
of the hoofs only, to protect the toes from 
wearing away. The frog and the heels 
thus came to the ground at every step. 



the bars were able to spread, and the pro- 
per functions of the feet, to preserve 
healthful action and growth, were given 
full play The horse soon became sound, 
the frog grew healthfully, and the feet 
were in perfect order, while the expense 
of shoeing was greatly reduced. — Ameri- 
can Ag-riciiUuri.tt. 

HOESFORDS ACID PHOSPHATE. 

As a Refrigerant Drink in Fevers. 

Dk. C. H. S. Davis, Meriden, Coiiu., says: 
"I have useil it as a pleasant .ind cooling tiriuk 
iu fevers, and have been very much pleased 
with it." 



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I IGHT t^ I IFE IeSSON IeAF. 

new Lesson Leaf with two large pages thorough- 
ly tilled with able and evangelical aids to the lesson. 

IT COrS^TA-IIVS : 
1. Common version of the lesson text arranged for 
responsive reading; memory verses in brackets. 2. 
Revised version of the text. 3. Golden Text; Central 
Truth; Topic, and Outline, arranged as a responsive 
exercise. 4. Home Readings. 5. Introductory, in- 
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lesson, with the proper pronounciatiou of the names, 
and places. 7. Notes and explanations. 8. Questions. 

9. Review Exercises for the whole school in concert. 

10. Next Sundav's Lesson, including reference to 
memorj- verses and Golden Text. Conveniently ar- 
ranged, and tastily printed. 

Be sure and see this leaf before yon order for next 
qnarttr. Price, $7.20 per 100 copies, per year. Address 

T. B. ARNOLD, 106 Franklin St., 

fubilsher and Dealer in Sunday School Supplies. 

r.".r.TPLES AND CATALOGUE FREE. 



Hallelujah and Victory I 

SiXG THE Songs of P.eform at bomb, in thk 

FIELD, IN THE SHOF, IN THE CONTENTION— SINS 
THEM TILL THE BAY OF TEItJUPH COMES. 

CLARE'S REFORM SONO BOOK; 
hy George W. Clark, the "Liberty Singer" of AbolV 
tlon fame, who has complied a new book for the new 
movement. Here are- 
Songs for temperance. 

Songs for the good and true. 

Songs for freemen. 

Songs for the home. 

Songs for the devotional meeting. 

Songs for reform meetings. 

Songs that will vanquish the lodge. 

SING THEM! 

HAVE TOUE CHILDREN SING THEMl 

Price In boards, postpaid, 40 cents. ' In cloth, with 
portrait on steel, 55 cents. 

Send to the NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION, 221 W. Madison St.. Chicago. III. 



Five Dollar 

"The Broken Seal." 

"■The Maxter's Carpet." 

"I>i the Coih, or The Coming Conflict." 

'■'■The Character, Claimjs and Praclical Work- 
in(jn of FreeniOJif/nry," by Pres. C. G. Finney. 

^^Reuuied Odd-feUowship;" the secrets, to- 
gether with a discussion of the character ol 
the order. 

"Freemasonry lUrustrated;" the secrets of 
first seven degrees, together with a discussion 
of their character. 

"Serrrurrai and Addre-vici on Secret Societies;'^ 
a valuable collection of the best arguments 
again.s^t secret orders from Revs. Cross, Wil- 
liams, McNary, Dow, Sarver, Drury, Prof. J. 
G. Carson, and Prestg. George and BlancharcL 

National Cliristian Association. 

tSl W. M«dlMn St., CUoaso, HI. 

ITtEEMASONEY 

BY 

Past r»Ia*>tcr of Kt^ystone Liodge, 

No. 0;;!>, Chicago. 

IIln°tratefl every fdgn, grip and ceremony of the 
Lodge and gives a brief explanation of each. This 
work f^hould be acattered like leaves all over the 
country. It ih ho cheap that It can be used as 
tr-'ict-. and money thu^ expended will bring a boun- 
tiful harvest. .'j2 pages. Price, postpaid, 6 cents. 
Per iMi. |.'i.m. Address, 

National Christian Association, 

331 Went IVIadison St.. Cbica«o. Ui> 



Grreat Bargains 

IN ANTI-SECRECY WORKS. 

Eor four months, heginning July 1, 
we are enableii to offer the following 
great bargains iu our literature: 
FOR ONE DOLLAR. 

The Christian Cynosure four months 
to NEW subscribers and any one of 
the following selections of Books and 
Pixiuphlets: 

SELECTION NO. 1. 

Ilolden >vit.h Cords, paper 50 

Minutes of the Syracuse Convention and 
seven v.aluable addresses 25 

Proceedings of Pittsburg Convention, and 
ten addresses by prominent men 25 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on Morgan abduction 05 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self-con- 
demned, or reasons why their members 
cannot be fellowshipped by the United 
Presbyterian church. With an appeal to 
young men. By Rev. J. W. Bain 20 

Freemasonry as a religion, by Eld. J. Day 
Brownlee 05 

A review of two Masonic addresses, by Eld. 
John G. Stearns 05 

Cynosure four months to new subscriber. . 50 



Total 11.85 

AH for one dollar 

SELECTION NO. 2 

Freemasonry Illustrated, three degrees, 

paper 40 

Minutes Syracuse convention, etc 25 

Proceedings Pittsburg convention, etc 25 

Freemasonry as a Religion, Eld. Brownlee 05 
Review of two Masonic addresses, by Eld. 

Stearns 05 

Batavia Convention pamphlet 25 

Freemasonry, etc., Self -condemned, Bain. 20 

Cynosure four months, etc 50 

Total $1.95 

All for 07ie dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 3. 

Revised Odd-fellowship, illustrated, paper 50 

Holden with Cords 50 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self-con- 
demned, by J. W. Bain 20 

Freemasonry as a Religion, Brownlee 05 

Review of two Masonic addresses, Stearns 05 

Thurlow Weed on Morgan abduction 05 

Cynosure for four months 50 



IN THE COILS ; 



OR- 



Total $1.85 

All for one dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 4. 

Knight Templarism Illustrated, paper 50 

Holden with Cords 50 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain !30 

Eld. Steams' review of Masonic addresses. 05 

Proceedings Pittsburg Convention, etc 25 

Cyiwsnre louT mouihs, 50 

Total $2.00 

All for one dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 5. 

Hand-Book of Freemasonry, by E. Ronayne 35 
Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 20 

Eld. Stearns' Review 05 

Holden with Cords 50 

Proceedliigs Syracuse Convention, etc. . . . 25 

Thurlow Weed Pamphlet 05 

Cynosure four months 50 

Total $1.90 

All for one dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 6. 

Knights of Pythias, illustrated 25 

Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain ; 20 

Review of Two Masonic Addresses, by Eld. 

Stearns 05 

Ritual of the Grand Array of the Republic 10 

Proceedings Syracuse Convention, etc 25 

Proceedings Pittsburg Convention, etc. ... 25 

Holden with Cords 50 

Cyrwsure for four months 50 

Total $2.10 

All for <rne dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 7. 

Finney on Masonry 35 

The Broken Seal 35 

Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 20 

Eld. Stearns' Review 05 

Proceedings J'ittsburg Convention, ete 25 

CyiMxure for four months 50 

Total $1.70 

All f'jr vne dollar. 



RE VISED ODD-FELL WSHIP 
ILLUSTRATED. 

The complelf revised ritual of the Lndfte, Encamp- 
mi-iit and n.-l>i'kali(lndli;-'Ml'-krf.cR, prof iJKi'ly III iiHira- 
ti'il, iuirl Kii.u'!int(i-il to hi: Htrlclly ncruriite; with a 
Hki'Kiiof r)i.-.,rl(,'li],|]lHloryniid(:liariH:tiTC)f tlicordiT, 
oviT oil'' liiiiidrid foi.<l-i]ot(; i|iiol!illonBfrorii Blundard 
aulhorltlcK, BhowlnKlhe rhiirurlcr and tcHchlnn" of 
the order, and an analysis of each di-(,'ri'e hy President 
.J. islanchard. The ritual correBpondH exactly with 
thc"Chargc Books" furnished hy the Sovereign Grand 
Lodge. In cloth, 81.rxj;perdozen, 88.00. Paper cove-, 
.'< ccd'b; per dozen %i.m. 

All orders promptly tilled by the 
NATIONAL CHKI.STIAN ASSOCIATION. 
321 W. Madison street, OhIoaKo. 



Jhe Coming Conflict. 



A NEW AND STRANGE STORY BASED ON STARTLING 

FACTS, VIVIDLY PORTRAYING A MYSTKRIOUS 

AND D.AJJGEROUS POWER AT WORK IN 

THE GOVERNMENT, THE CHURCH, 

AND THE HOME. 



"All will agree that this is a powerfully written 
Btory."— JBuanje/wt, (Chicago, Ills.) 

" A book which we trust may have a wide circula- 
tion." — National Baptist, (Philadelphia.) 

"So intensely interesting did I find it that it was 
hard to pause until the Uist sentence was read. This 
work places the author high among the writers of fic- 
tion."— »'. IK. Barr,D. D.in Ohristinn Imtniclor, (Phil- 
adolphia.) 

** " Unless we are greatly mistaken, the work will do 
more to awaken the American church and people to 
the evils of Freemasonry than any other book re- 
cently published." — Evangvlical licposilorif. 

*' The book will create a sensation in Masonic cir- 
cles, and evoke criticism of a moat rolentlesH character. 
The courage of the author in attacking such a rock- 
rottted bulwark as Freemasonry issontethingto admire, 
Fanatic though he be." — Nebraska WaU-hman. 

" Light is needed on this subject and needed badly, 
and we welcome this contribution to the literature of 
anti-secretism, and cordially commend it to the favor- 
able attention of our readers." — United Presbyterian, 
(Pittsburgh.) 

" A charming work, fit to be classed with ' Uncle 
Tom's Cabin;' it is indeed loss a work of fiction. The 
volume is as valuable as a work of reference as it is 
agreeable, truthful and useful. Our young folks will 
not leave the book, if they begin it, till they 'see how 
it turns out.' " — Oi/nosure, (Chicago, Ills.) ^ 

4Thicl< paper, beautifuly bound, 362 pages, sent to 
any address lor $1.60. AGENTS WANTED. 

BATAVIA OONVDNTION PAMPHLET. 

A^SiaggeringBlowl 

Such was to Freemasonry the great NATIONAL 
CONVENTION held In Batavia, N. Y., September- 
1882. It gave the world 

Thurlow Weed's Great Letter 

On the abduction and murder of WILLIAM MOR- 
GAN In 1826, which has been the most widely pub- 
lished of any Antl-masonic document. The dedica- 
tion of a noble granite monument to the memory of 
Morgan, and the able and eloquent addresses of the 
Convention make this a most valuable pamphlet. 

It contains— 

1. Portrait of Morgan. 

2. Portrait of Thurlow Weed. 

3. Fine picture of the Monument. 

4. The great letter of Thurlow Wesd and his affida- 
vit—almost the last public act of his life. 

5. Address hy J. E. Roy. D.D. 

6. The monument oration by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. 

7. Addresses on "Christian Politics" by Pres. J. 
Blanchard, on the Character of Freemasonry hy 
Prof. E. D. Bailey, on the "Freedmen and Secret 
Societies" by Rev. H. H. HInman; and very interest- 
ing personal and historical remlnlsences. 

READ ABOUT THIS GREAT HISTORICAL] 

MEETING. 

A handsome pamphlet. Price, 25 cents, postpaid. 

Bend to the NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 

TICK. 231 W. Maoison St.. CmoASo, Ii,l. 



HAND BOOK 

OF 

Freemasonry, 

BY 
E. 15, o 11 a y 11 .9» 

Pastaiaslor of Keystone Rodge. No. 689, 
CBiicago. 

Gives the correct or " Standard " -work and ritual 
of Masonry; tho proper position o£ each othcer in 
the Lodge room, order ot openins and closing the 
Lodge, dress of candidate, ceremony of initiation, 
the manner of giving the signs, grips, [etc., are fully 
lUustrlated and explained. In short, it is 

A Complete and Accurate Lsrtge Manual. 

The high standing of Mr. Eonayne in the fraterni- 
ty, his popularity and success as a teacher and lee; 
turi>riu the Lodge, logother with the tostimnuy o' 
bign Masonic authority, leavoHuo doubt of thoaccu 
racy of this work. It is rapidly becoming a stan- 
dard work iu the hands of actino lodge OFFiciALa 
aud those who desire to post themselves on the 
workings of the order. The price is so low that it ie 
within tho roach of all. Sent po.stpaid securely 
wrapped on receipt of price. \M pages. Paper cov- 
ers, 3.'> cents. Elegant cloth with beveled edger 
aud gilt stamp, $1.U0. Address 

National Christian Association, 

sail W. Iffiadiseu Ht., daie^aaf^St 111 

The Master's Qarpet, 

BY 

K. R^onayne. 

Pest master of Keystone I,o<lg;e No. 63V> 
Cliicago. 

Explainu the true source and meaning of every 
ceremony and symbol f>f the Lodge, thus showing thb 
principles on which the order is founded. By a 
careful perusal of this work, a more thorough 
knowledge of tho principles ^>f the order can bo ob- 
tained than by attending theLod^je for years. Ever^ 
Mason, every person contemplating becoming a 
member, and even those who are indifferent on the 
Bubject, should procure and carefully read this woik. 
An appendix le added of 32 pages, embodying 

Freemasonry at a (jlance, 

.■hich gives every sign, grip and ceremony of the 
IjOdge toge'her with a brief explanation of each. 
The work contains 42!, pai^os aud is substantlaU^r 
and elegantty bound In cloth. Price, 75 cents. 
Address 

National Christian Association, 

S31 W. raadisou St., Chicago. IlL. 



September 24, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYKOStJKE. 



15 



Ilf BRIEF. 

A professor at the University in Berlin, 
having tried it, says that it takes ten 
times as long to commit to memory eighty 
meaningless syllables as it does to master 
eighty that have meaning. 

Agents of the Board of Health in New 
York have been analyzing the soda water 
sold by druggists, but have found only 
four samples out of fifty where traces ex- 
isted of the lead, copper or sine lining of 
the pipes. 

England does one third of all the bank- 
ing business of the world. The Bank of 
England holds one-seventeenth of all the 
deposits of Great Britain. The total 
amount held is, in round numbers, $27,- 
000,000,000. 

The ex-Empress Eugene is making a 
round of European watering places as the 
Countess de Pierrefonds. The detective 
police of Carlsbad, learning that the as- 
sumed title was fictitious, reported her as 
an adventuress. 

The English health authorities are sore- 
ly exercised over the importation of "ar- 
tificial honey," composed of wheat or 
corn starch treated with acid, the product 
of American ingenuity. Detection by 
the taste is impossible. 

An English writer points out the proba- 
bility that a smoky atmosphere is not a 
wholly unmitigated evil, since its carbon 
and sulphur must absorb many germs of 
disease, and tend to prevent the spread of 
epidemics. 

The experiment of a language club is 
about to be tried in New York, having 
for its object the preservation of the Eng- 
lish language in its. unadulterated purity. 
Among the principal movers in the mat- 
ter are Pres. Barnard, of Columbia Col- 
lege, Robert CoUyer, and others. 

Jews-harps were among the curious 
items of traffic carried out by Bishop Tay- 
lor's company of missionaries. It is said 
that "the idea was suggested by a story 
of a commercial traveler in Africa, who, 
failing otherwise to attract the attention 
of the natives, mounted a rock and played 
on his jews-harp so effectively that the 
natives became infatuated with the in- 
strument, and gladly exchanged a pound 
of ostrich feathers for a jews-harp." 

Some years ago, travelers " in Dalmatia 
noticed large tracts of land covered by a 
wild flower, near which not a sign of in- 
sect life was visible. The bloom was the 
pyrethrum, whose odor deals death to the 
lower forms of life, and whose powdered 
leaves form the basis of "insect powders." 
The seed of this flower was distributed in 
the United States; and a Dalmatian has 
been growing it with great success in 
Stockton, Cal. 

Mr. Eli Wright, of Youngstown, Ohio, 
believes that he was the youngest Union 
soldier in the war of the rebellion. When 
he enlisted, in 1862, he was 12 years, 2 
months old, and at the age of 13 partici- 
pated in the battle of Cedar Mountains. 
He served in Battery B, First Ohio Light 
Artillery, until the close of the war, and 
now weighs 283 pounds. 

It has been mentioned as a curious fact 
that the wife of Mr. Chandler, the ex-Sec- 
retary of the Navy, should have been the 
daughter of a former Senator Hale, while 
the wife of Senator Hale of the present 
day is the daughter of a former Secretary 
Chandler. No relationship exists between 
either of the families. One has a son 
named Hale Chandler, and the other a son 
named Chandler Hale. 

One of the greatest curiosities of the 
present day, found among the pines of 
Central Wisconsin, was discovered near 
Knowlton, a few weeks ago. It was in 
the form of a petrified squirrel, and about 
the size of a common squirrel, and was 
taken from the heart of a tree by some 
woodmen. It was of a brownish color, 
as hard as a rock, and was "as natural as 
life," even to the kink in its long, bushy 
tail. The curiosity was careful packed 
and sent by William MulhoUen, the own- 
er, to President Cleveland, from whom a 
personal letter of thanks was received by 
the sender, saying that it would be care- 
fully preserved and placed in the public 
museum at Washington. 



KNIGHTS OF I^YTHIAS IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

By a Past Chancellor. A full Illustrated exposition 
of the thrfee ranks of the order, with tlie addition of 
the "Amended, Perfected and Amplified Third 
Bank." The lodge-room, signs, countersigns, grips, 
etc., are shown ))y engravings. 23 cents each; per 
dozen, 82.00. Address the 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 

%21 W. Madison St.. Chisaco. 



Standard Works 

—ON— 



FOB SALE BY THE 

Kational Christian Associat'n 

ll\ West Madison Street, Chicsgo, Illinois. 

%. comolete Oatalosne Bent tree on Application. 

In the Coils; or, tbe Coming Conflijt. 
By "A Fanatic." A historical sketch, by a United 
Presbyterian minister, vividly portraying the vcork- 
ings of Secretism in the various relatione of every- 
day life, and showing how individual domestic, 
social, religions, professional and public life are 
trammeled and biased by the baneful workings of 
the lodge. Being presented in the form of a story, 
this volume will interest both old and young, and 
the moral of the story will not have to be searched 
for. $1.50 each ; $15.00 per dozen. 

Bolden With Cords. Or tub Powbb or 

THK Sbckkt Empiek. a faithful representation In 
story of the evil Influence of Freemasonry, by E. 
E. Flagg, Author of "Little People," "A Sunny 
Life, "Etc. This is a thrllUngly Interesting story ac- 
curately true to life because, mainly a narration of 
historical facts. In cloth $1.00; paper 50 cents. In 
E'inney on Masonry. The character, clai as 
and practical workings of Freemasonry. By Preot. 
Charles G. Finney, of Oberlln College. President 
Finney was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge 
when he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. In cloth, 75 cent,*; per 
dozen, $7 60. Paper cover, 36 cents ; per dozen. 

taco. 

The Broken Seal: or Personal Reminiscence' 
of the Abduction and Murder of Capt. Wm, Morgan. 
By Samuel D. Greene. One of the most Interesting 
books ever published. In cloth, 75 cents , per dozen, 
*7. 60. Pace- covers. 40 cents; per dozen, $3.50 

Secret Societies, Ancient and Mod&rn. 
A bock of great Interest to officers of the army and 
navy, the bench and the clergy. Tablb of Con- 
TBNTS! The Antiquity of Secret Societies, The Life 
of Julian, The Eleuslnlan Mysteries, The Origin of 
Masonry. Was Washington a Mason? Fillmore and 
Webster's Deference to Masonry, i_ Jrlef Outline of 
the Progress of Mason'y In the United States, The 
Tammany Ring, Masonic Benevolence, the Uses of 
Masonry, An Illustration, The Conclusion. BO cents 
each ; per dozen, $4. 75. 

Ez-President John Quir.C7 Adams' 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obliga- 
tions and Penalties. Thirty most Interesting, able 
and convincing letters on the above general subject, 
written by this renowned statesman to different pub- 
lic men of the United States during the years 1831 
to 1833. With Mr. Adams' address to the peo.ile of 
Massachusetts upon political aspects of lodgery; an 
Appeudix giving obligations of Masonry, and an able 
Introduction. This Is one of the most telling anti- 
secrecy works extant, aside from tbe Expositions. 
Price, cloth, $1.00; per dozen, $9.00. Paper. 8t 
cents ; per dozen, $3. 50. 

G-eneral "Washington Opposed to Se- 

CEET Societies. This Is a republication of Gover- 
nor Joseph Rltner's " Vindication of Oenerai 
Washington from the Stigma of Adherence io 
Secret Societien," communicated to the House of 
Representatives of Pennsylvania, March 8th, 1837, 
at their special request. To this Is added the fact 
that three high Masons were the only persons who 
opposed a vote of thanks to Washington on his re- 
tirement to private life— undoubtedly because they 
considered him a seceding Freemason. 10 cents 
each; per dozen, 75 cents. 

OoUeg:e Secret Societies. Their customs, 
character, and the efforts for their suppression. By 
H. L. Xellogg. Containing the opinion of many 
prominent college presidents, and others, and a full 
account of the murder of Mortimer Leggett. % 
cents each: per dozen, $3 00, 

Secret Societies. A discussion of their char- 
acter and claims, by Rev. David McDlll, Prest. J. 
Blancbard and Kev, Edward Beecher In cloth, 
85c. per dOK. 13. $5. Paper cover. 15c. Per doz. $1.85. 

History of the Ahduction and Murder 

OF Capt. Wm. Morgan As prepared by seven com- 
mittees of citizens, appointed to ascertain the fate 
of Morgan. This hook contains Indisputable, legal 
svldence that Freemasons abducted and murdered 
Wm. Morgan, forno other offense than the revela- 
tion of Masonry. It contains the sworn testimony 
of over twenty persons. Including Morgan's wlfej 
and no candid person, after reading this book, can 
doubt that many of the most respectable Freema- 
sons in the Empire State were concerned In this 
crime; 25 cents each; per dozen, IS. 00. 

Seminisconces of Morgan Times, "y 

Elder David Bernard, author of Bernard's Light on 
Masonry. This is a thrilling narrative of the Inci- 
dents connected with Bernard's Revelation of Free- 
masonry. 10 cents each; per dozen, $1.00. 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. William 
Morgan. The genuine old Morgan book repub- 
lished, with engravings showing the lodge-room, 
dress of candidates, signs, due guards, grips, etc. 
This revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
murdered the author for writing it. 25 cents each ; 
per dozen, $2.00. 

ON FREEMASONRY. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Eider u. 

Bernard. To which is appended "A Revelation of 
the Mysteries of Oddtellowship (old work,) by a 
Member of tbe Craft." Tbe whole containing over 
five hundred pages, lately revised and republished. 
In cloth, $1.,50 each ; per dozen, $14.50. The first 
part of the above work. Light on Freemasonry, 416 
pages, 75 cents each; per dozen $7.50. 

Hand-Book of Freemasonry, by K. Ro- 
nayne, Past Master of Keystone Lodge, No. 039, 
Chicsgo, gives the correct or "standard" work and 
ritual of Masonry; the proper position of each 
officer in the lodge room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, dress of candidate, ceremony of 
initiation, the proper manner of giving the signs, 
gripe, etc., are fully illustrated and explnined. 



initiation, the proper manner of giving the signs, 

f rips, etc., are fully illustrated and expl-'-~-" 
irst three degrees. Paper cover, 35 cents. 

The Master's Carpet, or Masonry and Baal 
Worship Identical, explains the true source and 
meaning of every ceremony and symbol of the 
lodge, and proves that Modern Masonry is identi- 
cal with the "Ancient Mysteries " of Paganism. 
Bonnd in fine cloth, 420 pp 75cts. 

Freemasonry at a Glance lUastrates every 
sign, grip And ceremony uf the flrst tbree degrees. 
F»V«i: coTtSt ^ pawM. jftiu^ 6npf, six Mints. 



Freemasonry Illustrated. A complete 
exposition of the seven degrees of the Blue Lodge 
and Chapter. Profusely illustrated. A historical 
sketch of the institution and a critical analysis of 
the character of each degree, by Prest. J. Blanch- 
ard, of Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations 
and nearly four hundred notes from standard Ma- 
sonic authorities confirm tbe truthfuluess of this 
exposition and show the character of Masonic teach- 
tog and doctrine. The accuracy of this exposition 
legally attested by J. O. Doesburg, Past Master Un- 
ity Z3 No. 191, Holland, Mich., and eth rs. This 
Is the latest, most accurate and complete exposl- 
llon of Blue Lodge and Chapter Masonry. Over 
one hundred Illustrations — several of them full 
page — give a pictorial representation of the lodge- 
'oom, chapter and principal ceremonies of the de- 
grees, with the dress of candidates, signs, grips, 
«tc. Complete work of 640 pages. In cloth, $1 00. 
per dozen, $9.00. Paper covers, 75 cents ; per doz- 
en, $7.50. First three degrees (370 pages), in cloth, 
75 cents ; per dozen, $7.50. Paper cover, 40 cents ; 
per dozen, $4.00. >8®=-The Masonic quotations are 
worth the price of this book. 

Mah-Hah-Bone; comprises the Uand Book, 
Master's Carpet ancf Freemasonry at a Glance. 
Bound in one volume. This makes one of the most 
complete books of information on the working's 
and symbolism of Freemasonry extant. Well 
bound in cloth, 589 pp $1.00 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. A full 
and complete illustrated ritual of the five degrees 
of Female Free Masonry, by Thomas Lowe; com- 
prising the degree of Jephtha's Daughter, Ruth, 
Esther, Martha and Electa, and known as the 
Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, Wife's De- 
gree, Sister's Degree and the Benevolent Degree. 
'26 cents each ; per dozen, $1.75. 

Knight Templarism. Illustrated. A full 
Illustrated ritual of the six degrees of the Council 
and Commandcry, comprising the degrees of Royal 
Master, Select Master, Super-Excellent Master, 
Knight of the Red Cross, Knight Templar and Knight 
of Malta. A book of 341 pages. In cloth, $1.00; 
$8.50 per dozen. Paper covers, 50ct8; $4. IK) per 
dozen. 

Grand Lodge Masonry. Its relation to 
civil government and the Christian religion. By 
Prest. J. Blanchard, at the Monmouth Convention. 
The un-Chrlntlan, anti-republican aiKl despotic 
character of Freemasonry Is proved from the high- 
est Masonic authorities. 5 cents each; per dozen. 
50 cents. 

vuage Whitney's Defense before the 
Brand Lodge of Illinois. Judge Daniel H Whit- 
ney was Master of the lodge when S. L. Keith, a 
membtr of his lodge, murdered Ellen Slade. ,'udge 
Whitney, by attempting to bring Felth to Justice, 
brought on himself the vengeance ^t the lodge, but 
he boldly replied to the charges against him, ana 
afterwards renounced Masonry, 15 cents each; per 
dozen, $1.25 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemasonry, 
as proved In court in the New Berlin Trial. Also 
the letter of Hon. Richard Rush to the autl-Mason 
Ic committee of York County, Pa.. May 4th, 1831. 
The New Berlin trials began In the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public Initiations by seceding 
Masons. These trials were held at New Berlin. 
Chenango Co., N. Y., April 13 and 14tli, 1831, and 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons, swore to the truti 
ful revelation of the oaths and penalties. 10 centi. 
each; per dozen, $1.00. 

Stearns' Inquiry into the Nature and 
Tendency of Freemasonkt. With an Appendix 
treating on the truth of Morgan's Exposition and 
containing remarks on various points in the charac- 
ter of Masonry, and a Dialogue on the necessity of 
exposing the lodge. 338 pages: cloth, 60 cents each 
per dozen, $5.00. Paper covers, 40 cents each; pe« 
dozen, $4.00. 

Masonic Oaths Null and Void ; or. Free- 
masonry Self-Convicted. This is a book for the 
times, 'rhe design of the author is to refute the ar- 
guments of those who claim that the oaths of Free- 
masonry are binding upon those who take them, 
llis arguments are conclusive, and the forcible 
manner in which they are put, being drawn from 
Scripture, makes them convincing. The minister 
or lecturer will find In this work a rich fund of 
arguments. 807 pp., postpaid 40 eta. 

Bernard's Appendix to Light on Mac 
SONRY. Showing the character of the institution 
by its terrible oaths and penalties. Paper covers: 
25 cents each; per dozen, $2.00. 

Freemasonry Self-Condemned, By Bev 
J. W. Bain. A careful and logical stat Mnent of 
reasons why secret orders should not be f ellowsblpeti 
ijy the Christian Church, and by the United Presby- 
terian church In particular. Paper covers: price, 
20 cents each; per dozen, $2.00. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, adverse 
to Christianity, and Inimical to republican govern- 
ment. By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian), 
a seceding Mason of 21 degrees. This Is a very 
telling work and no honest man who reads It will 
think of joining the lodge. 15 cents each; per 
dozen, $1.25. 

The Mystic Tie, or Freemasonry a 
League witu the Devil. This Is an account of 
the church trial of Peter Cook and wife, of Elkhart, 
Indiana, for refusing to support a reverend Free- 
mason; and their very able defense presented by 
Mrs. Lucia C. Cook, In which she clearly shows 
that Freemasonry Is antagonistic to the Christian 
religion. 15 cents each; per dozen. $1. '35. 

Sermon on Masonry, by Rev. James Wil- 
liams, Presiding Elder of Dakota District North- 
western Iowa Conference, M. E. Church — a seced- 
ing Master Mason. Published at the special ie- 
quest of nine clergymen of different denominations, 
and others. 10 cents each ; per dozen, 75 cents. 

Are Masonic Oaths Binding on cne In- 
ITIATE. By Rev. A. L. Post. Prooi' of the sinful- 
ness of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudl&te them. 5 
cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Freemasonry Contrary to the Ohris- 

TiAN Religion. A clear, cutting argument agalnsv 
the loJge, from a Christian standpoint. 5 cents 
each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Christian should 
not be a Freemason. By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 
The author states bis reasous clearly and carefully, 
and any one of the thirteen reasons, if properly con- 
sidered, will keep a Christian out of the lodg*. 6 
cents each; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Oaths and Penalties of the 33 De- 

SBEES OF 'i'REKJiASONBY. To get thcsc thirty-three 
degrees o. Masonic bondage, the candidate takes 
halt-a-milllon horrible ottho. 16 cents each; per 
dozen. $1.00. 

ON ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

Sermon on Odd-fellowship and Other Se- 
cret Societies, by Rev. J. Sarver, pastor Evangel- 
Iciil Lutheran church, Leechburg, Pa. This )s a 
very clear argument against secretism of all forms 
and the duty to disfellowship Odd-fellows, Freema- 
sons, Knights of Pythias and Grangers Is clearly 
shown bj their confessed character as found In 
their own publlcatloni. 10 centi eacb; per dozen. 
T6c«nti. 



Odd-fello'wship Judged by Its Own utier 
ances; Its Doctrine and Practice Examined In ths 
Light of God's Word. By Kev. J. H. Brockman. 
This is an exceedingly Interesting, clear discussion 
of the character of Odd-fellowship, In the form of a 
dialogue. In cloth, 50 cents; per dozen, $4.00. 
Paper covers, 25 cents; per dozen, $2.00. Geiman 
edition, entitled "Christian and Ernst," paper covers, 
50 cents each. The German edition Is published by 
the author. 

Revised Odd-fellowship Illustrated. 
The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, Encamp- 
ment and Rebekah (ladles') degrees, profusely Illus- 
trated, and guaranteed to be strictly accurate; with 
a sketch of the origin, history and character of the 
order, over one hundred foot-note quotations from 
standard authorities, showing the character and 
teachings of the order, and an analysis of each de- 
gree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual cor- 
responds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. In cloth, 
$1.00; per dozen, $8.00. Paper cover, 50 cents; per 
dozen, $4.00. 

Other Secret Society Rituals^ 

Ritual of the Grand Army of the He- 

PUBLic, with signs of recognition, passworde, etc. 
and the ritual of the Machinists and Blacksmiths' 
Union. (The two bound together.) lOceutseach; 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Knights of Pythias Illustrated. By. 

Past Chancellor. A full illustrated exposition of the 
three ranks of the order, with the addition of the 
"Amended, Perfected and Amplified Third Rank." 
The lodge-room, signs, countersigns, grips, etc., 
are shown by engravings. 25 cents each ; per dozen, 
$2.00. 

United Sons of Industry Illustrated, 
A full and complete illustrated ritual of the secret 
trades-union of the above name, giving the signs, 

trips, passwords, etc. 15 cents each; per dozen, 
1.25. 

Exposition of the Grange. Edited by Rev 
A. W. (Seeslin. Illustrated with engravings, show- 
ing lodge-room, signs, signals, etc. 25 cents each ; 
oer dozen, $2.00. 

Temple of Honor Illustrated. A full and 
complete illustrated ritual of "The Templars oi 
Honor and Temperance," commonly called the 
Temple of Honor, a historical sketch of the order, 
and an analysis of its character. A complete ex- 
position of the Subordinate Temple, anci tbe de- 
grees of Love, Purity and Fidelity, by a Templar 
of Fidelity and Past Worthy Chief Templar. 25 
cents each ; per dozen $2.00. 

Good Templarism lUusti ated. A full and 
accurate exposition of the degrees of tho Lodge, 
Temple and Council, with engravings s'nowing tne 
signs, grips, etc. 25 cents each; per dozen, $2.00. 

Five Rituals Bound Together. "Oddfel 
lowship Illustrated" (old work), "Knights of 
Pythias Illustrated," "Good Templarism illus- 
trated," "Exposition of the Grange" and "Ritual 
of the Grand Army of the Repimlic," are sold 
bound together in Cloth for $1.00; per doz., $9.00 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated, com- 
posed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated," "Adop- 
tive Masonry llluatiated," "United Sons of In 
dustry Illustrated," and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated." $1.00 each; per dozen, $9.00. 

Sermons and Addresses. 

Sermon on Secretism, by Rev. R. Theo 
Cross, pasior Congregational Church, Hamilton, N. 
Y. This Is a very clear array of the objections to 
Masonry that are apparent to all. 5 cents each; per 
dozen, 50 cents. ' 

Prof. J. Or. Carson, D. D., on Secret 

Societies. A most convincing argument against 
fellowshiping Freemasons in the Christian church. 
10 cents eacij ; per doiec,, ?E cea*? 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Conspiracy. 

Address of Prest. J. Blanchard, before the Pittsburgh 
Convention. This Is a most convincing argument 
against the lodge. 5 cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

A Masonic Conspiracy, Resulting in a 
fraudulent divorce, and various other outrages 
upon the rights of a defenseless woman. Also the 
account of a Masonic murder, by two eye-witnesses. 
By Mrs. Louisa Walters. This Is a thrllUngly Inter- 
esting, true narrative. 80 sent* eacli' perdoaea 
ISt DO 

Sermon on Secret Societies. By Rev. 
Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The special object 
of this sermon is to sliow the r'ght and duty of 
Christians to examine Into the character of secret 
societies, no matter what object such societies pro- 
fess to have. 6 cents each ; per dozen, BO cents. 

Discussion on Secret Societies. r!i 

Elder M S Newcomer and Elder G. W, Wilson, s 
Royal Ai-ch Mason. This discussion was fii-.^t pub 
Ushed In a series of articles In the Church Advocat . 
25 cents each; per doz $2.00. 

Prest. H. H. George on Secret Societies. 

I- powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret societies, 
10 cents each : per dozen. 75 cents. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State and 

C.1URCU. By Rev. M. S. Drury. The antagonism 
of organized secrecy to the welfare of the family, 
state and church is clearly shown. 10 cents each: 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Narratives and Arguments, showin,,- the 
conflict of secret societies with the Constltuuon 
and laws of the Union and of tb". States. By 
Francis Sempie. The fact that sec societies In- 
terfere with the execution and pervert the adminis- 
tration of law Is here clearly proved, 15 cents each; 
(>er dozen, $1 25. 

Sermon on t^asonry. i!y Rev. J Day 

Brownlee. In reply to a Masonic Oi-ation by Rev. 
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'111 able man. 5 cents eacli ; per dozen 50 cents. 



History- Kat'l Christian Association. 

Its origin, .objects, what It has done and aims to dc, 
and tbe best means to acco;nplIsh the end sought; 
the Articles of Incorporation, Constitution and I>y- 
"»ws of the Assodatlon. 25c. each , per doz. $1.50. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and Modern, 
AND College Secket SocrETiES. Composed of 
the two pamphlets combined in this title, bound 
together in Cloth. $1.00 each; per dozen, $9.00. 

Morgan's Exposition, Abduction and 

MrKOER, AND Oaths of 33 D^IDEEES. Composed o( 
"Freemasonr/ Exposed," by Capt. Wm. Morgan, 
"History of the Abduction and Murder of Morgan:' 
"Valance's Confession of the Murder of Capt, W n 
Morgan;" Bernard's Reminiscences of Morgac 
Time's, "and Oaths and Penalties of 83 Degveea.'' 
304 payoa^ ,».>,_ 

National Christian Association. 



■te^MMaAaitea^aiMtiiill^fejasss " 



.^^m 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



September 24, 1886 



NE\SS OF THE WEEK. 

COCXTKT. 

A decision by United States Judge 
Brewer, that 27.iXXl acres of land held by 
the Kansas Southern Railroad are legally 
a part of the public domain, has caused 
■wLld excitement in Southern Kansas. 
Farmers are flocking to Woodson and 
Greenwood counties and staking off 
claims. 

In a cellar in Chinatown. San Francis- 
co, the coroner found. Tut-sday. a mass of 
human skulls and bones, partly covered 
■with flesh in the last stages of putrefac- 
tion; and in adjoining rooms a number of 
Chinese were discovered boiling bones 
and scraping and packing them in boxes 
for shipment to China. The cellar con- 
tained, it is believed, the remains of three 
hundred bodies, which had been stolen 
from cemeteries throughout the State. 
The bones and strips of skin were so 
packed and labeled that the remains could 
be easily claimed by the relatives in 
China. 

Mrs. Joseph Airey. a confirmed inebri- 
ate, whose father was a prominent tem- 
perance advocate in England, cut the 
throats of her three children at Toronto, 
Oat.. Friday morning, inflicting danger- 
ous wounds. The woman was locked up. 

Fire in a double tenement house in East 
Eighty-first street. Xew York, Monday 
morning, created a panic among the hun- 
dred inmates, but all escaped either by 
the stairways or fire ladders, except a wo- 
man and her babe, who fell down an air- 
shaft in the roof, both being instantly 
killed. 

John L Sullivan, the pugilist, pleaded 
guilty at Cleveland Monday to the charge 
of Sunday ball-playing, and was fined $1 
and costs— a total of $16. 

By a frieght train collision near Guill- 
ford, Ind., Saturday night, nine tramps 
were imprisoned in a car filled with oats, 
three of the men being suffocated. 

Near Lexington, Ky., Tuesday, a pas- 
senger train, moving with great speed, 
jumped the track and tumbled down an 
embankment. Two persons were killed 
and a number of others wounded or scald- 
ed. T. J. Nichols, a well-known horse- 
man of Fans. Ky., received fatal injuries. 

Reports from fifty-nine towns in Wis- 
consin regarding the result of Tuesday's 
license election show that twenty-two 
adopted the $-500 license, ttiirty-<^is voted 
for $2<J<.>, and one town adopted the $350 
rate. 

The Government Directors of the 
•Union Pacific, after investigation, report 
that the condition of affairs at Brook 
SpriDgs, Wy. T., the scene of the recent 
massacre of the Chinese, is such as to 
jeopardize the govern mo ni's interests, 
and suggests prompt interference by ihe 
, military. General McCook is on the 
ground, under orders to give strict pro 
tection to the Chinese Consuls, who are 
making investigations. The Consuls 
claim that twenty five Chinamen had been 
killed, and that not a single American 
born citizen participated in the rioting, 

A coal barge was wrecked near Galves- 
ton. Texas, Friday, two of the lifeboat's 
crew and the crew of five on board the 
barge perishing. 

Owing to the long strike nail dealers at 
Pittsburg report the supply smaller than 
in the past twenty years, and claim that 
an order for 2t)<) kegs could not be filled 
in that city. 

A hailstorm, some of the stones being 
ten inches in circumference, devastated 
the country south of Granite Falls, Minn., 
Wednesday night. Drifts of hail three 
feet in depth were found. 

Miss Dean, daughter of the wealthy 
lumber dealer of Chicago, began working 
in a spinning mill at Rockford Monday 
lat, for 60 cents per day. Her father, 
however, gives her a dollar for each cent 
earned She had enough fun after she 
had earned about $l.'j<). 

Miami University at Oxford, 0., was 
reof)ened Thursday, after having been 
closed for twelve year.s, and the event was 
celebrated with fireworks, a procession 
and a public meeting. 

A sudden subsidence of seven hundred 
feet of a high embankment on the West 
Shore railroad near Glen Erie, N. Y., has 
occurred and is due, it is supposed, to the 
existence of a subterranean cavern. 

The prairie fires no.v raging in Dakota 
are the most disastrous ever experienced. 
The flames have swept across the country 
over HX) miles east of Bismarck and the 



damage is beyond estimate. In many 
cases the dwellings and barns of farmers 
have been destroyed. [and grain and stacks 
are all ablaze. Passengers on incoming 
trains state that the prairies for miles 
present a scene of destruction. A wom- 
an living near Steele, was fatally injured 
by inhaling the flames while ende.ivoring 
to escape. At one place on the line of 
thero.ad twenty-three stacks of grain are 
now burning. Prairie fires have also been 
raging west of the Missouri river, and 
much damage is reported from thai sec- 
tion. Near Sims buildings were found 
burned down and the bodies of the wom- 
an of the house and her baby in the em- 
bers burned to a crisp. The baby was 
clasped close in the mother's arms. The 
man of the house was at work at Sims at 
the time. 

A dispatch from Jamestown, Dak., says 
the devastation by prairie fires from BiS' 
marck to Fargo far surpasses the destruc- 
tion of any previous year. Hundreds of 
wheat crops have been swept out of ex- 
istence. The amount of wheat burned is 
immense and it is estimated that the en- 
tire cr,ip of 100 farms between James- 
town and Bismarck have been destroyed. 

FOREIGN. 

The populace of Palermo, Sicily, are 
paaic stricken over the appearance of 
cholera in that town. There is slill much 
suffering in Gibralter on account of the 
disease. 

Barnum's great elephant, Jumbo, was 
killed by a freight train near St. Thomas, 
Out , Tuesday evening. 

A respite has been granted Reil, under 
sentence of death for participation in the 
Northwestern uprising. Riel asserts that 
even should the rope be placed about 
his neck it would be removed by divine 
interposition. He is reprieved till Oct. 
ISth. 

Over two hundred deaths from small- 
pox occurred at Montreal the past week. 
The Treasury Department has ordered 
that no vessels from infected Canadian 
ports, which cannot show clean bills of 
health, be allowed to land in the United 
States. 

The Governor-General of Eastern Rou- 
melia has been deposed by the populace 
of the capitol city, who have proclaimed 
a union with Bulgaria and established a 
provisional government with headquarters 
in their city. Philippopolis. The revolu- 
tion is believed to have been instigated 
by Russia, and was accomplished without 
bloodshed Eastern Roumelia was given 
an autonomous government by the Berlin 
conference of 1878, although it has re- 
mained an integral pari of the Turkish 
empire. 



MARKET RE PORTS. 

CHICAGO. 

Wheat^No. a @82 

No. 3 73K 

Winter No 2 86^ 

Com— No. 2 42}4 44 

Data— No.2 2r,}4 

Rye— No. 2 56 .58 

Bran per ton 12 00 

Flour 1 75 @5 00 

Hay— Timothy 8 00 @15 00 

Mess pork per bbl 9 05 

Butter, medium to best 11 @22 

Cheese 05 @10 

Beans 1 15 @1 30 

Eggs 16 

Seeds— Timothy 1 65 @1 75 

Flax 1 21 

Broomcom 02 @ 06 

Hides— Green to dry flint 073^ @ 14 

Lumber — Common 1100 (^18 00 

Wool 14 @28 

Cattle — Choice to extra 5 40 @6 05 

(Jommon to good 2 25 @5 25 

Hogs 3 00 @4 50 

Sheep 1 75 ©3 50 

NEW YORK. 

Flour 3 00 (3:5 25 

Wheat— Winter 92^ @97>^ 

Spring m^X 

Com 48 @50 

Oats 27 (a(41 

Mess Pork H 25 

Eg?s 16X 

Butter 8 23 

Wool 13 @37 

KANSAS CITY. 

Cattle 2 40 @5 40 

Hosts 8 65 @4 15 

S>i»«n 1 .50 'ftS 00 



OUR. CLUB LIST. 




MAN 



NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE! 

Families are making up their lists of 
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We still send an extra copy of the 
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club of ten at $1.50. 

We give below a list of papers which 
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reduced rates: 

The Cyxosuke and— 

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The Truth (St. Louis) 2 50 

Illustrated Christian Weekly 3 90 

New York Witness 2 50 

Union Signal 3 00 

Christian Statesman (Phila.) 3 5o 

The Interior 3 85 

The Independent 4 25 

The S. S. limes 3 50 

Gospel in all Lands 3 50 

The Nation 4 50 

New York Tribune, Weekly 2 50 

Chicago Tribune, Weekly 2 50 

Chicago Inter Ocean, Weekly 2 50 

Harper's Magazine 4 75 

North A raencan Review 5 75 

The Century 5 25 

Scientific American 4 25 

Buds and Blossoms 2 10 

Pansy 2 35 

Vlck's Magazine 2 50 

American Agriculturist 2 60 

If any complaints arise in regard to 
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publisher or to us if more convenient and 
we will forward your request. 

If several of the above papers are 
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W. I. Phillips, Publisher, 

221 W. Madison street, Chicago. 



A GOOD MANY 

TIMES ONE WANTS TO REFER TO SOME 
ARTICLE IN THE NeWS, BUT THE NUM- 
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UUAVi AMn A Christian School, Ms boys and 
"" ' L.HreU, tills (or Iho hest oolloRos, huslness 
or leaching. KNpcn.^eR very low. Terms begin Sept. 
U), Jim. 0, Moll. ;il. G. F. LiNKiKLt>. Prin., 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

TODD SEMINAEY FOR BOYS. 

Fall term begins Sept. 15. A (lelightful home, with 
kinil. parental care, anil thorough Instruction. Am- 
ply eiinlpped for thirty pupils. , ,„ 
REV. K. IC. TODD, A. M., PrIn., Woodstock, III. 

Monticello Ladies' Seminary. 

«OI)l'KKY, flIADlSON COUNTY, ILL. 

One of I he olilesi schools In the West. Reputation aa 
a ilrsi-elass school uminesllimed. Superior advan- 
tages for Kngllsh and Cassleal Kducatlon, with Music. 
Drawing, Painting and Modern Languages. Opens 
Septemlier 23d. For Catalogue apply to 

MISS H. N. HASKELL, Principal. 

HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ar-d Hospital. Cliicajro. Superior Cllnleal ad- 
vantages. Twenly-slxlh annual session begins Sep- 
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/^^~r~»T~T"~r "l\ T • Morpliine Hiibit, 
KJ XT Ju IJ JVJLI Op<u»n Siuoltiiig;. 

easily cured. Atlvice free. 

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A OXLI Rfl A Smlthnlght's Asthma and Hay 
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Wm. H. Martin, 12(1 Washington St., Chicago. 

Lessoe Qu'nterly. 

Contains the same matter as the Light and Life 
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Arranged for Study. 

Rev. E F. Williams writes: "Your treatment of the 
First Epistle of John Is unique, and Is suggestive of 
thought and labor." 

Limp cloth cover, 136 pages. Sent, postpaid, for 50 

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no sure 



'IN SECRET HAVE I 8 AID NOTHING."— Jesus Christ. 



Vol. XVIIL, No. 2 



CHICAGO, THUKSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1885. 



Whole No. 



PUBLISHED "WEEKLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

S21 West Madison iSf^-'xt, Chicago. 

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W. I. PHILLIPS PUBLISHEK. 

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CONTENTS. 



Editokial : 

Notes and Comments 1 

The Swedish Aurora Bo- 

realis 8 

Popery and Masonry 8 

The Secret Empire 8 

Personal Mention 9 

Contributions : 

Week-day Sermon 1 

Isaac and Ishmael 2 

Selected : 
Anniversary of John the 

Baptist 2 

Popularity Versus Princi- 
ple 3 

The Right of Women to 

Preach 3 

Some Personal Experi- 
ences 3 

Free-thinkers Want Rec- 
ognition 3 

The Secret Empire : 

History of Masonry 4 

Bible Lessons 6 



CORRBSPONDENOB : 

A Murderer Escapes the 
Law ; Lodge Charity and 
Intimidation ; Pith and 

Point 5,t) 

Reform News: 
From the General Agent; 
From the Iowa Agent; 
The 111. Wesleyan Con- 
ference; Chicago Worlv. 5 

Vacation Rambles 9 

Literature 9 

The Home 10 

Temperance 11 

The Churches 13 

Lodge Notes 12 

Then. C. a 7 

The American Party 7 

Churches vs. Lodgert 7 

Lecture List. 7 

Farm Notes 14 

In Brief 15 

News op the Week 16 

Markets 16 



At one of their Sunday picnics in this city the 
Anarchists spent more than $600 for cigars and 
beer. Upon some of the banners borne in the pro- 
cession and standing about the grounds were such 
mottoes as "Our Children cry for Bread!" So the 
W. C. T. U. is aiter all the great anti-monopolist. 



The Freemasons of America are continually point- 
ing with pride to the fact that the English Grand 
Master is a leading member of the Eoyal family. It 
is also a fact worthy of the notice of all Masons who 
respect social morality that it is reported that the 
same Grand Master is the greatest dancer in Eng- 
land, and the Indejjcndent lately says of him: "Miss 
Calely, a young lady of great beauty, is to be added 
to the list of Englishwomen who have positively de- 
clined to permit the Prince of Wales to be intro- 
duced to them, regarding his acquaintance as a so- 
cial stigma." It is well enough to put these facts 
together when making up the moral status of a so- 
ciety which has continued for so manj- years at its 
head such a social leper as the Prince is reported 
to be. 



The struggle between Freemasoniy and Catholic- 
ism in Brazil a few years ago will be remembered. 
It was altogether a political squabble for supremacy 
and resulted somewhat unfavorably for the Bishop 
of Pernambuco, who championed the papists. If it 
had an}' practical influence it was only such as was 
easily counteracted by the secession of the Grand 
Master of English Freemasons, the Marquis of Ripon, 
for the Roman Catholic fold. In Peru the lodge is 
also attempting to get a foothold, and although un- 
der an interdict they have been bold enough to give 
out that a Masonic temple was to be built in Lima. 
The Roman Catholic bishop called the attention of 
the Minister of Justice to the report, and received 
answer that by virtue of the constitution the govern- 
ment has not permitted and will never permit the 
erection of a Masonic temple in_ Lima. 



Among the "just things" which should first of all 
be done for the workingman, is to provide for him 
or assist him to provide for himself, a Sabbath; not 
alone a time of rest, but also those sacred privileges 
that hallow the day. And before all corporations, 
railways, factories, or other private enterprises, the 
Government should begin the work. When it is re- 
membered that the Post Office department keeps up 
a continual strain upon its men in every large city, 
and sets the example of running its cars on the 
Lord's Day, it is not so surprising that many capi- 
talists follow so pernicious an example. In Chicago 
out of 481 employes only thirty have the Sabbath 
whollj' to themselves, and in Philadelphia 300 men 
are at their ordinary work on that day. These facts, 
well saj'S the Christian /Statesman, are "enough to 
stir the blood of every Christian' man, and to secure 
general co-operation in the effort to right this wrong." 



The city of Louisville made an inglorious day for 
her history last Thursday. The sale of the one hun- 
dred thousandth hogshead of tobacco was made the 
pretext for a great celebration with a procession 
eight miles long which proceeded to the exposition 
building where the hogshead was sold for $2,023. 
This was glorying in a shame, literally. Such a pro- 
cession, instead of drawing into its line the business 
interests of a great city, should be led bj' the victims 
of the tobacco poison. Let General Grant and his 
patient physicians and mourning family, Senator 
Hill, and the scores of cancer-inflicted men begin 
the line. Let them be followed by the tiiousands 
and millions of diseased and poisoned young men 
of America, the millions of little children who have 
inherited a diseased system from tobacco-using pa- 
rents, the millions of drunkards who began their ca- 
reer with a cigar or a quid. Let the smoking cars 
be coupled on, reeking with tilth and profanity. 
Could such a dismal procession be formed, and drag 
its painful length through the land, it would be fol- 
lowed everywhere by groans and lamentation. And 
whither would it be tending? 



London is annoyed, perhaps alarmed, by Socialist 
meetings and riots, as well as Chicago. A riot last 
week Mondaj' was followed on the Sabbath by an 
immense demonstration in which fort}' thousand per- 
sons participated. Thougii the speakers violently 
denounced the present order of society the day 
passed peacefully. The authorities wisely ari'anged 
to keep the police out of sight, so that there might 
be less temptation to those riotously disposed. A 
powerful impetus has been given to popular agita- 
tion of this kind by the exposures of the traffic in 
female virtue by the Fall Mall Gazette, supported by 
the immense demonstrations of the Salvation Army. 
The article of Cardinal Manning in the current 
North American Review is a clear and forcible ex- 
planation of the fearful condition of English laws 
in respect to this crime. Our English correspond- 
ent, Rev. John Boyes, writes us also on this topic. 
Mr. Stead, editor of the Gazette, has, after being 
subjected to severe and unjust rebuke by a magis- 
trate, been committed for trial, the case 
growing out of his exposures. The end 
of this business is not yet and the volcanoes 
in some of our American cities may yet be uncapped. 
The Ncvjs is attempting the business in Chicago, and 
with some popular effect. 



The terrible outrage upon the Chinese miners at 
Rock Springs, Colorado, has been carefully investi- 
gated by the government directors of the Union Pa- 
cific road, in whose employ the murdered men were. 
Every f.acility was given the citizens and nimers en- 
gaged in the massacre, to explain their case, which 
they did fully until the circumstances immediately 
connected with the outrage were brought up, when a 
uniform refusal to say anything was giv- 
en. The personal testimony of no Chinaman could 
be obtained until there was a positive assurance on 
the part of the committee and the Chinese consuls of 
New York and San Francisco that they should not 
be molested. The directors report to the govern- 
ment, "We find such a condition of afl^airs here, as, 



in our opinion, endangers the property of the road, 
jeopards the intersets of the government, and calls 
for prompt interference." Colonel Bee, employd 
as counsel by the Chinese government, says that all 
the legal proceedings have been a mere farce, and 
he will call for prosecution in the U. S. courts. It 
has been found that of the men immediately en- 
gaged in the massacre not one is American-born ! 
This fact adds to the shame of the affair, and will 
justly increase the prejudice against some classes of 
foreign immigrants. But a deeper shame was that 
the Knights of Labor lodges championed the cause 
of the murderers, and threatened a general strike all 
along the road if the Chinese were again set to work. 
Mr. Callaway, the general manager, was not intimi- 
dated by their threats, but sent them to the mines 
last week. Notice was given the striking miners 
that they would not be again employed. Mr. Charles 
Francis Adams, Jr., president of the road, agrees 
with the manager in making an issue with the lodge 
at this point, and if a strike is ordered will turn 
over the road to the government, and let bullets and 
bayonets be the argument for the Mollie Maguires 
of the Knights of Labor. 



The roysterers of Appletree Tavern, London, in 
1717, very well understood that the organization 
they were founding had nothing in its constitutional 
principles to interfere witli the indulgence of its 
members in social vices. Hence the Prince of 
Wales can remain Grand Master, murderers like 
those of Morgan and Ellen Slade can be defended 
and set free, and lechery and drunken debauchery 
such as attended the Knight Templars "conclaves" 
at Washington, Chicago and San Francisco has no 
rebuke. The following story of an old house in 
Grosvenor street. West London, called the "Feath- 
ers," after the well-known arms of the Prince of 
Wales, illustrates the fact that other secret orders 
are like Masonry in moral character: "A lodge of 
Odd-fellows was held at this house, into the private 
chamber of which George, Prince of Wales, one 
night intruded very abruptly with a roystering 
friend. The society was, at the moment, celebrat- 
ing some of its awful mysteries, which no unitiated 
e}e may behold, and these were witnessed by the 
profane intruders. The only way to repair the sac- 
rilege was to make the Prince and his companion 
'Odd-fellows,' a title they certainly deserved as rich- 
ly as any members of the club. The initiatory rites 
were quickly gone through, and the Prince was 
chairman for the remainder of the evening. In 
1851 the old public house was pulled down and a 
new gin palace built on its site, in the parlor of 
which the chair used by the distinguished Odd-fel- 
low is still preserved, along with a portrait of his 
Royal Highness in the robes of the order." Wes- 
ley's old pulpit would hardly be chosen as agin pal- 
ace advertisement. 



WEEKDAY SERMON. 



BY E. E. FLAGG. 



It seems to me that one great advantage of read- 
ing the Bible through in course is that by so doing 
we notice many of its truths in new relations. The 
Mosaic code may not be in itself entertaining read- 
ing, but what a grand humanity it teaches! For all 
"the mistakes of Moses" I wish some of our legisla- 
tors could go to school to him. I think they would 
graduate with new and enlarged ideas on several im- 
portant subjects. 

For instance, if he could bring his wise and rigid 
system of sanitary laws to bear upon the Chinese 
question, how soon it might be settled in a way that 
would involve no broken treaties and no outrage on 
human rights. Would he allow, as do our city 
authorities, that close herding together in filth 
and wretchedness of which the long roll of infant 
mortality every year is only the natural result? 
Would foreigners be permitted to override American 
liberty with Continental license, if with us as with 
the ancient Jew there was one law alike for the na- 
tive born and for the stranger within our gates? So 



ii^ 




■ 'Mfr'OTiOil 



THE CmtlSTLAJ^ CYKOStrRE. 



October 1, 1885 



with the labor problem. Moses reooguizeii the 
great truth which, if not laid down in our present 
systems of political et.'onomy, will be when future 
generations have learned to base this giandest of 
human Sciences on the broad gi-ound of Christian 
ethics instead of a cold, prudent, calculating seltish- 
ness, that all law should be framed especially for 
the advantage of the i.>oor, or in other wonls should 
favor the many rather than the few. Instead, wo 
allow powerful lobbies to .push bills in the interest 
of Ciipitalists. of monoix>lists, of shrewd, selfish men 
who are thus given a double and treble advantage 
over the great mass of their weaker fellow-beings. 
I don't think it would take Moses long to settle the 
liquor or the Mormon question, but I imagine he 
would feel a little contempt for the blunders of our 
American law-givers who, if they had a tithe of his 
brains, his conscience, or his courage, would not ig- 
nore these burning questions, or stick fast in a quag- 
mire every time they try to handle them. 

Leaving this particular branch of the subject, 
however, there are wonderful glints of God"s char- 
acter to be discerned in some of the least devotional 
parts of Scripture. Note the reason why Leah is 
given the blessing denied her sister. -'The Lord 
saw that she was hated," or loved less than her 
beautiful rival, and the great heart of Infinite Pity 
yeameil toward the neglected wife and desired to 
make it up to her in the love of children and the 
honor attached to their possession. How that sin- 
gle touch from the pen of inspiration brings out the 
Fatherhood of God! What a sense of personal near- 
ness it gives us. What a comforting thought for 
all his despised children. For every cross he has 
a crown to bestow; for every trial patiently borne 
some blessing far outweighing the pain. And in 
the beautiful words of one who has just dropped 
her pen forever: — 

'•As all feeble babes that suffer, 

Tos« and cry and will not rest, 

.\re the ones the tender mother 

Holds the closest, loves the best- 
So when we are weak and wretched, 

By our sins weighed down, distressed. 
Then it is that God's great patience 
Holds us closest, loves us best." 



EnfiHia^n 



ISAAC AND ISBMAEL. 

Lsaac and Ishmael, sons of .Vbraham, were half- 
brothers and with their father, knew only Elohim Ye- 
hovah or Yah as Supreme Diety. All the family 
spake the same language and pronounced the name 
of the Creator alike. The name El or Elohim aj)- 
pears to be very ancient and was perhaps spoken by 
Adam and his antediluvian descendants. Isaac was 
an ancestor of the Hebrew or Jewish people, and 
Ishmael of the Arabic which are also very numerous. 
In process of time the language of these people be- 
came greatly different yet retained a likeness in many 
respects. We are able to consult both these lan- 
guages at the present day and to compare them with 
each other, one a living tongue and the other not in 
use as such. The following in Arabic is the first 
verse of the 0th chapter of Joshua which we may 
c-ompare with the same verse in the Hebrew Bil)le: 
'•^faq'ila'l lohn Uyvshaa uruJur qad sallamtu ariha vxi- 
mnlikaha fi yail.nilca wahum johohiratu'l hasalafi." 
If this were printed in Arabic characters we might 
compare: first, the name of the Deity; second, that 
of Joshua; third, the vowel signs above and below 
the consonants; fourth, the gutterals, etc.; fifth, the 
word unllamtii: sixth, Jericho; seventh, wamah'kaha; 
eight, yadniha; nmth. jobabirafu; tenth, the manner 
of writing and reading from right to left. In this 
short pa.ssage I have made ten comparisons. Surely 
Abraham's two sons did not so much resemble each 
other in f>er3on as these two languages at this distant 
day. 

Although it is probable, as I have observed, that 
Isaac and Ishmael spake the name of deity as did 
their father, we now note a difference in the Arabic 
and Hebrew, yet there is a similarit}-. Allah, AUahon 
branches from El, Elohim. If the worship of Elo- 
him saved Abraham and the Jews, dirl the worship of 
AUahon save in like manner the Ishmaelite? About 
the same idea is conveyed Vjy it to the Arabic intel- 
ligence. Why send them missionaries since they 
are alread}- devouty Why may not the Freemason's 
G. A. 0. T. U. save the Mason, since the name con- 
veys the same idea of almighty power? 

Now that worship is of divine authority which 
God institutes and reveals to man in the Gospel and 
not the worship and forms of it which the natural 
man ma}' institute for himself. We are informed by 
the Apostle John in his Gospel that if any man adds 
to or takes from the gospel revelation God shall 
take away his portion from the book of life. The 
Ishmaelite, besides changing somewhat the name 
of Deity, which may not be so important, has added 



that false and lying prophet — "God is God and 51o- 
hammed is his prophet." Here is enmity at once 
with the Christian religion. The Frecuiason and 
Odd-follow have taken from the Gospel; Christ being 
excluded. Their ritual is anti-Christ, Here is en- 
mity. Their deity at once becomes the equivalent 
of the Arabic, the l\oman, the Buddhist, the Greek, 
or any deity in all heathendom, the conception of 
which is almighty power. No Clirist, no atonement, 
no mediation, no intercession. Although the divine 
Author of the Christian religion is jealous of his own 
glory, yet you have Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian, 
Quakers, etc., in large numbers who have struck 
hands in the dark lodges with a heathenish anti- 
Christ which seeks to pervade all lands. 

1 have already said the name Elohim is modified 
in Arabic which I considered less important than 
some other things, yet what would we think of a 
Methodist or Quaker community which had adopted 
the plan of persistently calling Jesus, Joshua? in 
their prayers, sermons, and at all times calling him 
Joshua, the two words importing similarly? Zacha- 
rias, of prophetic spirit, could not name John even 
after himself, and a mighty angel descended from 
heaven and announced the name Jesus, yet suppose 
a few Methodists or Quakers call it Joshua? Would 
not even this be less enormous than to fellowship 
those accursed fraternities as some of them do which 
cast him out of ttie oath-bound lodge? 

Quaker Boy. 



ANNIFEBSABT OF JOHN THE BAPTIST. 

On a Jlasonic celebration of June 28th, called 
John the Baptist's A&y in the lodge calendar, in 
Belief ontaine, O., Eev. F. M. Foster of the Covenan- 
ter church writes thus to the Exmniner of that place:. 
In your courtesy, may we remark with reference 
to the "Anniversary of St John the Baptist? ' 

Appropriate services were held in the Lutheran 
church, June 28th. The Masons of Bellefontaine, 
who attended the church in a body, had their atten- 
tion directed to the words: "Behold the Lamb of 
God which taketh away the sin of the world," and 
"Why eateth your Master with publicans and sin- 
ners?" — texts ver}' appropriate to any occasion and 
to any class of men. 

AYhat did that anniversary service mean? Does 
it give a proper impression as the religious char- 
acter of Masonry? 

It meant nothing, in one wa}-, but a few men, who 
l)roke the Sabbath hy repairing to their lodge, at- 
tending church. In another way, it meant, by im- 
plication, that Jesus Christ is the Saviour believed 
in and worshiped by Masonry. We write to dis- 
abuse the minds of the unsophisticated as to any 
connection between Jesus and Masonr3^ The Chris- 
tians feel the necessity of doing something to free 
the order from the shame of denying Christ They 
tell the people they went to church. It is noted with 
satisfaction that they did. Right glad would every 
one be if those who are seldom out of their places on 
street corners, would go to church every Sabbath. It 
will be an occasion for universal joy when all men 
go to church. But it is to be remembered that tliat 
service in no sense represented Masonry. How do we 
know? Where is the proof? We know it from the 
words of an intelligent Mason. Prof. Henry Whit 
worth in the Examiner of March 6, said, "Jews and 
Mohammedans are equally at home with Christians 
in the order." We shall suppose that Prof. Whit- 
worth has told the truth. If he has, it is likewise 
true that the Masons in Bellefontaine attended church 
not as Masons, for the Jew and Deist would not be 
"equally at home with the Christian" while listening 
to the words, "Behold the Lamb of God which taketh 
away the sin of the world." They would be scoff'ei's. 
They would not go to a service the object of which 
was to worship Jesus the Saviour of the world. As 
a rule Jews, Deists and moralists are not hypociites. 
Further, the Masons of Bellefontaine attended 
CJkrislian service on that "anniversary" simply 
through the influence of a few Christian men. If the 
majority of the lodge had been Jews, as is the case 
in many places, that service would have been held in 
a Jewish Synagogue where the name of Jesus — the 
Christian's Redeemer and Lord — is referred to only 
as an impostor who was justly put to death. If the 
majority had been Unitarians who deny the doctrine 
of the Trinity, they would have attended a service 
where even the existence of Jesus is denied. If the 
majority had been Turks, tiicy would have "attended 
in a l)ody" a Turkish mosque, perhaps saying as they 
went, "Allah is but one God and Mohammed is his 
prophet." If the majority had been Deists, they 
would likely have had a performance on the street 
The character of the service depended upon the 
members. The few church members in the lodge 
here have tried to make an appearance of Christian- 
ity for Masonry. The disguise is apparent To de- 



clare to the world that "Jew and IMohammedan are 
equally at home with Christians in the order," and 
at the same time try to make it appear Christian is 
a chasm too broad to be successfully straddled. No. 
Masonry need never make the attempt to claim Je- 
sus as one of their objects of worship. Nor need 
they claim any of his illustrious servants as their 
Most Puissant, Sublime, Grand, Perfect, Illustrious, 
Supreme — we shall not say fools, for that would ap- 
pear to be making sport For these, earnest Chris- 
tians have neither time, money, nor inclination. 
There is more important work engaging their atten- 
tion than enticing free men behind bolted doors, 
guarded by the tyler with drawn sword, administer- 
ing an oath which invokes upon the candidate doub- 
le damnation — as in the Knight Templar degree — if 
he ever reveals, etc. It is sufficient to arouse the 
Christiau's indignation to see Masonry endeavor to 
pilot itself into public favor by claiming the illustri- 
ous followers of Jesus as members. Let the writer 
assure the reader that the diverse religions from 
which the order draws its members — Mohammedan, 
Jews, Deists, Free Thinkers, and men skeptical upon 
every form of morality and duty — make the line, of 
necessity, run back, if back it goes, through those 
other classes whose chief excited the curiosity of 
Adam and Eve bj' telling them if they would join 
they would see great things: "Your eyes shall be 
opened and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and 
evil." They joined: They fell. So does every one 
that passes behind the curtain of the lodge. He is 
now bound by oaths, and curses, and death penalties. 
This is one of the devil's schemes to hold tne world 
in subjection. But thanks be unto God that Jesus 
Christ, who charged his disciples, "If i\\ey shall say 
unto you he is in the secret chamber, believe it not," 
has come to "bring to light the hidden things of 
darkness," to "proclaim liberty to the captive and 
the opening of the prison to them that are bound." 

We mean to speak very plainly. We are interest 
ed in the spiritual welfare of the people of Bellefon- 
tain. Why is the moral tone so low? Whj' not 
more than one-third of the population in church on 
Sabbath? Why so much riding and visiting on the 
Sabbath by men who claim to be Christian? Why 
so much street-loafing by men who pretend to be 
Christian? Why do men whose names are on church 
rolls take the train on the Sabbath? Why do mem- 
bers of a church go to the postolKce on the Sabbath? 
What is it that is eating at the vitals of the Christi- 
anity of our town? There are many things. Among 
the many we mention Masonry as one of the chief. 
It teaches a religion without a Christ The worship 
of Jesus and obedience to his law may be very nice, 
but not altogether necessary. You can be a good Ma- 
son and take the train, bugg3'-ride, visit, stay away 
from church, go to the postofBce, never have family 
worship, nor secret prayer, make no pretensions to 
personal piety, etc. And while the larger number of 
the Christian members would not say "Masonry is 
a good enough religion for me," yet it is having an 
influence seriously detrimental to their souls, and is 
making of them examples which cause others to re- 
ject God's offer of salvation. This is not a conclus- 
ion hastily arrived at. It has been reached through 
five years of observation. It is so apparent that we 
are astonished that those who are interested in the 
elevation of men should in any way be connected 
with the above institution. It is carrying a serious 
responsibility. "The night is far spent, the day is 
at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of dark- 
ness, and let us put on the armour of light" Rom. 
13 12. 

But to return to our more immediate subject 
While the few Masons in Bellefontaine are attend- 
ing church, and pretending by implication that Ma- 
sonry worships Jesus, a lodge of their Jewish breth- 
ren in New York are crying "Crucify him! crucify 
iiim!" And a lodge of their Unitarian brethren 
answer there are not three persons in the Godhead. 
Take a.way your Christ! And a lodge of Deists 
casts the same in their teeth. And yet these very 
charitable Christians presume to see no inconsist 
ency. 

^ m ^ 

For want of self-restraint many men are engaged 
all their lives in fighting with difficulties of their 
own making, and rendering success impossible by 
their own cross-grained ungentleness; whilst others, 
it may be much less gifted, make their way and 
achieve success by simple patience, efpianimity, and 
self-control. — Smiles. 

Hasty conclusions are the mark of a fool; a wise 
man doubteth; a fool rageth and is confident; the 
novice saith, "I am sure that it is so;" the Ijetter 
learned answers, "Peradventure it may be so; but, I 
pray thee, inquire." It is a little learning, and but 
a little, which makes men conclude hastily. Ex- 
perience and humility teach modesty and fear. — 
Jeremy Taylor. 



October 1, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



3 



POPULARITY VERSUS PRINCIPLE. 



"Thou Shalt not contemn the public gods." For 
the man or woman whose supreme aim in life is per- 
sonal popularitj-, this is the first and great command- 
ment. These few words constitute an entire sj'stem 
of mundane ethics worthy to be inscribed in let- 
ters of gold over evexy portal to worldly recogni- 
'*>tion and success. To set at naught the law of the 
land brings judicial punishment; to defy the ruling 
fashion or opinion is to invoke a penalty yet more 
severe — social ostracism. 

No task can be more thankless than that of the 
individual who arraigns existing customs or opin- 
ions, even though, by reason of such arraignment, 
these customs and opinions are gradually reformed. 
To protest is to be unpopular; to oppose the estab- 
lished order is suicide of worldy fortune, ease and 
happiness. When Curtius threw himself into the 
yawning gulf to save his country, that act deprived 
him personally of any country to save or lose. 

One's secret opinions are one's own, but policy 
dictates that, if unpopular, they be cherished in se- 
cret. "Wherever a great soul utters its thought, 
there is Golgotha," says Heinrich Heine. It is not 
G-olgothas, it is nice, sunshinj', comfortable places 
the natural man seeks in this world. 

The safest place is on the fence. "Keep out of 
the melee," says worldly prudence. The non-com- 
mittal man is always at an advantage. In every dis- 
pute he is chosen umpire. That supposed bulwark 
of free institutions, trial by jury, recognizes this fact. 
That "intelligent juror," upon whom such precious 
stores of legal lore and eloquence are lavished in 
our courts of justice, who is called to decide such 
momentous questions, has had his present great- 
ness thrust upon him by simply declaring on oath 
that he has formed no opinion whatever on the mat- 
ter at issue. 

Next to that golden silence so vaunted by Carlyle, 
nothing so well serves the purpose of the seeker 
after popularity as a small collection of little exple- 
tives. Real words are weak in comparison with 
"Oh!" "Ah!" and "Indeed!" uttered with the appro- 
priate intonation. A judicious use of these and sim- 
ilar interjections vaa.y extricate the person who seeks 
to remain non-committal from the most perplexing 
dilemma. They bridge over the yawning chasm of 
vacuity, helping one to avoid the Sylla of partisan- 
ship on the one hand and the Charj'bdis of indiffer- 
ence on the other. These insignificant syllables may 
convey worlds of meaning and yet prove harmless 
to him who utters them. 

Becoming all things to all men and saying flatter- 
ing things to everybody, are twin arts in which the 
professionally popular man must be a virtuoso. One 
can be urbanity itself to those he at heart despises. 
"My dear sir, I am charmed to see you; you shall be 
hanged in half an hour," said in his blandest accents 
a royal governor of colonial Virginia to the leader 
of a rebellion whom he had at last succeeded in cap- 
turing. 

Treat the worst of men, if bechances tooccupj^ an 
exalted position, as if he were an angel of light, is 
one of the wisest maxims of worldly prudence. 
"When in Rome do as the Romans do," is another. 
Custom, use and fashion are only different expres- 
sions of the prevailing taste. To deviate from them 
is to set one's self up as a target for neglect and rid- 
icule. One whose chief ambition is to please, must 
be careful not to deviate one jot ft'om the conven- 
tional standards. Were he an Adonis in beauty, a 
Solomon in wisdom, or a Bayard in chivalry, he 
could not safely venture on an outre hat or coat. 
The villain is seldom suspected until he has won 
some repute for good qualities, but the man who is 
eccentric in dress or manner is condemned at the 
first glance, and soon learns that he would better vi- 
olate a law of the decalogue than a social canon. 

The great German author, Jeal Paul, whea a srug- 
gling student at Leipzig University, was ignomini- 
ously thrust out of a small summer cottage he had 
rented in a garden of the city suburbs, because una- 
ble to afford the expense of a daily hair-dresser, he 
had the courage to dispense with the queue univer- 
sally worn by gentlemen of that day. 

"De gustibus non est disputandum" is a maxim 
old and trite. Conventional laws are by no means 
like those of the Medes and Persians, and yet for 
. the time being their sovereignty is absolute. The 
private citizen whom the civil law has made neither 
judge, juryman nor executioner, exercises the func- 
tions of all three in a case of social dereliction. 
There is no tyranny like that of custom. 

One whose highest earthly aim is to please, must 
bow in abject submission to this tyranny'. He can 
afford no sacrifice, small or great. He will no more 
seek to lead in a new fashion than in a new reform. 

The connoisseur in the arts of popularity has no 
end of friends. He carefully studies human nature 



and pays due tribute to its weaknesses. To him lan- 
! guage is given not to express, but to conceal his 
^ thoughts. In visiting even the most indifferent fam- 
; ily, he inquires with an air of affectionate concern 
^ after the pet of each member, whether it be a pet 
child, a pet kitten, or a pet neuralgia. He knows 
^ that flatter}', to be effective, need be only judiciously 
I applied; he has the "art to conceal his art." He is 
sure to extol the dullest child of the household as 
the brightest, to address the young daughter, whose 
I murders of music are most shocking, as a connois- 
seur, and the one who dabbles in decorative horrors 
I as an artist. This adept in the art of pleasing 
gauges and graduates his praises according to the 
idiosyncrasies of each person, paying due regard to 
the fitness of time and place. 

The master of these varied arts of popularit}' has 
a good time in this world. No deep convictions 
trouble him, no fixed principles, no sense of moral 
responsibilit}-. To hitn there are no standards of 
truth, no laws of right or wrong. He fawns, he 
he cringes, he palavers, he cajoles. He smiles 
and smiles, even though at heart he may be a vil- 
lain. He glides on smoothly with the current or 
trims his sails to the winds. But his winning wiles 
and graces die with him. He has made no real im- 
press on the world. His renown passes like a sum- 
mer sunbeam, and his summer friends forget him. 
It were worse than folly to decry these outward 
graces that lend such charm to life. When united 
with inward worth, they make the perfect man. 
"People are like bullets," says Jean Paul. "The 
smoother they are the further they go." Other things 
being equal, the suave Chesterfields are greatly to 
be preferred to the bearish Carlyles. But it is not 
these superficial traits which make up Lord Chester- 
field's heartless code of life and manners, thatenlight 
en, renovate and save humanity. Character must 
form the basis of every true ancl noble life. They 
whose names come down to us as educators and re- 
formers, as prophets and martyrs, have formed their 
lives after higher models than the shifting phases 
of current fashion or opinion. They have had their 
reward, — ignominy in their own da^', apotheosis in 
ours. 

"They were stoned, the}' were sawn asunder, were 
tempted, were slain with the sword; they wandered 
about in sheep-skins, and goat-skins, being destitute, 
afllicled, tormented." Thus writes the great apostle 
of an elect company "of whom the world was not 
worthy," he himself soon to be enrolled with the 
number of those who having fought the good fight 
and kept the faith, had passed through martyrdom 
to their reward. 

Socrates, for contemning the false gods of his time, 
drank the deadly hemlock. Luther, denounced by 
the popular voice as antichrist, did not have a 
smooth, flowing pathway through tliis world. Dan- 
te wrote his divine drama amid the woes of exile. 
The great truth discovered by Galileo was in his own 
day deemed heresy worthy of death. Savonarola, 
Calvin, Knox and Wesley were popular only with 
what the world called a dissenting rabble. Within 
the memory of a generation still living the name of 
Abolitionists was a stigma, while slavery in the pop- 
ular regard, was a divine institution. 

The age of martyrdom for opinion's sake is over; 
the tyranny that now awes and subjects men is not 
that of church or state; it is the tyranny of estab- 
lished usage and custom. There are yet many pop- 
ular idols, and woe to the iconoclast who would break 
or desecrate them ! 

Great questions yet confront the world. Great 
moral and intellectual battles are yet to be fought 
and won. Never was there more need of character, 
courage and principle than now. Yet, let him who 
attempts that unpopular role of reformer be sure of 
his calling and of the sincerity of his motives; sure 
that he is opposing real evils, and not running a 
senseless tilt against wind-mills. Let him begin his 
work with a reform of self. Conventional usage is 
not a thing to be despised. Worldly applause and 
popularity are pleasant things. But they are not 
the things most worth striving for, not the measure 
of the noblest lives. While the shallow, baseless re- 
nown of the time-server passes with him, that of the 
hero of conviction and duty goes on assuming grand- 
er proportions from age to age. — Francis A. iShaw, 
in the Interior. 

— The National Conference of churches receives 
continually more and better endorsement. The In- 
diana Wesleyau conference have added to the list of 
delegates appointed; the Whitewater United Breth- 
ren conference has also appointed a delegation. Dr. 
GiflTord, a prominent Baptist pastor of Boston, en- 
dorses the proposition and will co-operate as much as 
possible. Dr. A. J. Gordon, of the same city, is op- 
posed to all secret societies, but will not be able to 
attend the conference. 



TEE RIOHT OF WOMEN TO PREACH. 



Our conservative Congregational brethren have 
recently ordained a woman to preach the Gospel. 
For many years among the Quakers, Baptists and 
Methodists, women have preached with marked ac- 
ceptance and good results. 1 Cor. 14: 34—3.5, and 
1st Tim. 2: 12 have of ten been qouted as forbidding 
women to take part in public worship. Careful 
scholarship, however, has discovered a difference in 
meaning between the Greek words lahin, and didas- 
kein, which acts were forbidden to women in the 
church, and jirojylieetueine which was permitted and 
even encouraged. It is claimed that- Paul only meant 
to advise the over-zealous Corinthian women not to 
turn the prayer meeting into a debating societj'. First 
Cor. 11: 5 shows clearly that he was willing women 
should both pray and prophesy if they would only 
do so with propriety. Much mischief has often been 
done by wresting one or two passages of Scripture 
so as to make them teach a false doctrine. The Bi- 
ble teaches no unreasonable thing and its direction 
on any subject is discovered by taking it has a whole 
and not hy magnifying and distorting one or two 
verses. 



SOME PERSONAL EXPERIENCES. 



"I used to sell badges and sashes in this city," 
remarked one of the men recently reclaimed from 
strong drink. 

"What kind of badges?" 

"Why," said he, "the badges of secret .societies." 

"Do you think your connection with these socie- 
ties had anything to do with your becoming a drunk- 
ard?" we inquired. 

"I presume it had," said he. "The night I joined 
the Knights of Pythias, I didn't get home till three 
o'clock in the morning. When my initiation was 
over, the boys said 'Let's go and have a drink." This 
was the way that lodge nights generally ended. 
When I got home that night my wife said, 

"If this is the way the Knights of Pythias do, you 
have had enough of it." 

"I noticed the same custom with the Odd-fellows, 
and, in fact, with all the secret societies to which I 
belonged. This is the worst thing I know about 
them. After the lodge meetings, the members go to 
the saloons and drink and play cards and billiards. 
Many of them also went to houses of ill fame. I 
knew many married men to do this when their wives 
supposed they were detained at the lodge. Yes, men 
get bad habits by such societies. It is hard for a 
man to resist the invitation to drink with his lodge 
companions." 

To our astonishment this man stated without any 
question to suggest it that one great objection to 
these lodges was that they rejected Christ. This 
fact he observed while attending the meetings. — 
American. 



FREE THINKERS WANT RECOGNITION. 



The Free Thinkers have been holding a conven- 
tion in Albany. We were honored with a special in- 
vitation to be present, inclosing a card entitling us 
to a seat of honor. But the .topics announced and 
the names of the speakers did not attract us to this 
convention, and the reports of the secular press lead 
us to pity the poor creatures that went to Albany to 
endure the infliction of such brainless and blasphe- 
mous utterances as were there heard. One of the 
resolutions discussed and adopted was this: 

That it is time for liberal and secular societies to take the place 
of churches and priests in the social recogcition and celebration 
of those great events of human life — birth, marriage and death. 

We were not aware that "churches and priests" 
had anything especially to do with the first named 
great event of human life. This is generally sup- 
posed to be the special province of the medical pro- 
fession. As to "marriage and death" we should 
think it was "about time" that they received recog- 
nition from these "liberal and secular societies." 
They certainly have shown a surprising indifference 
to the one and a conspicuous carelessness as to the 
other. — Baptist Weekly. 

Luther on Choosing a College. — "I am much 
afraid," said Martin Luther in his appeal to the 
Emperor and Christian nobility of the German na- 
tion, "that the universities will prove to be the great 
gates of hell, unless they diligently labor in explain- 
ing the Holy Scriptures, and engraving them in the 
hearts of youth. I advise no one to place his child 
where the Scriptures do not reign paramount. 
Every institution in which men are not unceasingly 
occupied with the Word of God must become cor- 
rupt." 



LJf 



imM 



THE CHRISTIAN CYKOStTRE, 



October 1, 1885 



LODGE CSABJ FT ASB ly TIMID A 11 OX IX S T. 
PAUL. 



St. Paul, Miun. 

EiuTOR Christian Cynoscre: — Keoeutly I do- 
liveroil a rcview of the sermons of the Jaoksou 
street M. E. pastor on Fi-eeiuasoury aud Odd-fellow- 
ship. The Pione<fr Pnss reporter called it -a scath- 
ing diairil>e." Now that is just what anyone nnght 
think upon he^iring the whole truth about these or- 
ders for the fii-st time. That is just what that re- 
ix>rter thought and said. Probably he has never 
been lodge-demonizeii and mesmerized. 

That kxlge --prelate," the Jackson street M. E. 
pastor. I consider, insultevi the widows and orphans 
of Odd-fellows when he fixed the brand of charity 
objects upon them for receiving a cord of wood and 
a pair of shoes from the Odd-fellows; because if the 
husb;\nd and father had not paid the Odd-fellows 
for the woov.i and shoes before he died they would 
not have ret.'eived them, and not even then had he 
failetl to pay his last months lodge dues. The de- 
cision of the Grand Lodge of this State is that if 
the Odd-fellow has not paid his dues for the month 
previous to his disability he is not to receive any 
benefits. And in the face of this the Odd-fellow 
stands in the Methodist pulpit and blows his trump- 
et thus, we, "The Odd-fellows h'ive spent thirty mil- 
lions in charity." Is not that an insult to every dis- 
abled Odd-fellow, and every Odd-fellow's widow and 
orphan who receive benefits from the lodge? Why 
should their orphans be branded as --charity boys," 
and --charity girls, " when that pastor carries them a 
pair of shoes purchased out of the money their 
father gave the pastor before he died? He said, 
--<Jdd-fellowship. by its charities, puts the church to 
shame." Is he trying to serve two masters? Which 
would he ser\-e. Odd-fellowship or the church? 
Boasting of his Odd-fellowism, he saj-s, --To carr^- 
a widow a cord of wood, to put shoes on the 
orphan's feet, is a greatness that stamps the mean- 
ness out of us." But how does it appear that the 
Odd-feUow is any greater than a faithful errand boy 
or a clerk in a shoe store? It seems to me that he 
is more like a confidence operator, tr3'ing to inveigle 
people into his secret lodge worship. Christian 
charity is described by Christ thus: '-Lord, hoping 
for nothing again" (Luke 6: 35); but of sinners he 
says. --Sinners lend to sinners, to receive as much 
again." v. 34. It seems to me that Masons and 
Odd-feUows do as sinners do and call it charity. 

In Su Paul we are building a new court house, 

and the Freemasons want to dedicate it to i^agauism 

by laying the comer-stone. Man}- of the people do 

not like it. But the pulpit and press are so badl}- 

snared by the secret lodges that thej- dare not allow 

an honest protest against it. And it seems likelj" 

that the spirit of Balaam will have its own way. 

Last evening I handed a few lines to the clerk of 

the Pioneer Press upon the subject, and paid him 

.*1.35 to put it in the place for announcements, but 

instead there was an announcement as follows: 

iLiiONic— A re^lar communication of Ancient Landniark 
Lodge No. ^> will be held in Masonic Hall tbis evening. Work 
in the E. A. degree. By order of the W. M." 

My lines were as follows: 

"If the Masonic fraternity is permitted to lay the corner-stone 
of the court house, it h suggested that they be required to place 
in their box a history of the abduction and murder of William 
Morgan: also the obligations and penalties of the Masonic de- 
grees; and to cut the obligations and penalties of the Royal 
Arch degree on the outside of the comer-stone." 

To-day the clerk of the Pioneer Press return.'? it to 
me with the money, and sajs they could not print it. 
Possibly it would not have pleased the Masons to 
see that under their announcement, and in the 
Pioneer Pre^s. And yet it is a well established his- 
torical fact that the Masons did murder William 
Morgan for writing the secrets of Masonry; and the 
obligations and penalties of the Masonic degrees are 
well known to all the world. The Pioneer Press in 
its report of my sermon called the secrets "damn- 
able." I did not use that word, but they did. 

And now at this very hour the Masons are charg- 
ing a citizen of St Paul with some of those secrets; 
they are bewildering a man with a false worship 
consisting of lying myths and false promises of a 
mock salvation. And in an act of worship they will 
sw-ear him to be brutally murdered if he fails to for- 
ever conceal from us what we all know. (See "Ecce 
Orienti," compared with "Freema-sonr}- Illustrated;" 
subject, Entered Aj>prentice degree.) The pulpit 
and the press of St Paul can advertise and encour- 
age that, but they are such moral cowards that they 
dare not allow any discussion about it wherein they 
would be at all implicated as against 3Ia.sonry. 

Surely every Chri*ian ought to feel full of the 
tcnderest sympathy for the poor bound Mason and 
Odd-fellow. Even as Christ felt for those whom he 
addressed, when he said, "Ye serpents, ye vipers, 
how can ye escape the damnation of hell?" Since 
my dream, that I had joined the Freemasons, I can 



sympathize with them as ucn er before, knowing now 
what they must experience if they ever come to re- 
pentance. 

It is true that the Freemason is a sworn sinner, 
and that of a very dangerous kind; but it is as easy 
for Ood to forgive one pardonable sin as another, 
and if the Freemason will exercise repentance and 
break his obligation he will find the yoke of Jesus 
quite as easy and his burden quite as light as does 
an_v other pardoned sinner. Ministers ought to 
preach salvation to ^lasons and Odd-fellows just as 
freely and just as tenderlj- as to any other class of 
sinners. But there is not an English-speaking- 
church in the city, except the Roman church, that 
dares to treat Freemasonry as a sin. Nor is there a 
newspaper, printed iu the English language, in the 
city that dares question the goodness of the secret 
orders, but they will speak iu praise of the secret 
orders. They seem to think they have nothing to 
fear from God and the Anti-masons; but they fear 
much from the secretists, where there would be 
nothing to fear if thej- were men of God. 

W. Fenton. 



PITH AND POINT. 



NO LONGER A GRANGER. 

Success to you in your grand work of opposing the 
"unfruitful works of darkness." I was for five years a 
Granger, but withdrew last November. I am convinced 
that secrecy is a great hindrance to the cause of religion. 
— John W. Claypool, Ft. Spring, W. Va. 

THE SECRECY OP THE SONS OP TEMPERANCE ORDER. 

In answer to J. C. Young in your last issue, I would say 
the whole work of the S. of T. is as much a secret as the 
pass-word. It is often asserted by members that there are 
no secrets. The same is said of the G. A. R. The Prohi- 
bition convention in this State was presided over by a 
prominent Mason, and many of the workers are members 
of secret orders. I do not know the standing of the nomi- 
nees, but can we trust them when the reins are drawn by 
Masons'? I would like to get an expose of the Foresters; 
is there such a book in print? — W. E. Mace, Boston, 
Mass. 

There is none. The Cynosure would like information 
from any of its readers respecting this order, or any other 
of the minor orders, so-called, for use in a series of de- 
scriptive articles of the different lodges. 

THE TWO bonds OF THE NEGRO. 

I wish to say that I am glad to see your position toward 
secret societies. I believe these and intemperance are the 
things that hold us down as a race more than anything 
else, and there is no paper in the land that is doing more 
good in the South than yours. There are a few of my 
members who belong to the lodge. I wish it was in your 
power to send me a copy ot two each week to give to such 
members so that they may be able to see such action as is 
taken by the Baptists in Tennessee and in Mississippi. 
Can you do this and help the cause on here in Texas? 
The lodge is quite young here. I would pay for the pa- 
pers for these members if I was able to do so, but am not, 
and if they have to pay for them they won't get them and 
therefore will not read them. If you can send the papers 
please let me know and I shall send you the names. Yours 
in the good cause. — J. R. McLean, Paris, Texas. 

Who will help this brother? The fund for sending the 
Cynosure to colored pastors should have the prayers and 
gifts of thousands. Who has a portion of the Lord's 
money for this cause? 



BIBLE Lessons. 



line Hour for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a 
shekel." But the scolhng lord whose words of unbelief 
must have added terribly to the general despair was tram- 
pled under the feet of the famine-stricken crowd. His 
punishment was just He had poisoned the springs of 
hope for the starving populace. But what shall be the 
doom of those who poison the fountains of heavenly 
hope? — who by their sneers, open or covert, keep away 
starving souls from the Gospel feast. Unbelief is dan- 
gerous. Obstructionists in the path of God's divine plans 
must expect to be swept away in their resistless march. 

3. Qod chooses to benefit the world through humble in- 
struments, vs. 8-16. Says a certain writer: "The grand- 
est revolutions in the history of the universe have been 
accomplished by its beggars, and, as the world thought, 
its fools." It is given to four outcast lepers to be the 
bearers of life to the perishing city. God's purposes of 
evil have generally been worked out by some imperial or 
kingly monster — a Louis XIV. or a Catherine De Medicis; 
while, on the other hand, when the whole race is to be 
regenerated and lifted up, Luther emerges from a miner's 
hut, the apostles from fishermen's boats^ and the divine 
Son of God himself from a manger. The lepers did not 
keep the good news to themselves, but carried it at once 
to their famishing fellow-citizens. How much more 
should every man and woman saved by the blood of Jesus 
feel it incumbent upon them to tell others the glad tidings 
of great joy. It is not opportunity we need, but the 
heart and the will. The Christian's indifference is a 
greater obstacle to the conversion of the world than the 
scoff of the infidel. 

LIGHT FROM THE WORD. 

Why is it perfectly reasonable to believe that God can 
do all things? Prov. 21: l;Ps. 50: 10. What must be 
the fate of those who try to obstruct his great plan of 
salvation? Luke 20: 18. 



FOURTH QUARTER. 

STUDIES IN THE KINGS AND PROPHETS. 

LESSON II. Oct. 11, 1885.— The famine in Samaria. 2 Kings 
7: 1-17. 

GOLDEN TEXT.— The things which are impossible with men 
are possible with God. Luke 18 : 27. 

\0jje7i. the Bible aivd read the leHKwi.'\ 

COMMENTS ON THE LESSON BY E. E. FLAGG. 
1. Ood's 'promises are generally fulfilled through vn- 
thought of agencie-t. vs. 1-7. The courtier who met Eli- 
sha's prophecy with blasphemous unbelief has many coun- 
terparts. Men forget that God's plans are like his com- 
mandments, "exceeding broad;" and so they say, "Impos- 
sible!" when reformers prophesy the extinction of great 
evils like Masonry and intemperance. They forget that 
he has his hand on the motive-springs of human action, 
and can bring about the most astonishing results in the 
simplest and most natural way. It was true that even if 
the enemy raised the siege, the countr}' foraged for miles 
around could never supply in twenty-four hours such in- 
credible plenty; but the Lord did not need to work a mir- 
acle — only to send a sudden panic through the Syrian 
hosts. Formidable as are the hosts of evil, God has al- 
ways at means at hand for their discomforture. The ter- 
rified and bewildered army left all their rich stores be- 
hind, and Elisha's words were verified — "a measure of 



The Siege op Samaria. — Benhadad, the king of Syria, 
soon collected another great army and came up from Da- 
mascus, with the evident intention of bubjugating the 
whole country. Being resistless in the field, he soon shut 
up the king of Israel with his army in Samaria, the capi- 
tal, and besieged the city. This was the fourth time that 
he had attacked the king of Israel with great force (1 
Kings 20: 1, 26. 22: 29-31), and the second time that he 
had besieged Samaria (1 Kings 20: 1.) — Todd. 

"There were four leprous men." Men with the lep- 
rousy. 

"At the entering in of the gate." At the gateway, sep- 
arated from human society, according to the law in Lev. 
13: 46; Num. 5: 3, probably in a building erected for the 
purpose (comp. chap. 15: 5), just as at the present day 
the lepers at Jerusalem have their huts by the side of the 
Zion gate. — keil. 

-'The Egyptians." From the south. The sound seemed 
to the Syrians to come from both directions. Rationalists 
have endeavored to account for it by natural causes, such 
as unusual sounds heard on the mountains or in the 
depths of the valleys, produced by winds or approaching 
tempests; but this comes very much to the same thing. 
The great wonder or miracle is in the spiritual effect pro- 
duced. We might regard it as an event produced solely 
by physical causes, were it not for what is expressly told 
us in ver. G. It was the supernatural using the natural as 
its means. The strangeness is in the terrible nature of 
its results. — Tayler Lewis. 

"We do not well." Their consciences were soon aroused 
so that they said, "We are not doing right; for it is the 
duty of citizens to make known things relating to public 
safety." — Orotius. 

How uncertain life is and its enjoyment! Honor and 
power cannot secure men from sudden and inglorious 
deaths. He whom the king leaned on, the people trod 
on; he who fancied himself the stay and support of the 
government is trampled under foot as the mire in the 
streets; thus hath the pride of men's glory been often 
stained. — Henry. 



— The Hamilton County (Ohio) Prohibition convention 
voted in favor of open methods. 

— The recent negotiations between China and Japan 
relating to Corea were conducted entirely in English on 
account of the definiteness of its terms. 

—Rum and lodge governed Boston a few months ago 
arrested several street preachers, but did not dare to press 
the issue and street preaching has occurred every pleasant 
Sabbath since. 

— Dr. Pentecost said at the late Moody convention: 
"Sanctification is the result of union in communion with 
Christ, also the hope of Christ's return. The last is the 
most powerful incentive to holiness, the mightiest stimu- 
lus to sanctification that we have." 

— Past Grand Bourlet makes the announcement to his 
brethren that during the past twenty years 354,258 Odd- 
fellows have been suspended. Most of these poor fellows 
were "hung" for not being able or willing to pay their 
dues. We congratulate these ex-lodge men on their es- 
cape, but it is a somewhat sad reflection that they left 
about $20,000,000 in the lodge till. 



October 1, 1885 



THE CHEISTLOT CYNOSTJES. 



ANTI-MASONIC LEGTURSR8. 

General Agent and Lecturer, J. P. 
Stoddard, 221 West Madison street, Chi- 
cago. 

H. H. Hinman, Willimantic, Conn. 
State Agents. 

Illinois, Geo. T. Dissette, Cynosure of- 
fice. 

Indiana, 8. L. Cook of Albion 

Mich., A. H. Springstein, Warren. 

Missouri, M. N. Butler, Burlington June. 

Minn., J. P. Richards, care Prof. Paine, 
Wasioja. 

New York, W. B. Stoddard, Dale. 

Wisconsin, Isaac Bancroft, Monroe 

Kansas, Robert Loggan, Clifton. 

Degree Workers. — [8eceders."| 
J. K. Glassford, Carthage, Mo. 

D. P. Rathbun, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Other Lecturers. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
N. Callender, Thompson, Pa. 
J H. Tlmmons, Tarentum, Pa 
J. H. Balrd, Templeton, Pa. 
T. B. McCormlck, Princeton, Ind. 

E. Johnson, Dayton, Ind. 

H. A. Day, Williamstown, Mich. 

J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 

A. Mayn, Bloomington, Ind. 

J. B. Cressinger, SuUivan, O. 

W. M. Love, Osceola, Mo. 

A. D. Freeman, Downers Grove, 111 

E. Mathews, Spring Arbor, Mich. 

Wm. Fenton St Paul, Minn. 

E. I. GrinneU, Blalrsburg, Iowa. 

Warren Taylor, South Salem, O. 

J. S. Perry, Thompson, Conn. 

C. F. Hawley, Wheaton, 111. 

J. T. Michael, New Wilmington, Pa. 

8. C. Kimball, New Market, N. H. 

8. G. Barton, Breckinridge, Mo. 

Joel H. Austin, Goshen, Ind. 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

E. Barnetson, Jackson Valley, Pa. 

Wm. R. Roach, Pickering, Ont. 

n IK. RifhardF, Brighton, Mich. 

R. J. Williams, Winnebago City, Minn. 



A Wonderful Woman, 

A Wonderful Life, 

AND 

A Wonderful Book. 

Laura S. Haviland is a quiet, gentle, 
unassuming Quaker woman, 76 years Df 
age, yet vigorous, wt>-o has had a remark- 
able career of usefuiiess, and has now 
given to the world a remarkable history 
of her "Life Work" as a teacher, at an 
early day, of the colored refugees in 
Canada and in Michigan, and in other 
States, as a traveler down South in the 
guise of a "berry picker," helping out 
into freedom many slaves; as a nurse and 
preacher to the sufferers in hospitals dur- 
ing the war; and with Gov. St. John and 
Flizabeth Comstock, relieving the desti- 
tute and suffering refugees in Kansas, 
etc. 

Her book is neither fiction nor found- 
ed on fiction, but is an interesting narra- 
tion of facts of a most thrilling charac- 
ter, as every one will find and testify who 
will get and read her book, now on sale 
at the Cynosure ofiice, 321 W. Madison 
St., Chicago, 111. Price, cloth, $1,75; 
half Russia, $2.25, 

A WOMAN'S VICTORY; 

OR 

THE QUERY OF THE LODGEVILLE 
CHURCH 



The American Party. 



First Nomination for President at Oberlin, 
Ohio, May 23, 1872. 

Platform Adopted at Chicago, June 28, 
1873. 

Name Adopted at Syracuse, N. Y., June 3, 
1874. 

PRESIDENTAL CANDIDATES : 

1873— Charles Francis Adams and Joseph L. 
Barlow. 

1876 — James B. Walker and Donald Kirkpat- 
rick. 

1880— J. W. Phelps and Samuel C. Pomeroy. 

18S4— J . Blanchard and J. W. Conant nomi- 
nated; the former withdrawing, Samuel C. 
Pomeroy was nominated. Both nominees with- 
drawing, the support of the party was generally 
given to John P. St. John and William Daniel, 
candidates of the Prohibition party. 

national committee. 

F. W. Oapwell, New York ■,J. A. ijonaid, Con- 
necticut; E. O. Paine. Minnesota; O. W. Nee- 
deh, Missouri; E. D. Bailey, District of Colum- 
bia {Ex. Com.) James Kennedy, California; 
Robert Hardie, Dakota; J. F. Galloway, Flori- 
da; L. N. StrattoD, Illinois; Israel Hess, Indi- 
ana; J. N. Norris Iowa; H. Curtis, Kansas, S. 
A. Pratt, Massachusetts; H. A. Day, Michigan ; 
E. Tapley, Mississippi; S. C. Kimball, New 
Hampshire; Robert Armstrong. New Jersey; 
E. A. Foldstrom, Nebraska; J. M. Scott, Ohio; 
Wm. H. Pruett, Oregon; A. M, Paull, Rhode 
Island; J. W. Moss, West Virginia; M. R. Brit- 
ten, Wisconsin. 

AMERICAN PLA TFORM. 



BY JENNIE L. HARDIE. 

This simple and touching story which 
was lately published in the Gyno 
sure is now ready for orders in a beautiful 
pamphlet. It is worth reading by every 
Anti-mason —and especially by his wife 
GJet it and take it home to cheer the heart 
of your companion who may desire to do 
something for Christ against great evils, 
but is discouraged from making any pub- 
lic effort. Prick, fifteen cents. Ten 
for a dollar 



ADOPTED AT CHICAGO, JUNE 20, 1884. 



Viewing with deep concern the corrupt and 
unsettled condition of American politics, and 
witnessing with alarm the fearful prevalence of 
caste and clannishuess by which our citizens 
are being arrayed in hostile bands, working se- 
cretly to compass political ends, a method di- 
rectly and powerfully tending to increase cor- 
ruption, to destroy mutual confidence, and 
hasten disruption and bloodshed ; and having 
no hope of adequate remedy for these evils 
from existing parties, and believing the foun- 
dation of a party based upon the fundamental 
principles of the Declaration of American In- 
dependence, both inevitable and indispensable : 

We, therefore, a portion of the American 
people, believing with our fathers that we have 
our rights and liberties, not from men or par- 
ties, but from God ; believing in the Chi-istian 
marriage, and not in Mormonism; believing in 
the religious democracy of the New Testament, 
and not in the despotism of the lodge ; believ- 
ing, also, with our Scotch and English ancest- 
ors, that civil government, though ordained in 
God, is "founded in nature, not in grace," and, 
therefore, that all have equal civil rights ; while 
we abhor the idea of enforcing religion or con- 
trolling conscience by human laws and penal- 
ties as calculated to make hypocrites, not 
Christians, and savoring of the days of priest- 
ism, the fagot and the stake, we at the same 
time as firmly believe that atheism and priest- 
craft are twins and both alike foes to human 
liberty and welfare. We further most firmly 
believe that a government without God has 
none but lynch power, and is destitute of all 
legitimate authority to maintain civil order, to 
swear a witness, to try a criminal, to hang a 
murderer, to imprison a thief; and while we 
consider government without God as a mere 
usurpation, we regard all religions and wor- 
ships invented by men, and so having no high- 
er than human origin, as mere swindling impo- 
sitions and cheats. We believe in peace and in 
national arbitration as a means of perpetuating 
it; yet we as profoundly believe that the 
bravery and blood of our soldiers have bought 
us the peace which we enjoy, and we honor 
the memories of the dead and will be just to 
the claims of the living; and we take up and 
prolong the strain raised by the women of this 
country: "For God, and home, and native 
land," and trust that this beautiful and patri- 
otic motto will soon be not only echoed by their 
voices, but sustained by their votes. 

We, therefore, solemnly adopt and present 
the following, as containing a brief synopsis of 
the principles of our government, by which we 
intend to be governed in casting our votes. We 
hold: 

I. That ours is a Christian and not a heathen 
nation, and that the God of the Christian Scrip- 
tures is the author of civil government. 

3. That the Bible should be associated witli 
books of science and literature in all our edu- 
cational institutions. 

3. That God requires, and man needs a Sab- 
bath. 

4. \Ye demand the prohibition of the impor- 
tation, manufacture, and sale of intoxicating 
drinks. 

5. We hold that the charters of all secret 
lodges granted by our Federal and State Legis- 
latures should be withdrawn, and their oaths 
prohibited by law. 

6. We are opposed to putting prison labor or 
depreciated contract labor from foreign coun- 
tries in competition with free labor to benefit 
manufacturers, corporations or speculators. 

7. We are in favor of a revision and enforce- 
ment of the laws concerning patents and inven- 
tions; for the prevention and punishment of 
frauds either upon inventors or the general 
public. 

8. We hold to and will vote for woman suf- 
frage. 

9. That the civil equality secured to all 
American ci'izens by Articles 13, 14 and 15 of 
our amended National Constitution should be 
preserved Inviolate, and the same equaliiy 
should be extended to Indians and Chinamen. 

10. That international differences should be 
settled by arbitration. 

II. That land and other monopolies should 
be discouraged. 

• 13. That the general government should fur- 
nish the people with nt. ampl» tjad aausid cur- 
rency. 



13. That It should be the settled policy of the 
government to reduce tarifis and taxes as rap- 
idly as the necessities of revenue and vested 
business interests will allow. 

14. That polygamy should be immediately 
suppressed by law, and that the Republican 
party is censurable for the long neglect of its 
duty in respect to this evil. 

15. And, finally, we demand for the Ameri- 
can people the abolition of electoral colleges, 
and a direct vote for President and Vice Presi 
dent of the United States. 



THE CHUIWHEB VS. LOIf^'^BY. 

The following denominations are com- 
mitted by vote of their legislative assem- 
blies or by constitution to a separation 
from secret lodge worship: 

Adventists (Seventh-day.) 

Baptists — Primitive, Seventh-day and 
Scandinavian. 

Brethren (Dunkers ov German Bap- 
tists.) 

Christian Reformed Church. 

ChAircli of God ^Northern Indiana El 
dership.) 

Congregational — Tne State Associations 
of Illinois and Iowa have adopted resolu- 
tions against the lodge. 

Disciples (in part.) 

Friends. 

Lutherans — Norwegian, Danish, Swed- 
ish and Synodical Conferences. 

Mennonites. 

Methodists — Free and Wesleyan. 

Methodist Protestant (Minnesota Con 
ference.) 

Moravians. 

Plymouth Brethren. 

Presbyterian — Associate, Reformed and 
United.^ 

Reformed Church (Holland Branch.) 

United Brethren in Christ. 

Individual churches in some of these 
denominations should be excepted, in part 
of them even a considerable portion. 

The following local churches have, as a 
pledge to disfellowshlp and oppose lodge 
worship, given their names to the follow- 
ing list as 

THE ASSOCIATED CHURCHES OF CHRIST. 

New Ruhamah Cong. Hamilton, Miss, 

Pleasant Ridge Cong. Sandford Co. Ala. 

New Hope Methodist, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Congregational, College Springs, Iowa. 

College Church of Christ, ^Vheaton, 111. 

First Congregational, Leland, Mich. 

Sugii.r Grove Church, Green county. Pa. 

Military Chapel, M. E., Lowndes county, 
Miss. 

Hopewell Missionary Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Cedar Grove Miss. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Simon's Chapel, M. E., Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Misc. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Brownlee Church, Caledonia, Miss. 

Salem Church, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

West Preston Bantist Church, Wayne Co., Pa. 

OTHER LOCAL CHURCHES 

adopting the same principle are — 

Baptist churches : N. Abington, Pa. ; Meno- 
mouie, Mondovi, Waubeck and Spring Prairie, 
Wis. ; Wheaton, 111. ; Perry, N. Y. ; Spring 
Creek, near Burlington, Iowa ; Lima, Ind. ; 
Constableville, N. Y. The "Good Will Associ- 
ton" of Mobile, Ala., comprising some twenty- 
five colored Baptist churches; Bridgewater 
Baptist Association, Pa. ; Old Tebo Baptist, 
near Leesville, Henry Co., Mo. ; Hoopeston, 111 ; 
Esmen, 111. ; Strykersville, N. Y. 

Congregational churches : 1st of Oberlin, O. ; 
Tonica, Crystal Lake, Union and Big Woods, 
lU. ; Solsbury, Ind. ; Congregational Methodist 
Maplewood, Mass. 

Independent churches In LoweU, Country- 
man school house near Lindenwood, Merengo 
and Streator, 111. ; Berea and Camp Nelson, Ky ; 
Ustick, 111. ; Clarksburg, Kansas; State Associ- 
ation of Ministers and Churches of Christ in 
Kentucki. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS 

Who depend on voluntary contributions 
of Christian people in whole or in part 
for their support: 

J. F. Browns;, Berea, Ky. 

Eli Tapley, Columbus, Miss. 

J. F. Galloway, Okahumka Florida. 

Wm. Hazenburg, Cape Town, S. 
Africa, 

A. D. Zaraphonithes, Andros, Greece. 

C. B. Ward, Secunderabad, India. 

The Evangelists associated with Rev. 
John G. Fee, of Berea, Ky. 

Contributions for either of these breth 
ren may be forwarded through the Treas- 
urer of the N. C. A. Please designate 
to which one such funds shall be sent. 



Inqairies concerning articles advertised 
Ids this paper, will coafer a favor by stat 
lag th&t they s&w the advertisemeat it 
«fe6 CSMISTIAN CYNOSURE. 




N. C. A. BUILDING AND OFFICE OF 
THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 
321 WEST MADISON STREET, CHICAGO 



NA TIONAL VEliia TIANASSUCIA TlOh 

President.— F. W. Capwell, Dale, N.Y. 

Vice-president — Rev. W. T. Meloy, 
D.D., Chicago. 

Rec. Sec'y.— W. I. Phillips. 
Cor. Sec'y and Geneal Agent. — J. 
P. Stoddard, 221 W. Madison st., Chicago. 

Treasurer.— W. I. Phillips, 221 W. 
Madison Street, Chicago. 

Directors. — Alexander Thomson, M 
R. Britten, John Gardner, J. L. Barlow, 
Joseph Travis, William Moerdyk, O. F. 
Lumry, M. C. Ranseen. L. N. Stratton, 
Thos. H. Gault, C. A. Blanchard. 

The object of this Association Is: 
"To expose, withstand and remove -jccret 
societies, Freemasonry in particular, and othe? 
anti-Christian movements, in order to save the 
churches of Christ from being depraved, to re- 
deem the admiuistr? 'ion of justice from per- 
version, and our r'^p .blican government from 
corruption." 

To carry on this work contributions are 
solicited from every friend of tne reform. 

Form of Bequest. — I give and bequeath to 
the National Christian Association, incorpo- 
rated and existing under the laws of the State 

of Illinois, the sum of dollars for the 

purposes of said Association, and for which 
the receipt of its Treasurer for the time being 
"SJall be sufficient discharae. 

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

President. — Rev. S. Collins, D. D 
Secretaries. — Rev. S. A. George. H. 
L. Kellogg and M. N. Butler. 

STATE auxiliary ASSOCIATIONS 

Alabama.— Pres.jW. A. McAlplne; Sec., G 
M. Elliott; Treas., E. Fishel, all of Selma. 

California.— Pres., L. B. Lathrop, Hollls- 
ter; Cor. Sec., Mrs. IJ. P. MerrOl, Woodland; 
Treas., C. Ruddock, Woodland. 

Connecticut. — Pres., J. A. Conant, Willi- 
mantic; Sec, Geo. Smith, WillimaD tic; Treas., 
C. T. Collins, Windsor. 

Illinois. — Pres., Wm. H. Chandler, Dover; 
Sec, H. L. Kellogg; Treas., W. I. Phillips, 
Cmuisure office. 

Indiana.— Pres.-, William H. Figg, Reno- 
Sec, S. L. Cook, Albion; Treas., Benj. LHsh 
Silver Lake. 

Iowa. — Pres., Geo. Warrington, Birming- 
ham; Rec. Sec, A. W. Hall, College Springs; 
Cor. Sec, T. C. Maughhn, Washington; 
Treas., J. A. Laird, Wayne. 

Kansas.— Pres., J. P. Richards, Ft. Scott; 
Sec, W. W. McMillen, Olathe; Treas., S. 
Alexander, Linden. 

Massachus tts.— Pres., S. A. Pratt ; Sec, 
Mrs. E. D. Bailey; Treas., David MannIng,Sr. ; 
all of Worcester. 

Michigan.— Pres., D. A. Richards, Brighton ; 
Sec'y, H. A. Day, Wilhamstown; Treas., 
Geo. Swanson, Jr., Jackson. 

Minnesota. — Pres., E. G. Paine, Wasioja 
Cor. Sec, W. H. McChesney, Fairmont; Rec. 
Sec'y, Thos. Hartley, Richland; Treas., Wm. 
H. Morrill, St. Charles. 

Missouri.— Pres., C. J. Kephart, Avalon 
Treas., William Beauchamp, Avalon ; Cor. Sec. 
M. N. Butler 

Nebraska. — Pres., S. Austin, Fairmount, 
Cor. Sec, W. S. Spooner, Kearney; Treas 
J. C. Fye. 

New Hampshire. — Pres., A. H. Lamprey, 
Laconia; Sec, S. C. Kimball, New Market; 
Treas., ' eorge Crosby, Gilford Village. 

New York.— Pres., F. W. CapweU, Dale; 
Sec'y, John Wallace, Syracuse; Treas., M. 
Merrick, Syracuse. 

Ohio.— Pres., (Vm. DiUon, Dayton; Cor 
Sec, J. P. Lyt.o, Sago; Treas., J. M. Scott, 
Alexandria. 

Pennsylvania.- Pres., A. L. Post, Mon- 
trose; Cor. sec, N. Callender, Thompson; 
Treas., W. B. Bertels, WOkesbarre. 

Vermont.— Pres., W.R. Laird; Sec, C. W. 

Potter. ^ , T, ^ 

Wisconsin.— Pres., J. W. Wood, Baraboo; 

Sec, W. W. Ames, Menomonie: Treae., M. R 

Britten, Vienna. 
West Virginia.— Pres., D.B. Tamey; bee, 

John Bosley, Grafluo. Tres.. H B. Higgios, 

Petroleum . 



THE CHRtSTIAN CYNOSTTKE. 



October 1, 1885 



The Christian Cynosure. 

Epitoks. 

J. BLAXCHARD. HENKY L. KELLOGG. 

CHICAGO, THiniSDAT, OCTOKF.R 1, 18S5. 



So long as GoJ, the Bil'u\ aud vlie K^ahhaflt are ig- 
noretl by political platforms, every election is a sea- 
sou of backsliding: as lynching runs down law by 
disj>en5ing with it in administering justice; or as 
laws, never quoted iu courts, are steadily becoming 
obsolete and runniuir down. 



Hon. S. p. Hastixus's article on the analogy be- 
tween the anti-slavery struggle and the anti-liquor or 
prohibition movement, given at Lake Blutl' and in 
the Wisconsin Prohibitionist, is strong and convinc- 
ing. We shall try and give the pith of it in the Ci/- 



ToE New York State Prohibition conven- 
tion met in Syracuse week before last: 600 dele- 
gates were in attendance, and the evening congre- 
gation of four or five thousand, on a wet night. The 
votes were all harmonious. A week or two before 
the New York Grand Lodge of Good Templars re- 
pudiated this Prohibition party by a two-thirds vote! 
In the Prohibition convention, in a few minutes. 
r'our thousand dollars were raised for the cause. 



JouN B. Finch rides two horses running iu oppo- 
site directions. He is the -'Grand Worthy Chief Tem- 
plar of the world" whose sub-Grand Lodges repudiate 
the Prohibition party, of which he is chairman of 
the executive committee. The man who stood with 
his feet in two boats was drowned between them. 



The Mas.sachusettj Prohibitionists met in 
Worcester. Sept. 10th. The convention was earnest 
and harmonious. Es-Gov. St. John gave the ad- 
dress and reported the convention of New York and 
Pennsylvania as --full of hope and promise. ' Thos. 
J. Lathrop. of Taunton and Chas. B. Knight, of 
Worcester were nominated for Governor and Lieut. 
Governor. 



Woman Steerage was warmly endorsed hj both 
State Prohibition conventions of New I'ork and Mas- 
sachusetts. The former said: — "We hold that just- 
ice and equity alike demand that the ballot should 
be triven to woman." 



Masonry is a species of which devil-worship is 
the genus. Devil-worship is ancient as Eden, 
when ?"ve forsook God and followed that "old ser- 
pent which is the devil and Satan." Masonry prop- 
er is English. If Satan had not started a Protest- 
ant. Christless lodge in England (1717) he would 
have had nothing but old popish Templar Masonry, 
■which sunk under the blows of Cervantes in Don 
Quixotte. But the devil always takes both sides; 
and when popish Masonry fell by Cervantes and after- 
ward by the French Revolution, Protestant English 
Masonr}- started at the Apple-tree tavern: came to 
the front; crossed into France; blended with popish 
Chapter Masonry: chartered all lodges, and now 
rules the world. 



Plea.-e read again Rev. R, X. Countee's letter 
in last week's Cynomire. That Memphis movement, 
small as a man's hand at first, may yet cover the 
whole Southern heavens. When the Helots, the 
Spartan slaves, rebelled, their old masters took 
whips for weapons and went out to fight them, and 
the Helots ran away. Our slaves did no such thing. 
They fought under Andrew Jackson and Grant like 
brave men. They now stand by Countee; and if he 
he is killed, as he may be, A-? will not die alone. He 
will be the John Brown of lodgery. Why should 
he not be engaged to lecture all over the South? 



Assyria, Greece, Rome, Carthage, — where are they? 

Tliy waters wasted them while they were free ; 
And many a tyrant since: and their decay 

Uas dried up realms to deserts. — liyrva's Ocean. 

More than seven centuries before Christ (776) a 
strong runner named Choro-bus won a foot race near 
Mt. Olympus in Greece, whose principal peak is near 
10,000 feet high, veiled in clouds and co\'ered with 
snow nine months in the year. The victorv of this 
man's legs'gave date to the'01ympiad.s. The sum- 
mit of Olympus, curtained with clouds from the 
mists of melting snow, became the Senate-Chamber 
of the Olympian Jove and his Sanhedrim of gods. 
Those gods have melted like the mists. So the gob- 
lin mockeries and mirages of the lodge, like the 
misty traditions of Olympus, are shiftino- and van- 



ishing as dreams. Sec the following from the IVc^)- 

ria Freemason : 

SrsPKNUEi^— With regret we le.irn that the h'oii</Ji Aslilnr. 
published at Adelaide, South Australia, has been temporarily if 
not permanently suspended, because the subscribers in arrears 
seem perfectly iuditTereut to their duty to pay . It is the old sto- 
ry repeated. Wliat a graveyard of Jlasonic publications this 
country affords ! Howlnanv papei's the FrceDia.ion, of St. Louis, 
absorbed, and how sadly Bro. Gouley at last yielded to discour- 
agement and disappointment and turned over his list to 
us for completion; The Victorian Frcomi.'ioii gener- 
ously and fraternally champions the liout/h Axfitar, and hopes as 
we do, ••that for the credit of the Craft in South Australia it will 
not be recorded that, just when emerging into the full manhood 
by the erection of a Grand Lodge, it allowed the only ilasonic 
paper published in tJie colony to die for want of support." — 
loi'ct of Jfaisoiiry. 



THE SWEDISH AURORA BOREALIS. 



Scandinavian State-Church Lutherauism, like an 
old and venerable tree, has become worm-eaten by 
the borers of the lodge. More than fifty [years ago 
the more pious part of the people began to gather 
nightly, in groups to read the Bible, and were hence 
called "Readers." But they prayed and preached 
as well. One hundred thousand of these Readers 
have sloughed off the old church, and the Freema- 
sonry of its priests and bishops is a leading cause of 
their secession. Satan is ready with his "dead files" 
to spoil all such good ointment; and the seceded 
Swedes, landing in this country, are being drawn 
into the lodges, more than those who adhered to the 
State Church while they were at home. 

The home leaders of the Free Mission Swedes, 
Waldenstrom, Eckman, Fernholm and others, are 
strong against the lodge, but are accused of laxness 
in doctrine. Waldenstrom, especially, seems to be 
about like our late Dr. Bushnell of Hartford, who 
said of himself, "J do not reject the orthodox creeds. 
I incline, rather, to accept all that come." 

Rev. L. G. Almen, one of the editors of The Stew- 
ard (Skaffaran), of St. Paul, Minn., writes us of Wal- 
denstrom: "His conception of original sin, atone- 
ment and future punishment are essential Socinian- 
ism. . . . But then there is no sjJ'stem in his teach- 
ings. He has been from his very beginning, and 
still is, continuallj' contradicting himself. . . . And 
some of his followers outstrip him in error." 

This is a pit}'. Lax doctrine and lax morals mu- 
tually re-produce each other. But the Swedish 
Lutheran pastoi's, as thej' become acquainted with 
our national anti-secret reform, the Cynosure its or- 
gan, and its secretary J. P. Stoddard, are opening 
their pulpits to him; and these Swedes seem sent of 
God to snatch our country from the jaws of the se- 
cret lodge system.' 

The now sainted Dr. Milton Badger, long secre- 
tary of the American Home Missionary Society, vol- 
unteered to send anti-secret literature to all the home 
missionaries under its emplo}'. We are in hopes 
Secretary Barrows of that noble society will do the 
same; and if so, the vicious non-committalism of 
Mr. Montgomery may be counteracted, and the Free 
Mission Swedes kept from contamination by the 
Freemasonry' which has crept into and controls Con- 
gregational churches and associations. 



POPBRF AND MASONRY. 



"Then does not Masonry recognize Christ?" 
No. The Knight Templars' Christ is a false, 
fighting, counterfeit Christ; that is, Satan simulating 
Christ. They drink from a human skull, a cup of 
devils, and worship devils. 

What relation has the Apple-tree tavern. Blue- 
lodge IMasoury to Templar Masonry? It completed 
it. Templar Blasonry was made up of churchmen; 
the Blue lodge, formed in 1717, was formed bj' ^•them 
that dwell on the earth," the promiscuous crowd which 
make up a modern lodge. English Masonry formed 
at the Apple-tree tavern (1717,) in the leading Prot- 
estant countrj', left out Christ altogether; then went 
across with the Stuarts into France, the leading Ro- 
man Catholic countr}', and there joined itself to 
chapter or priest-Masonr}', a chapter being a dean 
and his clergy; and thus combined the two beasts in 
their image, and so fulfills literally the prophecy of 
Rev. 13: an image of a secret universal empire made 
up of paganism, bj- popish priests. And as the Ap- 
ple-tree tavern Christless lodge then chartered all 
the rest, we have an exact fulfillment of the Revela- 
tion: a one harmonious image of Romish despotism 
and superstition, in a modern lodge made up of 
churchmen and worldlings, a universal false religion 
of which Satan is the god. No picture ever more 
perfectly conformed to its original, than the secret 
lodge system to the symbols in Rev. 13, or rather 
than the "image of the beast" conforms to and de- 
picts the present secret lodge S3'stem. Paganism 
and poper}^, one in nature, one in prophecy, and one 
in their image, the lodge, will be one in the field of 
Armageddon in the battle-day of God which is to 
decide which shall have the worship of this earth, 
Satan or Christ. "And if any man worship the 
beast and his image and receive his mark in his fore- 
head, or in his hand, the same shall drink of the 
wine of the wrath of God which is poured out with- 
out mixture into the cup of his indignation; and he 
shall be tormented with fire and brimstone in the 
presence of the holy angels and in the presence of 
the Lamb." Rev. 14: 9, 10. 



The Holy Catholic church existed some five cen- 
turies before there was any popery or papacy. Rome 
pagan is described by picture and pantomime as the 
seven-headed, ten-horned beast rising out of the sea, 
and on his heads the name of blasphemy. Rev. 13: 1. 
This beast or movement had power "to make war 
with the saints and overcome them," also "power 
over all kindred tongues and nations." 

The second or lamb-dragon beast, is popery. This 
second beast moved '^theni that dwell on the earth," 
men promiscuously taken; not Christians, but men 
(such as now make up a lodge), to make an image of 
the first beast, viz., the secret lodge system, which is 
a copy of the secret Roman empire; a fluctuating, in- 
substantial shadow and likeness of the universal, 
secret, Pioman empire; j'et, shadow though it be, 
having power to kill those who would not worship 
it, and prevent their success in business, Pi,cv. 13: 
15,17. 

But is Masonry the child of popery? 

Yee. The Knight Templar was received to that 
old crusading order "in the name of God, Mary, St. 
Peter and the Pope." (See Mackey's Lex., p. 263.) 
In 1128 the knights received a rule from the pope, 
to which Pope Eugenius "afterwards added a red 
cross as a symbol of martyrdom." (Mack. Lex. p. 
259,) and Mackey quotes and endorses Lawrie', who 
says, "W'e know that the Knight Templars not only- 
possessed the mysteries but perfoiTued the cez'emo- 
nies and inculcated the duties of Freemasons." (p. 
207. j Tliis fully establishes the popish origin of 
the lodge, and fulfills the prophecy of Revelation 
, that papal Rome suggested and pagan Rome made 
it. Popcr}' itself is baptized paganism. 



THE SECRET EMPIRE. 

The frequent calls for information respecting the 
history, membership, obligations, etc., of some of 
the numerous secret orders has led the editors to 
begin, with the new volume, one of the most difficult 
tasks they have ever set for themselves, namely, a 
sketch of all the lodges that comprise the Secret 
Empire, and are continually adding to its numerical 
strength. In these sketches we hope to include all 
the attainable facts which can be of value to our 
readers and lecturers. In this eflfort we shall hope 
to enlist every reader who may learn of any facts 
that can be made valuable in this department. Do 
not delay to communicate at once with your editoi's 
respecting such facts, and give the reform the bene- 
fit of them. 

As Freemasonry, though ante-dated by several 
European societies, is with us the head and center of 
secretism, we have selected the dispassionate, care- 
ful, and clearly written article in Chamber's Encyclo- 
pedia, as likely to be received as of good authority 
and giving a very intelligible account of the transi- 
tion from operative to speculative Masonry. Next 
week this subject will be continued with further his- 
torical statements and a curious extract from an old 
Masonic chronology. 



— Attention is called to the notice of the North, 
Central, and South American Exposition soon to 
open in New Orleans and continue for a period of 
five months. The management have happily named 
the opening day, November 10th, "American Peace 
Dav," and other special days will be celebrated dui-- 
ing the exhibition, as, Press, Bankers, College, Con- 
gressional, Railway, and Electrical Congress, etc., 
but the lodges get no recognition this year as last. 
They contribute nothing to the strength or puritj' or 
nobility of the nation; what recognition do they de- 
serve? 

— The Cynosure was honored by a call fi-om Prof. 
J. A. Edgren, whose efforts for a through and Script- 
ural education of young Swedish Baptist ministers 
have been remarkably blessed of God and enforced 
respect from men, even those who oppose him in the 
name of Masonry. His institution, now being well 
founded at Stromsberg, Nebraska, is succeeding 
most hopefully, having secured an able financial 
agent in Rev. Mr. Orgren. Their work has been one 
of faith, financially, but God has not failed to hon- 
or their trust in his promises. The institution 
stands alone, probably, among Baptist colleges and 
seminaries, in teaching the dangers to church and 
society from the secret orders. 



October 1, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



— A number of good speakers are expected by the 
New Hampshire friends at their meeting in East 
Rochester, October 20th to 22nd. Among them are H. 
L. Hastings and Rev. David McFall of Boston, El- 
der Isaac Hyatt of Gilford Village, and Rev. H. F. 
Wood of Dover. An invitation is sent to Secretary 
Stoddard to be present also. 

— Bro. J. W. Wood of Baraboo and Rev. W. W. 
Ames of Menomonie, president and secretary of the 
Wisconsin State Association, both ajiprove the ap- 
pointment of the State convention made by Bro. 
Bancroft, the State agent. It will be held at Wau- 
kesha, November 17th to 19th, and meantime there 
is opportunity to work up a strong meeting. 

— Bro. Stoddard was much encouraged by the Ge- 
noa meetings which aroused much interest and could 
have been profitably continued through the week had 
his time permitted. The whole region round about 
seems to be open to lectures. Three seceded Ma- 
sons gave their names as having left the lodge. 
They are Henry Holvoy, Alexander Ross, and Alva- 
ro Crocker. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



VACATION RAMBLES. 



— Pres. L. N. Stratton of Wheaton Seminary is 
visiting a number of the State conferences of the 
Wesleyan church during the present month. The 
Seminary opens early in October. 

— Elder- D. P. Rathbun is removing his family to 
Bath, New York. His household goods have already 
been shipped. 

— The wife of Rev. George Richev of Pataskala, 
0., formerly lecturer for the State Association, died 
recently. She was a faithful, devoted and active 
Christian, whose works do follow her on to heaven. 

— Bro. Bancroft, the Wisconsin agent, has been 
too unwell of late to prosecute his work. He hopes 
to recover in time to do some efficient work in pre- 
paration for the State meeting at Waukesha, Nov. 
17th, 18th and 19th. 

— Benjamin Ulsh, our long-time and faithful Indi- 
ana friehd, has temporarily removed to Bowie, Mon- 
tague county, Texas, on account of the ill health of 
his family. He will find a field ready for reform 
work there, as in the North. 

— A note from Dr. Cook, of Indiana, brings the 
sad news of the death of three long and well known 
friends of our reform: Absalom Ballard of Eagle- 
town, John Bowman of Albion, and Benjamin Wal- 
lick of Peru, Indiana. Bro. John Roberts, living 
near Westfield, is also reported very sick. Thus 
pass from earthly toils and warfare one by one those 
whose faithful service will receive the "Well done" 
of their Lord. 

— Bro. T. M. Wood, photographer, of Middletown, 
Lake county, California, sends us a unique cabinet 
picture, being a photograph of the Cynosure print of 
the old Canandaigua jail with a part of the letter 
press accompanying it. Bro. Wood is a strong and 
working temperance man as well as Anti-mason. His 
lectures against the saloon are commended by the 
California press in very flattering terms. 

— Bro. R. A. Cullor of Unionville, Missouri, has 
experienced heavy trials during the past year. His 
son shot a man in self-defense after long and griev- 
ous provocation. The lodgeites, whose wrath at the 
father for his earnest opposition of the orders is un- 
speakable, secured at iirst a sentence of forty j^ears 
in the penitentiary against the young man. But a 
new trial was secured and the jury came near to a 
disagreement, but finally settled on a sentence of ten 
years. Bro. Cullor is satisfied that the lodge manip- 
ulators have secured this heavy sentence. The legal 
expenses have been so great that he has been re- 
duced almost to penury, having to give up his farm 
to meet them. He truly deserves the sympathy and 
prayers of all our reformer brethren, and, if any can 
aflford it, substantial aid as well. 

— Another case of Masonic persecution is that of 
Bro. S. S. Palmer, formerly pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church at Mancelona, Mich., but now of Buf- 
falo. Ever since he seceded from Freemasonry in 
Salamanca, New York, through his seminary course 
at Oberlin, and his succeeding labors as pastor and 
in business the lodge has not ceased to follow him. 
Lately at Arcade, New York, his house was beset, 
and two adopted children spirited away. Occasion 
was made for the trouble by a disagreement with 
his landlord. A final arbitration gave him, howev- 
er, over $300, which is an evidence of the goodness 
of his cause. He has at times felt almost desper- 
ate under the malicious persecutions of the lodge, 
but has been able to praj^ God's mercy upon these 
enemies. 



At four o'clock in the morning six of us in num- 
ber, behind a fine team, started for a day's enjoy- 
ment among the Catskills. A brisk drive of twelve 
or fourteen miles over a hilly and stony road, inter- 
rupted by a breakfast for man and beast by the 
roadside, brought us, about nine o'clock, to the foot 
of the mountains. Up a finely-graded turnpike with 
stones and trees in wild confusion on either hand, 
piled far above us on one side, anfl on the other ex- 
tending far below, with the music of a babbling 
brook or the roar of an occasional waterfall at the 
bottom, so we climbed to the "Rip Van Winkle" 
House and "Rip Van Winkle Hollow." Here we 
crossed and parted company with the stream whose 
melodious voice had thus far beguiled our ascent. 
Upward we climbed, cheered hy an occasional 
glimpse through the trees of the beautiful prospect 
below us, spread out to the Hudson river and far 
beyond, and a constant prospect of the rocks piled 
in wild confusion and the tangled forest reaching 
hundreds and even thousands of feet above us. 

In due time we reached the valley far above in 
which is Beach's Mountain House, which, although 
a plain wooden structure large enough to accommo- 
date 700 guests, was till recently the most aristo- 
cratic summer resort in these mountains. Beauti- 
ful for situation, it occupies a valley which, coming 
up in its rear, contains two beautiful little lakes a 
few rods below the house, and suddenlj' breaks off 
in front of it by a precipice hundreds of feet in 
height and an abrupt descent to the foot of the 
moimtain. On either side are rugged mountain 
summits 500 feet high. 

Some few years ago a gentleman from Philadel- 
phia was stopping at this hotel. He had a sick 
child that wanted cooked chicken in the night. The 
landlord declined to furnish the dish at so unseason- 
able an hour, and told the father, who complained 
of this, that he had better build a boarding-house of 
his own. He said that was just what he was think- 
ing of doing, and the next morning he went and 
selected a site on the summit of the mountain south, 
just south of and near to the lower lake. He pur- 
chased several thousand acres of the wild mountain 
scenery around, which he calls the Kaaterskill Park 
and which he has threaded to the most interesting 
natural scenery with rugged footpaths or beautiful, 
costly mountain roads. Up into the heart of this 
wild mountain retreat a narrow-gauge railroad has 
crept, and a picturesque little depot is nestled be- 
side the lower lake, which has been largelj' increased 
in size by a heavy stone dam and bridge built across 
its outlet. 

From hence the strong and easy carriages made 
expressly for its use, from the Kaaterskill House, 
by a short and exceedingly beautiful drive, land 
passengers with heavy purses upon the very summit 
of the mountain at the door of as fine a hotel as can 
be found in the world, with all modern improve- 
ments, pure water, gas, separate bath-rooms and 
closets in a hundred rooms, a room for lectures and 
concerts 200 feet long — everything, in short, that a 
summer community of nabobs 1,200 in number can 
even imagine that their wants require. Instead of 
the whilom weary and toilsome journey from Cats- 
kill seven or eight miles to the mountain, and then 
a rugged climb ^to its summit, which all passengers 
and supplies and the very material to build this ex- 
tensive house and its stables for over 100 horses and 
its carriage houses, had to make, a short and easy 
trip now suflSces for all. 

No Cyclops picked ofi' the top of this mountain 
summit of solid rock, but giant powder and Paddy's 
pick have made here a gently sloping and now fine- 
ly-shaven lawn of several acres, beautifully adorned 
with beds of flowers, around this magnificent sport- 
ing-place of the would-be aristocracy of the world, 
at an expense, including the cost of the buildings, 
of over $-1,000,000. Here, 3,000 feet above the level 
of the water in the Hudson, which lies in plain sight 
for over sixty miles, on the hot day of our visit the 
parlor grates contained heaps of burning coals that 
were evidently required for comfort in the morning 
and evening. 

The view of the country below is indeed grand 
and wonderful. The fields of grass, and yellow 
grain and waving corn look like squares on a vast 
checker-board, interspersed irregularly among which 
are patches and strips of green, which seen from the 
waters of the Hudson below are forest-covered hill- 
tops, in some cases several hundred feet high. Over 
the tops of these is seen like a continuous ribbon of 
silver the waters of the river, far beyond which, and 
skirting this immense apparent plain appear the 
Adirondack, Green and Hoosac mountains and the 
Berkshire hills, in almost as many different States. 
Taking a last glance at this lovely panorama after 



a day of unalloyed pleasure, spent amid Nature's 
wildest, most romantic scenery, we turned our faces 
homeward, and at ten o'clock v. si. sought our rest- 
ing-places, to dream, perchance, of Hendrick Hud- 
son and his weird revelers amid the awful solitudes 
of the Catskills. 0. F. LusiRV. 



LITER A TURE. 



By- WATS AND Bird Notes. By Maurice Thompson, author 
of "Songs of Fair Weather," etc. Price, 75c. John B. Alden, 
publisher. New York. 

This beautiful little volume, published by that en- 
terprising friend of all lovers of good literature, John 
B, Alden, is one of those pleasing and exquisitely 
wrought children of fact and fancy which ought to 
be in the hands of every lover of nature. The peru- 
sal of its pages wraps one in that dreamy and pleas- 
ing Indian summer feeling which used to possess us 
whenever we read those charming prose poems of 
Thoreau, which were so vividly and fancifully real 
as to lull us into a momentary belief that we were 
dancing with the young bears on the frost-shaven 
tops of the cedars on Mt. Katahdin or really captur- 
ing nine-pound trout for ourselves, though we had 
never seen a real live one and had never angled for 
anything more gamey than small and not very hun- 
gry*mud pout. 

While our author is so charmingly imaginative 
he never fails to weave in with his imagery the clever 
and accurate descriptions of the life, habits and ap- 
pearence of our feathered friends. Indeed his bits 
of information concerning them are choice, new and 
accurate. Certainly our young friends could not 
find a more pleasing introduction to the charming 
study of "Bird-Life" than in reading aloud to their 
elder friends "A Red-Headed Family," "Cuckoo 
Notes," "In a Palace of Reeds," "Browsing and Nib- 
bling," and that beautiful description of "a belted 
kingfisher," in "The Threshold of the Gods." Every 
paper is teeming with the odor and incense of the 
woods and vocal with the songs of their feathered 
denizens. The volume has charms alike for the old 
and the j'oung. To the one class it will recall the 
scenes and dreams of the times when the earth to 
them was new and full of melody and hilarious joy. 
To the other class it will be a strong inspiration to 
become acquainted with the objects about them, and 
lead them out and up towards the source of all true 
happiness, "Our adorable God." R. t. m. 

We are in receipt of the twelfth and last number 
of ''German Simplified," edited and published by A. 
Knoflach, New York. Intended, as it is, for self-in- 
struction, the work has its merits, and will doubtless 
very much assist the student. It would, however, 
be the height of folly for any one to attempt by 
self-instruction to master the German language. To 
do that requires the aid, at least for a season, of a 
teacher speaking the language. If it be impossible 
to obtain such aid, "German Simplified," will proba- 
bly better than most text books assist in acquiring 
a very rudimentary knowledge of the language. 

W. Scott, Publisher, Loudon, has just brought out 
a selection of the poems of the marvellous boypoet, 
Chatterton.who perished three months before reaching 
his eighteenth year. To this edition is prefixed a very 
interesting biography of Chatterton. The latter seems 
to have been treated by Walpole with the lyrannous 
arrogance which rude-minded men in high places 
usually show to struggling genius. Walpole is even 
said to have been indirectly the cause of the poor 
boy's early death. It was of this unfortunate that 
Coleridge' said: "Had he lived he would have been 
as far above Shakespeare as Shakespeare is above 
me." 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— NOTICE. 

The Ninth Annual Meeting of the New Hampshire 
Christian Association will be held in the Advent church 
at East Rochester, Oct. 20, 21. and 22, commencing Tues- 
day evening and closing Thursday evening. Earnest, 
honest Christian men will be engaged to speak. Let this 
meeting be a grand rally for the Lord and his truth. Let 
constant prayer be offered that the Holy Spirit may guide 
our deliberations and inspire every speaker. 

A. a. Lajipret, President, 

S. C. Kimball, Secretary. 



Jefliersou Davis, the ex confederate leader, comes 
out of his old-age retirement at Beauvoir. Miss., to 
deny in the New York Herald, a story told bv a 
Lieut. Isrigg, concerning his attempting to escape in 
female attire when surrounded by U. S. cavalry in 
1865 This is not the first time Davis has endeav- 
ored to contradict this story. Will our old singer 
friend, George W. Clark, tell us what he knows of 
the matter? 




10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSTJKE. 



October 1, 1885 



The Home. 



Ob, biixU that slug such thankful psalms, 

Kebukiug human flatting. 
Teach us your s«?cret of content. 

Your science of forgetthig. 
For every life must have it* ills— 

Tou, t«i, have times of sorrow — 
Teach us, like you, to lay them by 

And sins: again to-morrow ; 
For gems of blackest jet may rest 

Within a goMen setting. 
And he is wis* who understiinds 

The science of forgetting. 

Oh. palms that bow before the grale 

Until its peactful ending, 
Teach us your ueUling, linked with strength, 

Tour graceful art of bending ; 
For every tree must meet the storm, 

Each heart encounter sorrow ; 
Teach us, like you, to bow, that we 

May stand erect to-morrow ; 
For there is strength in humble grace — 

Its wis<> disciples shielding — 
And he is strong who understands 

The happy art of yielding. 

Oh. brook, which laughs all night, all day, • 

With voice of sweet seduction, 
Teach us your art of laughing more 

At every new obstruction ; 
For every life has eddies deep 

And rapids fiercely dashing, 
Sometimes through gloomy caverns forced, 

Sometimes in sunlight flashing; 
Tet there is wisdom in your way. 

Tour laughing waves and whimples : 
Teach tis your gospel built of smiles. 

The secret of your dimples. 

Ob, oaks, that stand in forest ranks. 

Tall, strong, erect, and sightly, 
Yotu- branches arched in noblest grace. 

Tour leaflets laughing lightly : 
Teach us your firm and quiet strength, 

Your secret of extraction 
From slimy darkness in the soil 

The grace of life and action ; 
For they are rich who understand 

The secret of combining 
The good deep hidden in the earth 

With that where suns are shining. 

Oh, myriad forms of earth and air. 

Of lake, and sea, and river, 
Which make our landscapes glad and fair 

To glorify the Giver , 
Teach us to learn the lessons hid 

In each familiar feature. 
The mystery which so perfects 

Each low or lofty creature; 
For God is good, and life is sweet, 

While suns are brightly shining, 
To glad the glooms and thus rebuke 

Our follies of repining. 

Each night is followed by its day, 

Each storm by fairer weather, 
While all the works of nature sing 

Their psalms of joy together. 
Then learn, O heart, their songs of hope ! 

Cease, souli thy thankless sorrow ; 
For though the clouds be dark to-day, 

The sun shall shine to-morrow; 
Learn well, from bird and tree and rill, 

The sins of dark resentment; 
And know the greatest gift of God 

Is faith and sweet contentment. 

— C'</urler-./(/urjial. 



THE HEGONI) COMING OF CHRIST. 



The above subject is .statx;d ."^18 times in the 260 
chajjters of the New Testament, or once every 
twenty-five verses. This shows how important the 
New testament writers thought the return of Christ 
to be, and its introduction into almost every discourse 
and on a great variety of themes shows how the 
early teachers of Christianity enjoyed it, without 
'■wearing out the saints of the Most High," or con- 
sidering it a threadbare subject. There is scarcely 
an allusion to this coming which is not eminently 
practical. '-If we believe that Jesus died and rose 
again," then we are ready to receive the other very 
important addition, that they "that sleep in Jesus 
will God bring with him." 

In Paul's earliest written epistle we should natur- 
allj- exjjcct him to lay a firm foundation in doctrine 
and practice for the faith or the church. He says 
of conversion (1 Thess. 1: 9, 10;, "Ye turned to God 
from idols to ser\-e the living and true God and to 
wait for hU Hon frora heaven." Our Saviour says, 
"What shall it profit a man?" then follows a pro- 
found question in regard to the soul's value. "For 



the Son of Man shall oome." We often hear of 
sleepy professors (Christians?). Why should they 
not awake? Ts it not high time to awake out of 
sleep? Certainly: but wiltthey? AVhile the Bride- 
groom tarried thoy all slumbered. What is the cause 
of this mental and moral stupor? When the Son of 
Man shall come in his glory, every disciple will be 
truly awake, for heisjour life, and it is hid "in him." 
"Watch ye, therefore, for ye know neither the day 
nor the hour when the Sou of Man cometh." How 
will he oome? "As ye (the disciples) have seen him 
go into heaven" — in the body, in the presence of his 
disciples, iu clouds (it may be of witnesses), from the 
Mount of Olives. Where will he come? "His feet 
shall stand in that day upon the Mount of Olives 
which is before Jerusalem on the east" (Zach. 14: 4). 
Pear brethren, are you "looking for that blessed 
hope and the glorious appearing?" "See that ye 
come behind iu no gift, waiting for the coming of 
our Lord Jesus Christ." Shall we pra}' for it? Yes; 
John did. "Come, Lord Jesus." The crown of right- 
eousness is to be given "in that day." Then he will 
be glorified "in his saints." "Our conversation is in 
heaven, from whence also we look for the Saviour." 
"Sanctify you wholly," Paul prays unto the coming 
of our Lord Jesus Christ. Are you laboring under 
a great "trial" of faith? Ye maj' be found unto 
praise and power and glorj'. "Be patient, there- 
fore, unto the coming of the Lord. "Beloved, now 
are 3"e the sons of God," but when he shall appear 
we shall be like him. Seeing jq look for such things, 
he patient. The faithful pastor to his flock may say, 
"What is our hope or joy or crown of rejoicing? Are 
not even)'e in the presence of our Lord Jesus Christ 
at his coming?" Then present faith will be sight; 
Simeon took him up in his arms; Mary sat at his 
feet; Martha served him; Lazarus was his table 
companion; The apostles all walked with him, and 
John leaned on his breast. But, blessed Jesus, 
"what will it be to be there?" — Rev. M. W. iSpencer, 
ill the Mornina Star. 



WHAT IS RELIGION r 

A negro congregation has reeentlj' ejected from its 
pulpit the pastor because, in his preaching, he failed 
to produce in the souls of his hearers "a happj^-fying 
etiect." The colored church had a quaint way of 
stating their trouble, but that they fairly hit it there 
can be no doubt. This "happy-fying ellect" is, after 
all, only a very apt and correct way of expressing 
the idea which gropes in the minds of not a few 
white congregations in reference to the character and 
ability of their ministers. To such the preacher is 
successful if, by his sermons and his personal ad- 
dress, he makes those who hear and meet him to 
feel happy. Religion, according to this estimate, is 
a state of spiritual enjoyment — an easy, pleasurable, 
self-satisfied feeling. A sermon is good that lifts 
the hearer into a glow of wonder, or quietly lets him 
down into a blissful restfulness. So the Keverend 
Cream Cheese is "a love of a preacher" because, in 
his prayers and discourses, he excites or lulls the 
nerves of his congregation, and, by his dainty ways 
at the "church sociables," wins the hearts of the 
"young people." Religion, being in its inmost na- 
ture "happy-fying," means in the pulpit an immacu- 
lately-fitting coat, middle-parted hair, considerable 
jjoetry, a musical flow of beautiful words; and in the 
church orange suppers, neck tie parties, chocolate 
ice-cream soirees and sacred footlight performances, 
with side-shows where gambling is called "guess- 
ing." A modern church is fully equipped only as it 
has a silk-stockinged romancer in the pulpit, a full- 
fledged angel of a soprano in the choir, and a kitchen 
stove in the basement — all of which most appropri- 
ately go with this idea that religion is "happy-fy- 
ing." But somehow any reading of Scripture jars 
like a thunder-roll amidst these "divine services." 
Law and prophecy, psalm and Gospel, thrust hard 
against these "good-time" ideas of religion. Prohi- 
bition and injunction, "burdens," "woes" innumer- 
able, obligation, duty, "the cross," "self-denial," 
"service unwearied," "loss of right hands," "loss of 
right eyes," "resisting unto blood," "faithful unto 
death" — these strong, cutting words meet one every- 
where in New and Old Testament until religion be- 
gins to be less and less a "happy-fying" thing, and 
more and more a serious, urgent, never-ending work. 
If religion is to be pleased, and to be interested, and 
to have a good time, and to be happy, then let the 
high-j^riced choir sing on their operatic snatches. 
Let the low-pumped preacher syllable forth his 
"airy nothings." Let the kitchen stove glow, and 
the footlights flash, and pink tea-parties "ne'er break 
up." But if religion means the "working out with 
fear and trembling of the soul's salvation," and the 
living and the dying with Christ for the world's re- 
demption, then it is time for a singing that shall be 



for God's praise, and a preaching that shall con- 
demn and convict and save, and a church which shall 
be fulfilling the mission of its Founder in preaching 
the Gospel to every creature. — Vermont Chronicle. 



THE PURE IN HEART. 



Some are greatly perplexed to understand how 
tiie blood of Christ can cleanse the heart from sin — 
how we can wash our robes ad make them white in 
the blood of the Lamb. The word hlood, in this 
connection, refers to the atonement that Christ made 
for sin, and this is the procuring cause of our salva- 
tion; and this great price of the blood of the ever- 
lasting covenant secured for us "the gift of the Iloli/ 
Ghost." So we are made pure by the incoming of 
the Hoh' Ghost, through the merits and death of the 
Lord Jesus Christ. The fulness of the Holy Ghost 
is entire satisfaction. 

Let us always remember that when the Holy Ghost 
comes into the soul, he comes to rule that soul. He 
will not take full possession until there is an absolute 
surrender to his sway. Some say, "I submitted when 
I was converted." Yes, you did; but it was the sub- 
mission of a rebel laying down his weapons of re- 
bellion. Now you must submit yourself as a loyal 
man, who is willing to lay down his life for his coun- 
tr}'. At conversion you gave all your bad things to 
God; after you are converted you give all your good 
things. Yea, you give him all — "a living sacrifice, 
holj', acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable 
service." 

Some years ago a rich man was on his knees at a 
national camp-meeting, seeking for heart purity, but 
there was a conflict going on in his mind. In the 
midst of his praying he took out his pocket-book 
and pencil and began to make an estimate of how 
much he could give to God without embarrassing 
his business. He concluded that he could give $5,- 
000 and decided to do so, and soon the joy of heaven 
welled up in his heart, That $5,000 started our Mex- 
ican mission. He went home and related this expe- 
rience to his wife, and she was under conviction for 
holiness, but the blessing lingered, and she hardly 
knew why. At last her husband said, "I have been 
making a calculation and find that the jewels you 
wear, if sold, would sustain a missionary in China 
for eighteen years, and now will y'ou give them up 
for Christ's sake?" 

When Miss Frances Ridley Havergal was seeking 
purity of heart she had about fifty jewels that had 
been given to her. She felt that Jesus must have 
them, so she sent them, all except a plain pin and 
watch-chain which she kept for use, to the missiona- 
ry society. 

So must we all yield our whole being and substance 
to God, saying — 

"Take my soul and body's powers. 

Take my memory , mind and will, 
All my goods and all ray hours. 

All I know and all I feel , 
All I think, or speak or do, 

Take my heart and make it new.'j 

— Guide to Holiness. 



HOW IT IS BONE. 



I remember a man who had been a Christian for 
two years, but who was bemoaning his hard and sin- 
ful heart. I said to him one day: "Did you ever 
know a sinner who had not a hard heart?" 

"No," he said, "but mine is getting no better." 

I arose and closed all the shutter, and made the 
room quite dark. 

"Why do you do that?" he asked. 

"I want to teach you how to drive away the dark- 
ness," I said; so I handed him a long broom and a 
duster. "Now I want you to sweep out the dark- 
ness." 

"I can't," he said. 

"Can't you if you try very hard? Will no amount 
of physical force do it?" 

"Certainly not," he said. 

Then I opened the shutters, and the room was 
beatifully illuminated. "So you see that, if you 
want the darkness and dreadiugs of your heart to be 
dispelled, it is not by any amount of effort of your 
own, but by letting in the light of the Sun of Right- 
eousness. But now that we have such a beautiful 
light in the room, we may close the shutters again; 
we shall want no more, I suppose, for a month," I 
said. 

"What do you mean?" 

"I mean that we are not to expect to have a slock 
of grace laid up, on which we may draw; but that, 
if we would continue in the light, we must keej) look- 
ing up to the Sun, and receiving his blessed rays in- 
to our souls." — Selected. 



October 1, 1885 



THE CFHISTIAiq" CYNOSUKE. 



11 



MOTHER'S ROOM. 

I'm awfully soit}' for poor Jack Roe; 
He's the boy that lives with his aunt, you know, 
And he says his house is filled with gloom 
Because it has got no "mother's room." 
I tell you what, it is fine enough 
To talk of "boudoirs" and such fancy stufE, 
But the room of rooms that seems best to me, 
The room where I'd always rather be, 
' Is mother's room, where a fellow can rest. 
And talk of things his heart loves best. 

What if I do get dirt about. 
And sometimes startle my aunt with a shout ; 
It is mother's room, and if she don't mind 
To the hints of others I'm always blind. 
Maybe I lose my things— what then? 
In my mother's room I find them again. 
And I've never denied that I litter the floor 
With marbles and tops and many things more, 
But I tell you, for boys with a tired head, 
It's jolly to rest it on mother's bed. 

Now, poor Jack Roe, when he visits me, 
I take him to mother's room, you see. 
Because it's the nicest place to go 
When a fellow's spirits are getting low. 
And mother she's always kind and sweet, 
And there's always a smile poor Jack to greet. 
And somehow the sunbeams seem to glow 
More brightly in mother's room, I know. 
Than anywhere else ; and you'll never find gloom 
Or any old shadow in mother's room. 

— JTarper's Young People. 



BABIES IN 8GANDINA VIA. 



The peasants like grand names for their little 
ones, such as Adolph, Adricin, Gotfried, Gustavus, 
for boys; and Josephina, Thora, Ingeborg, for girls; 
and if they have no name prepared, they seek one 
in the almanac for the particular day of baby's 
birth. It is baptized the next Sunday and taken to 
church by the god-mother, who provides the chris- 
tening garments, which are often trimmed with col- 
ored bows, while the infant has beads round its 
neck and wears a cap with very little border. The 
clergyman holds it well over the font and pours 
water ovQr the back of the head three times, then 
wipes with a towel. As the baby is swathed in six- 
inch-wide bandages so that it cannot move its legs 
and sometimes not even its arms, it is obliged to lie 
very passive during this ceremonial. The peasants 
have their reasons for this swathing, the first of 
which is that they think it makes the limbs grow 
straight; the second, that it turns baby into a com- 
pact bundle to carry. When swathed thus, infants 
have been said to resemble the tail of a lobster, or 
even its whole body. In the north they are often 
hung from a long, springy pole stuck in the wall, to 
be out of the way; and, being by nature quiet, they 
are supposed not to mind it. Their cradles, which 
are very primitive, are also frequently suspended by 
a spiral spring from the roof, which must be more 
comfortable than the pole. Both in Swedish and 
Norwegian Lapland people take these "swaddlings" 
to church. But instead of carrying them into church 
they make a hole in the snow outside in the church- 
yard and bury them in it, leaving a small aperture 
for breathing purposes. The babies are kept splen- 
didly warm, while their friends within the sacred 
building have their beards frozen to their fur coats 
by the freezing of their own breaths. As soon as a 
peasant boy can walk, he is put into trousers, but- 
toned outside his jacket; and these are so baggy be- 
hind that it is often amusing to see him. This bag 
giness is frequently due to the fact that the trousers 
originally belonged to his father, and were cut of! at 
the legs and simply drawn round the boy's waist 
without reducing their size. Add to this that the 
feet are shod either with little jack-boots or wooden 
shoes, and we have a strange picture. Their stock- 
ings either have leather heels or no heels at all, so 
that the mother is spared the trouble of mending 
them. Neither has she much labor with their heads, 
the hair of which is cropped as close as a convict's. 
The girls also wear wooden shoes, but they have 
gingham kerchiefs or caps on their heads, frocks 
down to their heels, and quaint pinafores. — The Lit- 
tle Folks' Magaziae. 



ey, and very early in the morning he was awaked by 
this noisy, vexatious sing-song of his neighbor, the 
weaver. 

He reflected how he could put an end to this an- 
noyance. He could not forbid it; for singing, like 
praying and working, is the right of ever}' man in 
his own house, with which no one can interfere. He 
must use other means, then. 

He sent for the workman, and asked him at what 
value he estimated his singing. The workman re- 
plied that he thought it was certainly worth a day's 
wages, as it made the day's work so easy to him. 

The merchant inquired how much that was. The 
man replied, and it was certamly not a large sum 
which he named. 

Then the merchant said he would pay him a month's 
wages in advance, not for the singing, indeed, but 
that he should henceforth sing no more, but keep a 
strict silence. And he laid down the money before 
him. 

The weaver thought to himself it could not be 
easier earned; so he took the money and promised 
that he would be as still as a mouse in his work- 
shop. 

When he got home with his money he counted it 
out full of joy; and they were all good new coins — 
more money than he had ever possessed at once in 
his life before. In the evening, before he went to 
sleep, he gazed at his treasure for nearly an hour; 
and at night he put it under his pillow, lest a thief 
should steal any of it. At midnight he still had it 
in his head, and thought about what he should do 
with it. And in the morning when he arose it seemed 
to weigh down all his limbs like lead — his head was 
heavy with lying awake so anxiously, his hands were 
heavy and lazy, and refused their usual service. 

Ah, he dared not smg! 

Time passed away slowly and tediously, so that 
he could scarcely endure the day. Meanwhile he had 
been thinking the matter over and had come to a 
conclusion, for the man who, stood at eight that even- 
ing in the merchant's office was the weaver. 

"Sir, with j^our permission," he said, "here you 
have your money back again; it is an evil spirit 
which does not allow me to sleep quietly." 

And before the merchant could sa}' a word in re- 
ply, the weaver was already outside the door, and 
singing, with a clear, full voice, 

A fresh and merry heart 

Is worth more than money or wealth , 

— Chatterbox. 



TEMPERAUCE. 



A BUGLE NOTE FOR PROHIBITION. 



BETTER THAN MONET. 



There was once a poor man, a linen-weaver, who 
sat every day, from earliest dawn, in his workshop, 
hard at work; and as he was one who put his trust 
in God, to pass away the time he would sing many a 
hymn or innocent song, as he felt inclined. And 
he had so clear and strong a voice that the neighbors 
required no alarm to wake them in the morning. 

But this greatly annoyed a rich merchant who 
lived near him; for he never could sleep before mid- 
night, owing to his anxious thoughts about his mon- 



REPORT OF THE SUSQUEHANNA FREE METHODIST 
CONFERENCE ON TEMPERANCE. 

There are many forms of intemperance. Each form 
is a root which, under favorable conditions, produc- 
es the full grown tree, with all its poisonous roots, 
branches and deadly fruits. Intemperance is a 
deadly crime. It is a deadly foe to the home, the 
church and the state. It is founded in avarice on 
the part of the rumseller, and in selfish ambition on 
the part of the bad politician, and an unholy appe- 
tite on the part of the drunkard. The chief obsta- 
cles to the temperance reform, are the ignorance and 
indifference of the churches and the bad politicians 
who control political parties in the interest of the 
rum power; and who prevent the people from vot- 
ing directly on the question of prohibition. 

The four great corner-stones in this wholesale 
crime, are: 

1st. Pat behind the bar. 

2d. The officials who grant licenses and should ex- 
ecute the laws. 

3d. The legislators who make the laws. 
4th. Tne voters who make the legislators. 
In our judgment the attempt to suppress the crime 
of intemperance merelj^ bj' moral suasion or good 
advice, while at the same time the State prohibits by 
law the crimes it occasions, and legalizes the crime 
of intemperance and tempts to drunkenness by the 
bloody license system, is the most consummate folly. 
License either high priced or low priced, perpetuates 
and increases the liquor traffic. Eor the suppression 
of intemperance, regulation and taxation is worse than 
useless. We need not only moral suasion in the 
home, the school, from the pulpit and the press, but 
we need most of all State and National constitution- 
al prohibition. 

And this can only be had when a party becomes 
dominant, whose political platform clearly advocates 
prohibition, and whose nominees for office are genu- 
prohibitionists. Only such a party will execute pro- 
hibitory laws. 

Neither of the two great political parties favor 
emperance, much less national prohibition. The 



Republican party claims to be the party of great 
moral ideas — a temperance rum par}-. The Demo- 
cratic party claims to be a rum part}-. The settled 
policy of both these parties has been, is, and must 
be license or legalized poisoning. Both of these 
parties are so owned and controlled b}' the rum pow- 
er that they cannot reform themselves because ref- 
ormation would be self-destruction. To vote with 
either of these national parties is to A'Ote for license. 
To claim otherwise is absurd, because license and 
prohibition are exact opposites, and it is al)solutely 
impossible to vote a ])rohibition license ticket. Not 
to vote for prohibition is to vote for license. 

Those who vote with license parties vote for the 
drunkenness, the puperism, the ghastl}' crimes and 
the endless damnation justly chargeable to the li- 
cense system. They are partners with rumsellers 
and drunkards, and therefore partakers of their sins. 

If the church, the world's lighthouse, is darkness 
on this subject, if she talks temperance and votes 
license, if she votes with wicked parties for ungodly 
men, while she waits for prohibition to become pop- 
ular, millions of souls will be shipwrecked and lost 
forever through her neglect, and their blood will 
God require at her hands. 

As a denomination we are radical and progressive 
on the temperance question. Our book of discipline 
prohibits the use of fermented wines at the sacra- 
ment, alcoholic beverages, toliacco and opium, for 
the gratification of depraved appetites; it also pro- 
hibits the production, manufacture and sale of to- 
bacco, and instructs members to vote only for pro- 
hibitionists. 

In our judgment we would be more consistent and 
more efficient in promoting temperance — 

1. If our discipline was more strictly enforced in 
reference to picking hops, selling tobacco, etc. 

'i. If the common use of tobacco was prohibited 
and regarded only as a mode of producing disease, 
and in no case a medicine. 

3. If our members were prohil)ited from renting 
their property for the promotion of any form of in- 
temperance. 

4. If our membership more fully understood that 
they cannot promote the welfare of the state, the 
church, or the glory of God, while they A'ote for any 
political party whose platform is silent on the suij- 
ject of prohibition. 

Resolved, That we, as a conference, will do all in 
our power to educate the people in favor of Gospel 
temperance and prohibition. 

Resolved, That we will vote with no political part}' 
that ignores, or attempts to be neutral on the sub- 
ject of prohibition. 

Resolved, That we will support no political party 
whose nominees for office are not genuine prohibi- 
tionists, and whose party platform does not distinct- 
ly and fully advocate State f>nd National prohibi- 
tion. 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this conference at 
the present that we ought earnestly to support either 
the American party or the national Prohibition partj'. 



A TEMPERANCE CENTENNIAL. 

BoTsoN, Mass., Sept. 21 — A temperance centenni- 
al conference of two days' duration was begun to- 
da}' at Tremont Temple. The occasion was in com- 
memoration of what is popularly known as the tem- 
perance reform in this country, as it was in 1775 
that Dr. Rush published his essay on "The eflects of 
Ardent Spirits on the Human Mind and Body." 
The conference is under the auspices of the Massa- 
chusetts Total Abstinence Society, and during the 
day addresses were made by the Rev. Daniel Dor- 
chester, D. D., the Rev. J. W. Chickeriug, D. D., 
Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, and the Rev. A. A. Miner. At 
the evening session the speakers were the Rev. A. 
Lamson, and Mrs. Marv A. Livermore. 



WHAT BEER IS DOING. 

At the brewers' congress, twenty-five .years ago, 
but thirty-four firms were represented. At the last 
one, the records show an organization of 739 mem- 
bers, ma.de up from thirty-six States, and represent- 
ing 3,000 breweries, which produce 16,000,000 of the 
18,000,000 barrels of beer annually brewed in the 
United States. There are $250,000,000 iuA-ested in 
this business, and it requires to labor of 500,000 men. 
This number, with the 30,000 makers and sellers of 
distilled spirits, make up a pretty fair political part}', 
and sound thinking men and practical Christian men 
have come to the conclusion that there should be an 
anti-brewers party, which is once and forever opposed 
to the manufacture and sale of that poison which is 
rapidly making our American homes wretched. Yet, 
on account of such a position, these God-fearing men 
and women are called fanatical. What a blessed 
thought it is that there is Another who is to pro- 
nounce the final verdict on the question. 



ladCdaUHMaH 



rririfr i"" 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSTTKE. 



October 1, 1886 



TBI CHTTRCHES. 



— Kev. A. AV. Hall, seorotarv of the Iowa State 
Association, is visiting the Wesleyan ooufereneos as 
missionary agent of the denomination. He is en- 
deavoring to make etHeient the plan of raising an 
average of $1.00 per member. 

— The evangelistic meetings which were begun 
July 1, at Chicago Avenue Church, have been held 
ever^- evening since, and are still in progress, with 
increasing interest. The conduct of the meetings 
has been in the hands of well-known evangelists but 
last week the preaching was by Pres. C. A. Blanch- 
anl, Kev. Prs. Henson of the First Baptist, Little of 
the New England Congregational and Lawrence of 
the Second Baptist churches. 

— Gospel services began on September 20th at 
L}-nn. M:iss. The tirst six days the services were to 
1h? under the direction of Eev. George C. Needham, 
former pastor of the Chicago Avenue (.Moody) 
church. Chicago. Mr. Moody followed on the iCth. 

— George Y. Pentecost will begin a series of Sun- 
day afternoon services at the Academy of Music, 
Brooklyn, on October 4th. He will be assisted by a 
large male choir, under the leadership of Mr. George 
C. Stebbens. 

— Mrs. Maria Woodworth closed a two-weeks" meet- 
ing in Deltz's Grove, near Munice. Ind., on the 20th 
inst, when 25.000 people were present. Great ex- 
citement prevailed. At least two-fifths of the people 
present were shouting joyously and confessing con- 
version. Fifty persons were thrown into a seance, 
some of whom remained a long time in that condi- 
tion. Mrs. Woodworth's receipts and profit on 
stands and donations aggregate nearly 8600. 

— The American Methodist missionary. Johnson, 
has arrived in London on his return from St, Paul 
De Loando. He states that the American Methodist 
Mission. William Taylor's, there are all well and 
happy, and says that the reports recently circulated 
that the mission had sufl'ered by deaths from star- 
vation and disease are false, and are based solely on 
the fact that Charles Miller, of Baltimore, had died 
from illness. Mr. Miller, Mr. Johnson says, might 
have recovered but for his persistence in refusing to 
take proper medicine, which he did for the reason he 
gave that he -trusted in the Lord to help him 
through."" Mr. Johnson declares that the mission 
has pfenty of wholesome food, and has lost no mem- 
l>er but Mr. Miller. 

— Rev. George F. Pentecost once offered himself 
to preach the Gospel to the heathen, but was declined 
on account of his want of knowledge of Greek and 
Latin! In view of what he has since done in this 
country, we may surely say God has made ttie fool- 
ishness of that examining committee to praise him. 

— The Chicago Bethesda Mission, located at Nos. 
.368 and 370 South Clark street, is situated in one of 
the most densely populated and sin-cursed por- 
tions of the city, well-named "the black-hole of Chi- 
cago.'" There is to be found within its immediate 
vicinity a population of from 10,000 to 15,000 poor 
creatures, huddled together in close quarters, in the 
midst of saloons, dance-houses, variety theaters, da- 
go shops, gambling dens, and places of similar re- 
sort The streets are crowded with little children. 
In the midst of all this darkness the Bethesda Mis- 
sion stands almost alone, an embodiment of "Christ's 
love for the world." Here the sick poor can get 
medical advice and medicine -^vithout mone}'. The 
children are gathered into the free kindergarten, the 
kitchen, industrial school, and Sabbath school. Most 
of them have to be washed and clothed as v/ell as 
taught. Gospel temperance meetings are held night 
ly at the mission, under the leadership of Ben. Ho- 
gan. the reformed pugilist. The room is filled with 
pr'jdigals ruined by rum who are trying to reform. 
On the upper floor of the building is a day nursery, 
where the babe from 2 weeks old to 7 years old "is 
cared for while the mother is at work. The nursery- 
cares for about 300 children monthly. The expense 
of carrying on the mLssion is about .8300 a month. 

—At the meeting of the United Presbyterian Svn- 
wl, at Saratoga, N. Y., Sept. 17th, Rev. Dr. J. "b. 
Dales, Correstxmding Secretary, submitted the re- 
port of the Board of Foreign Mission.s. It was 
shown that the foreign mission work of the United 
Presbyterian church is in two fields— India and 
Eg}"pt. The report included the following state- 
ment: We have 115 distinct mission stations^lS for- 
eign missionaries and 1 physician, with their wives. 
15 unmarried female foreign missionaries 235 na- 
tive laborers and helpers, 10 native licentiare.s, and 
8 ordained native ministers, making in all a mission- 
ary force of 308 persons. 

—The additions to our five hundred and fortv- 
three churches [Refoimed] last year on confession 



of faith were 4,5;>;\ an average of about eight to each 
church. The result is encouraging but not satisfac- 
tory. If the conversion of souls occupied our 
thoughts and desires as it deserves, the number 
■would be much larger. — Chris. TnteUt'goicer. 

— Of the German Missionary Societies the Mora- 
vian Society leads the list. The Basel Society has 
the largest "income, about S210,000. The total re- 
ceipts of all the various German societies amounted 
to .8700.000. of which sum German}' contributed 
$550,000, the remainder coming from abroad, the 
mission fields contributing 810,000, the United States 
822,000, etc. 

— The Protestants of France are intending to com- 
memorate, on the ISth of October, the second cen- 
tenary of the revocation of the Edict of N antes. It 
is proposed to signalize this occasion by making it 
the starting point of a new etfbrt to extend the bless- 
ings of evangelical Christianity in France. 

— Reliable authorities place the number of evan- 
gelical preachers in this country at 70,760, the con- 
gregations at 126.109 and the communicants at 10,- 
561,648. Of various miscellaneous sects the preach- 
ers number 38,791, the congregations 10,763, and 
the adherents 7,179,755. The Roman Catholics re- 
port 6,905 priests, 7,663 congregations and a con- 
stituency of 6,800,000. 

— In religious mimicry and mummer}' the English 
ritualists are unexcelled. Last year they issued a 
"Priest's Prayer Book" which contains forms for 
blessing crosses, crucifixes, medals, monastic dresses, 
holy salt, holy water, holy ashes, etc. There is in 
that wing of the church a "Guild of All Souls," 
whose special object is the offering of masses and 
prayers for the dead. — Baj^tist Weekly. 

— The growth of the churches connected with the 
United church of Japan during the last year has been 
very marked. Twenty per cent, has been added to 
the membership, and the advance in contributions 
has been seventy per cent. 

— The Evangelical Alliance will hold its Confer- 
ence this year in the city of Glasgow, Scotland, com- 
mencing on Oct. 6th. Glasgow was one of the earli- 
est homes of the Alliance movement, and there are 
to be found many of its warmest friends, as well as 
some of its most powerful advocates. 

— The Russian Government has issued a decree 
making the Greek church the established religion of 
the Baltic provinces. Protestanism will only be tol- 
erated. Children born of mixed marriages are to be 
trained in the Greek church. The decree excites 
great discontent among the German settlers. 

— Not only business but also the large missionary 
organizations of the various churches show the ef- 
fects of the hard times. The Presbyterian Home 
Board is this year $115,000 short; the Foreign Board 
$60,000; the Women's Board, $30,000— a total of 
$205,000. The Baptist Boards report a shortage of 
$100,000; the Methodists are trying indeed to raise 
"a million for missions," but have a hard job on hand 
reducing an indebtedness of $175,000 still resting on 
their missionary agencies; the American Missionary 
Board (Congregationalist) wants $100,000 to come to 
its seventy-fifth anniversary next October out of 
debt; the American Missionary Association wants 
$53,000 to meet is annual obligations, including 
$13,000 shortage carried over from last year; the 
Home Missionary Society needs $30,000 to pay pres- 
ent demands on its now empty treasury, and the 
Congregational Union requires $15,000 to keep 
abreast of urgent calls upon its exchequer. 

—There are between 6,000 and 8,000 Icelanders 
in this country, among whom there are fouileen 
Ijutheran congregations, six in Dakota, two in South- 
western Minnesota, and the others in Manitoba. 
Pastor J. Bjarnason has returned from a missionary 
trip of nearly a month among the Icelandic settle- 
ments in the timber regions along the shores of 
Lake Winnipeg. He serves six congregations. He 
teaches the catechism to the children, as well as 
preaches the Gospel. A convention of the Icelandic 
Lutherans was held in Mountain, Dakota, last Janu- 
ary, when a constitution for an association or synod 
was drafted, to be presented to the congregations 
for adoption: The first annual meeting was held in 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, from June 24th to the 28th. 
Twenty-two delegates were present from all the 
churches, and all the Icelandic congregations are 
DOW united in a synod. The synod resolved that 
Sunday-schools should be established in all their 
congregations; and also, that a monthly church 
paper in Icelandic should be published. 

— The Danish Lutherans are active in the East as 
well as in the West A church was dedicated by 
them in July at Oxford, N. J., costing $1,500. But 
in the AVest they settle in large numbers, and show 
much push. About fifty Danish families have 
already purchased land in the new Danish colony in 



Lincoln county, Minn., and a church and high scoool 
will soon be erected. The Danish High School at 
Ashland, Mich., is doing a good work. This is not 
a "High School" in the form of advanced studies, 
but rather a school for the promotion of the Chris- 
tian life. 



SUSQUEHANNA FREE METHODIST CONFER- 
ENCE 

REPORT ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 



"Voluntary associations are not necessarily sinful 
because they are secret. But secrecy is always a 
ground of suspicion. Evil works instinctively in- 
cline to darkness. Good works grow up in light. 
God commands us to let our light shine. Even a 
good cause under the shadow of secrecy invalidates 
its claim to open and honest men. Grace and guile 
can have no affinity. All secrets necessary to be 
kept can be kept without an oath. A bad institu- 
tion ought not, and a good one need not, be secret. 
Philanthropic associations claiming our co-operation 
on Christian grounds, must do so with open face. 
They must lift the veil while demanding our saluta- 
tion, or we cannot salute them by the way. There- 
fore, all secret societies ai'e to be eschewed." — Free 
Methodist Discipline. 

This is the position of our church on secret or- 
ders. May we never be ashamed of it. May we 
never depart from it. If maintaining this position 
tends to keep us a comparatively small people, it 
also tends to preserve us a holy people. The spread 
of holiness is our mission. The toleration of secret 
orders in the Christian church is believed to be a 
formidable barrier to the progress of scriptural holi- 
ness. This almost universal and strongly entrenched 
foe of vital godliness and of pure civil government, 
we must continue to antagonize as occasion requires. 
But in so doing we need great wisdom. As preach- 
ers, if we antagonize secret orders in our first minis- 
trations on entering a new field of labor, or on com- 
mencing a protracted meeting, we may thereby ef- 
fectually blockade our way to the hearts of the peo- 
ple. This plant which our "Heavenly Father hath 
not planted," can be more easily pulled up root and 
fibre after a thorough religious awakening than be- 
fore. In all our efforts to eradicate this evil, may 
our position ever be scriptural, our spirits unctuous, 
and our guidance divine. 



LODGE NOTES. 



Advices from Shamokin, Pa., say that Mollie Maguire- 
ism is again rampant in the upper and lower Luzerne dis- 
tricts. Nine murders have recently occurred in the north- 
ern coal fields, and mines are frequently fired. Murderers 
and fire bugs go free and the coal and iron police seem 
powerless. The Mollie Maguire brotherhood has been 
(juietly organizing since last April. Coffin notices have 
been received by a number of the members of the law and 
order society. While disorder prevails in Lower Luzerne, 
sanguinary transactions are becoming alarmingly frequent 
in Wyoming or Upper Luzerne district, hardly a day elaps- 
ing without some dark deed being recorded. The crimi- 
nal record in the county about Kingston, Wilkesbarre, 
Pittston and Scranton is unusually great, the police court 
dockets being full of cases of every imaginable character. 

— Late on Saturday night, says a Pittsburg daily of 
Sept. 31, Cooper Percy, an engineer on the Pittsburg, 
McKeesport and Youghiogheny railroad, was shot by 
James Stewart, weighmaster for the same road, at Daw- 
son Station. Percy lived only about thirty minutes after 
the shooting. The principles in the affair have always 
been good friends until about a week ago, when both ran 
for the same office in a lodge. Percy was elected by a 
large majority, and Stewart was badly disappointed. On 
the night of the tragedy the men were at their work near 
the railroad station at Dawson, when they became in- 
volved in a discussion over the recent lodge electiob. 
Stewart finally became angered, and drawing a revolver 
from his hip pocket, he fired without giving an instant's 
notice of his murderous intention. The victim threw up 
his hands and fell over backward, only uttering one sharp 
cry. A gentleman, well acquainted with both men, who 
saw the shooting, says, "I don't think there is any doubt, 
but that Stewart became so angry over his defeat that he 
lost his head and shot the man, whom I had always known 
as his friend, without knowing what he was doing. At 
any rate his neck is safe enough. Nobody ever heard of 
a murderer being hung in Fayette county." And, of 
course, a member of a secret lodge relying on its power, 
would have his fear of the crime of murder almost taken 
away. 

— The meeting of the "Sovereign Grand Lodge" of the 
Oddfellowsin Baltimore, has resulted in patching up the 
(paarrel with the seceded branch called the "Patriarchal 
Circle." This was a kind of Knight Templar affair which 
wanted to manage its own grand affairs and so was 
kicked out by the Oddfellow chiefs. But a new rank 
having risen called the "Uniform Division," having the 
same general objects a compromise has been made and 
the two degrees united under the name, "Patriarch's Mili- 
tant Degree." What are these bellicose patriarch's get- 
ting ready to fight over? 

—The Supreme Council Sovereign Inspector General 



October 1, 1885 



THE CFRISTIAN CYISTOSUKE. 



for the Northern Masonic jurisdiction 
convened in annual session in Boston last 
Tuesday. There were present fifty-two 
active, three emeriti, and 378 honorary 
members, including Henry L, Palmer, 
Sovereign Grand Commander, and all his 
associate officers. The thirty-third degree 
Scottish rite, was conferred upon the larg- 
est class ever before the Supreme Council. 
Among those who were advanced to this 
highest degree were: Edward C. Pace, 
John M. Pearson, Lloyd Durant Richard- 
son, De Laska Miller, and Charles F. 
Hitchcock, of Illinois. 

— Garden City, of the Royal Arcanum 
order, furnishes a literary entertainment 
at its meeting Friday evening of this 
week. Dr. Kittredge will be present for 
much the same purpose as was Samson 
in the Philistine temple. A profane infi- 
del, member of this same lodge, has 
boasted to us that Dr. Kittredge was his 
brother in the lodge. "Be ye not un- 
equally yoked together." 

ANOTHER GREAT EXPOSITION. 

Visitors at the great World's Exposition 
during ics closing days could not realize 
that it was so soon to end and be but a 
memory. It was an exhibition of such 
great magnitude, of such unparalleled 
grandeur, so representative of the world's 
richness and progress, so indicative of 
great commercial and industrial possibili- 
ties, gathered together after so many 
months of incessant labor and at such 
great expense, and floally having reached 
completeness and perfection; and having 
through unfortunate and unavoidable 
circumstances been attended by so com- 
paratively small a portion of the people 
of this country, it seemed a sacrilege that 
it should now cease and pass from exist- 
ence. Prominent citizens of New Orleans 
and of the Mississippi Valley, feeling that 
its destiny had not been accomplished, 
that the great work it had inaugurated 
was not sufficiently advanced, determined 
that the great Exposition should again be 
opened. 

A new organization, for the formation 
of which steps were taken long before 
the closing of the World's Exposition, 
under the name of the North, Central and 
South American Exposition, has purchased 
the buildings and property of the World's 
Exposition, and will open on November 
10 and continue open until ApriF 1 next. 
A large number of the finest exhibits, not 
only of private exhibitors, but State Ter- 
ritorial and inter national exhibits, like 
those of Mexico, were suffered to remain 
in anticipation of a re opeuing. Already 
since the announcement hundreds of ap- 
plications for space from old and new ex- 
hibitors have been received and it is said 
that the complete filling of the seventy- 
two acres covered by the buildings is cer- 
tain. Capt. Samuel H. Buck, who so sat- 
isfactorily filled the position of Director- 
General after Major Burke's retirement, 
is retained as Director General, and Col. 
John W. Glenn, late U. S. Supervising 
Architect, is the new Chief of Installa- 
tion. 





Oi'woman making: less than 
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ea-y inoney-makiiig busiuess. We 
I offer energetic persons a splendid chance to 
make jiioney. Our |4 combination free to 
hose meanine business. Address A. E. Merrill. Cnleaea 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 
DR. T. FELIX GOURATJD'S 

ORIENTAL OREAM, or MAGIOAl 
BEAUTIFIER. 

PURIFIES as well as BEAUTIFIES the 
Skin, No other Cosmetic will do It. 

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Patches, Rash 
and Skin Dis- 
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beauty, and 
defies detec- 
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stood the test 
of thirty years 
and is 60 harm- 
less we taste it 
to be sure the 
preparation is 
properly made 
Accept no 
counterfeit of 
similar name. 
The dlstln- 

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ATsayre, said to a lady of the hunt, ton (a patient): 
"As you ladles will use them, I recommend Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of all the Skin 
preparations." One bottle will last six months, using 
It every day. Also Poudre Subtile removes superflu- 
ous hair without injury to the skin. Mme. M. B. T. 
GOURAUD, Sole Proprietor, 48 Boud St., New York. 
For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers 
throughout the Uuited States, Canadas, and Europe. 
WBeware of base Imitations. $1,000 Reward for ar- 
r«tt and proof of any one selling toe same. 





DR. CONANT'S 

CompoundVaporBatlis 

FOR HOME USE. 

Positive protection 
against Cholera, Malaria 
Fevers, and kindred ills 
demonstrated daily at 
226 Stale St., Chicago. 
Ladies— Room 5. 

Gents — Room 6. 
Call or send for circular. 



Sunday-School Papers. 

MONTHLY. 



IHE PEARL, 



To Sunday-schools, per quarter. 
Per year 



THE LILY, 



To Sunday-Schools, per quarter. 
Per year 



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12cts. 



3cts. 
12ct8. 



PURE WORDS, 



To Sunday-Schools, per quarter, 2 

Per year 



l-2cts. 
lOcts. 



SUNSHINE, 



To Sunday-Schools, per quarter 2 l-2cts. 

Per year locts. 

Single subscriptions for either one of the 
above papers, one year, 35 cts. 

We have excellent facilities for lurnlshing Sunday- 
School Supplies of every description including trade 
papers at publishers' prices. If you wish any publi- 
cation send to us for It. 

T. B. AKNOUD, Publisher. 
106 Franklin street, Chicago, 111. 

ANTI-SECRECY TRACTS, 

Orders tilled at the rate of ,W cents per 1,000 pages 
»t the office, or 75 cents per 1,000 pages by Jlall. 

Contributions are solicited to the T'ract Fund for 
the free distribution of tracts. 

In this series of Tracts will be found the opinions 
of such men as Hon. J. Q. Adams, Wm. H. Seward, 
.James Madifeou, Daniel Webster, Richard Rush, .Tohn 
Hancock, Millard Fillmore, Chief Justice Marshall, 
Seth M. Gates, Nathaniel Colver, President Finney, 
President Blanchard, Phllo Carpenter, Chancellor 
Howard Crosby, D. L. Moody, and others. 

NO. • NO. PAGB«, 

1 Historical Sketch of the N. C. A 4 

2 Voice of the Empire State In Condemnation of 

Masonry 4 

3 Address to American Pastors on the Secret 

Lodge 4 

4 Freema^sonry In the Family 4 

6 Pres. Finney on the Duty of Christians toward 

the Lodge J 

6 Warning against Masonry 3 

7 To the Boys who Hope to be Men, J 

3 Freemasonry Modern Heathenism 4 

9 Ministers at Rival Altars 4 

10 A Pastor's Confession 4 

Knight Templar Masonry 4 



12 Alexander Campbell's Estimate of the Lodges. . 4 

13 "The Secret Empire," 4 

14 True and False Templarlsm 4 

15 Secrecyand Sin 4 

It Selling Dead Horses 4 

17 History of Masonry 4 

18 Despotic Character of Freemasonry 4 

19 Freemasonry a Christ-excluding Religion 5 

21 Grand, Great Grand -. 2 

22 Masonic Oaths and Penalties sworn to by the 

Grand Lodge of R. 1 4 

2S Letters of J. Q. Adams and J. Madison on Free- 
masonry 4 

24 Satan's Cable Tow 4 

36 Address of the Niagara Association on the Mur- ( 
der of Morgan 4 

27 Judge Whitney and Masonry —Masonry Defends 

a Murderer g 

28 Nathaniel Colver and Howard Crosby onSecret 

Societies J 

29 Grand Lodge Masonry 1« 

30 Masonic Q^ths Null and Void 4 

31 Hon. Seth SI. Gates on Freemasonry 4 

S.S Hon. Wm. H. Seward on Secret Societies J 

31 What Great Men say about Freemasonry S 

36 Masonic Chastity 4 

87 German Tract: Why a Christian should not be 

a Freemason 4 

S8 Masonic Oaths and Penalties 4 

39 Should Freemasons be admitted to Christian 

Fellowship ? 4 

40 The Object of the American Party S 

41 Freemasonry a Religion (shown by its own au- 

thors) s 

42 Duty and Ability to Know the Character of Ma- 

sonry 

44 D. L. Moody on Secret Societies 

45 Ought a Seceding Mason to Keep his Lodge 

Oath? ' 

48 Tract in Hollandish: On Knowing and Oppos- 
ing Masonry 

W -John Qulncy Adams on the Duty of American 

® Voters 

50 Swedish Tract: To Boys who Hope to be' 
Men J 



MARKET REPORTS. 

CHICAGO. 

Wheat— No. a 853^ @S6 

No. 3 77K 

Winter No 2 90!^ 

Corn— No. 3 4'3)^ 43 

Oats— No.a 26 

Rye-No. 3 59^ 

Bran per ton 1'3 00 

Flour 1 75 @5 00 

Hay— Timotliy 8 00 @15 00 

Mess pork per bbl 8 55 

Butter, medium to best 11 @32 

Cheese 05 @10 

Beans 1 15 @1 30 

Eggs 17>.< 

Seeds— Timotliy 1 65 @1 75 

Flax 121 

Broomcorn 02 @ 06 

Hides— Green to dry flint 073^ @ 14 

Lumber— Common 11 00 @18 00 

Wool 14 @28 

Cattle— Choice to extra 5 90 @6 10 

Common to good. ..... 3 35 @5 65 

Hogs 3 00 @4 30 

Sheep 2 75 @4 00 

NEW YORK. 

Flour 3 00 @5 25 

'tVheatr- Winter... 933^ @1 01 

Spring.. 93% 

Corn 48 @49 

Oats 30 (^g40 

Mess Pork 10 35 

Eggs 16K 

Butter 8 23 

Wool ..... 13 @37 

KANSAS CITY. 

Cattle. 3 60 @5 40 

Hogs........ 3 65 @4 85 

Sheep....... 150 ®3 00 




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BIRNEY. 

The sketch of JAMES G. BIRNEY, 
candidate of the Liberty Party for Presi- 
dent, in pamphlet for 25 cents. A limit- 
ed number of copies of this handsome 
pamphlet for sale at the N. C. A. office. 

MASOKia OATHS, 

BY 

Past Master of Keystone Ij«<Sge. 

Mo. GJ?©, Ciiicago. 

A masterly discussion of the Oaths of the Masonic 
Lodfte, to which is appended "Freemasonry at a 
Glance," illustrating every sign, grip and cere- 
mony of the Masonic Lodge. This work is highly 
oommended by leading lect>irers as furnishing the 
best arguments on the nature and actual charac- 
ter of Masonic obligations of any book in print. 
Paper cover, 207 pages. Price, 40 cents. 

National Christian Association, 

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KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees of the 
Council and Commandery, comprising the degrees of 
Koyal Master, Select Master, Super-Excellent Master, 
Knight of the Ked Cross, Knight Templarand Knight 
of Malta. A book of 341 pages. In cloth, $1.00; «8.50 
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Furnished In any quantities at 



THE BROKEN SEAL; 

Or Personal Reminisceuces of the Abduction 
and Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 
By Samuel D. Greene. 

One of the most interesting liooks ever published. In 
cloth, 75 cents; per dozen, ?T.50. Paper covers, 40 cents; 
per dozen, $3.50. 

This deeply interesting narative shows what Mason- 
ry has done and is capable of doing in the Courts, and 
how bad men control the good men in the lodge and 
protect their own members when guilty of great 
crimes. For sale at ?21 W. Madison St., Chicago, bv 

THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 





ILLUSTEATBD EITUALS! 

Complete ■WOKKand"SECEETS": 

Kevised Odd-fellowship ; Freemisonrv. "degrees; Kui^ht Ternplaiiiin 
8lh to 14th Masonic desrees. Three volumes, $1 each. Knights of 
Pythias, 25 cents. Also other illustrated rituals, sent post oaid. Cata- 
logues free. National Christian Association, 221 WkS 
D^disonStreet, Chicago, Illinois, U. S. A. 



-••""-—-- m T 



iii^^CtmmU MMIIWIIIiilf 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CYT^OSUKE. 



October 1, 1885 



FAKM NOTES. 



A fatal disease prevails among the 
Log? in a section a few miles west of Be- 
loit. Wis., and it is said that at least a 
thousand hogs have died within two 
weeks past. Extensive pork raisers have 
lost entire herds. >Iost every farmer in 
Shirland. Ill . has lost from $^00 to $5(X» 
worth of hogs and soiie cattle. The con- 
tagion seems to be local as yet, and is 
confined, so far as reported, to the towns 
of Shirland and Rockton, Winnebago 
count v. 111., and Newark. Rock county. 
Wis. ■ 

Mr. Stephen R. Moore, of Kankakee 
county. 111., says that he has observed the 
effect of feeding green corn to cattle sick 
with Texas fever, and is of the opinion 
that it has done no good. It was supposed 
that the disease had been checked, but it 
appeared with increased virulence after 
the late storm. Mr. Moore states that all 
his cattle are dead, and !Mr. Goodwin has 
lost seventy- five. 

Six cows belonging to Mrs. Jlorris 
Mead, residing near West Diggings in 
West Galena, 111., broke down a division 
fence between her pasture and a corn field 
and proceeded to fill themselves on green 
corn, and when found next morninsj they 
were all dead and their stomachs burst 
ojjen. 

PLOWIXG-IX WEEDS. 

There may be some advantage in per- 
mitting weeds to grow on the stubbles, 
with the intention of plowing them in, 
provided they are not left long enough to 
ripen their seeds. A bare fallovv in which 
the soil is exposed to the sun and rains, is 
injurious to the land: it is far better to 
have the soil covered with some kind of 
vegitation, if it is nothing but the preva- 
lent summer weeds. Every crop of weeds 
plowed in, lessens the stock of weed seed 
in the soil, and does so much toward 
cleaning the land, if care is exercised to 
bury the weeds before the seeds are 
formed. An excellent method of cover- 
ing the weeds is, to loop a chain from the 
plow beam, so that it gathers the strip of 
weeds on the furrow slice, and as this 
turns, drags the weeds into the furrow, 
where they are covered in completely, and 
buried where they will soon decay and en- 
rich the soil. — American Agriculturist for 
Sept. 

STORING POTATOES. 

Potatoes are best stored in a dry cool 
cellar, where the temperature can be kept 
by ventilation, at about forty degrees. 
The floor should be of planks, raised three 
inches from the ground, and laid with one 
inch spaces between them for ventilation. 
The bins should he about eight feet long, 
four feet wide and deep, made of loose- 
barred partitions, wired together at the 
corners. A bin of this size will hold one 
hundred bushels, and with such a one, it 
is very easy to know precisely how much 
the crop amounts to. A box to hold a 
bushel wUl be found a great convenience 
in gathering and storing the potatoes. It 
is made eighteen inches long, fifteen 
inches deep in the clear at the sides, and 
ten inches wide, all inside measurements; 
thus holding two thousand and seven 
hundred cubic inches, or thirteen cubic 
inches (about two good sized potatoes) 
over a heaped bushel, which is two thou- 
sand and six hundred and eighty-seven 
inches. These boxes can be set one upon 
another, and then have a space left be- 
tween the potatoes, and are thus well 
adapted for use in storing a part of the 
CTop, or a small quantity for domestic use. 
The barred sides and bottom, secure abun- 
dant ventilation. The bins in the cellar 
should have a space of four inches be- 
tween the end and the wall, and between 
the sides; this is easily made by placing a 
short rail between them. — American Ayri- 
ciiUuriH for October. 

SA%-E THE CORy STALKS. 

Of the many things I admire in my Ger- 
man neighbor, none excite my respect 
more than the very successful way in 
which he manages his corn stalks. Ilis 
plan does not differ from that generally 
adopted. He husks his corn in the field, 
ties the stalks into bundles, stands these 
bundles into stooks, and when dry draws 
them into the bam, or makes them into a 
high, narrow stack, that is pretty much 
all roof. The Deacon and I do the same 
thing. The only difference i.?, that we 
propose to draw them in to-morrow, or 
or the next day, or as soon as convenient 
and the result is, that something happens 
to postpone the work, and before we 
know it the stalks are wet, and we must 



wait untU they get dry again. And some- 
times we repeat this process of waiting for 
a convenient time and November snow 
finds the stalks still in the field. Not so 
Mr. Jacobs. He does not wait. His stalks 
are frequently secure in the barn or staclc 
before some of us commence to h\isk. 
His cows and young stock arc in the field 
picking up the stray ears and scattered 
fodder, before thej' are injured by tlie 
rain, and before we realize what has bi en 
done, the field is harrowed to level down 
the stubbs. and the next day the hoys are 
plowing, and getting the land ready to 
sow barley next spring. — Joseph Harris, 
in Am. Agriculttirist for Oct. 



Qreat Bargains 

IN AXTI-SECRECY WORKS. 

For four months, hegi'nning >Jnly 1, 
we are enabled to offer the following- 
great bargains in onr literature: 
FOR ONE DOLLAR, 

The Christian 0>/nosmr four months 
to NEW subscribers and any one of 
the following selections of Books and 
Pamphlets: 

SELECTION NO. 1. 

HoWeu with Cords, paper 50 

Minutes of the Syracuse Convention and 
seven valuable addresses 25 

Proceedings of Pittsburg Convention, and 
ten addfesses by prominent men 25 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on Morgan abduction 05 

Freemasonry and Kindred Ori:lers Self-con- 
demned, or reasons why their members 
cannot be fellowsbipped by the United 
Presbyterian ehurcli. With an appeal to 
youus men. By Rev, J. W. Bain 20 

Freemasonry as a religion, by Eld. J, Day 
Brownlee 05 

A review of two Masonic addresses, by Eld. 
John G. Stearns 05 

C>jno>ure four months to new subscriber. . 50 



Total S1.85 

All for one dollar 

SELECTION NO. 3 

Freemasonry Illustrated, three degrees, 

paper 40 

Minutes Syracuse convention, etc 25 

Proceedings Pittsburg convention, etc 25 

Freemasonry as a Religion, Eld. Brownlee 05 
Review of two Masonic addresses, by Eld. 

Stearns 05 

Rata via Convention pamphlet 25 

Freemasonr}-, etc., Self-condemned, Bain. 20 

Cynomre four months, etc 50 



Total $1.95 

All for o'ne dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 3. 

Revised Odd-fellowship, illustrated, paper 50 

Holden with Cords 50 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self-con- 
demned, by J. W. Bain 20 

Freemasonry as a Religion, Brownlee 05 

Review of two Masonic addresses, Stearns 05 

Thurlow Weed on Morgan abduction 05 

CywjKure for four months 50 



Total $1.85 

Ml for &>!£ dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 4. 

Knight Templarism Illustrated, paper 50 

Holden with Cords 50 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self -con- 
demned, Bain 20 

Eld. Steams' review of Masonic addresses. 05 

Proceedings Pittsburg Convention, etc 25 

Cyiujsure four months 50 



Total $2.10 

A U ffrr wie dollar, 

SELECTION NO. 7. 

Finnev on Masonry ,35 

The Broken Seal 35 

Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 20 

Eld. Stearns' Review '.'..'.'.'..... 05 

Proceedings Pittoburg Convention, ete. . .' . 25 

Cyn/jKure for four months 50 



Total $2.00 

All for <yne dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 5. 

Hand-Book of Freemasonry, by E. Ronayne 35 
Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 20 

Eld. Stearns' Review 05 

Holden with Cords ,50 

Proceedings Syracuse Convention, etc 25 

Thurlow Weed Pamphlet 05 

(Jywinii-rt four months 50 



Total $1.90 

AU ftrr oii£ dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 6. 

Knights of Pythias, illustrated 25 

Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 20 

Pvcview of Two Masonic Addresses, by Eld. 

Steams 05 

Ritual of the Grand Army of the Republic 10 

Proceedings Syracuse Convention, etc 25 

Proceedings Pittsburg Convention, etc 25 

Holden with Cords 50 

CyyioHure tor four months 50 



AU f'/r (/rijt d/Mur. 




I The iilove is as good a rcpreseutation of Gaskell'o Cum pen 
coarse cut on so small a scale.] 



liiiiii as il is iiossiblfi t(i sive in nil oniinary 



The idea of publishing a COMBINATION for self-instruction in Penmanship on this plan is original with 
the author of this OOMPENIJiTIM. AVe have many very good hooks on this suiject, excellent so far as books 
go. But Penmanship is an ART that must lie acquired by well-directed practice, and the material for such 
praciice must be such as the owner can use separately from everything else. No one ever learned to 
write well from any book alone. 

Here we have Copy Slips, consisting of Movement Exercises for beginners, the Principles, Alphabets, 
Notes, Receipts, Addresses, Verses, Coninu'iu'emcnt and Closing of Letters, Ladles' Penmanship, Card and 
Album Work, etc., etc. Ornamental Worl^ on tlie slips and una siieet by it.self. oil-hand FlciiirlBhuig of Birds, 
Swans, Uullls, Scrolls, etc., and tTeriiuiii ToM, Old English, Pen Drawing, and oflier Leltcring Also a Book of 
Instructions, giving full directions respecting Materials and Implements, Position, Pen Holding, Movements, 
etc., all illnslrated with original engravings. After using the above tliey can all be put back into the Case, 
tied lip and laid aside until wanted again. In this way they maybe kept for years as neat and attractive as 
when lirst }niichased. 

The CoMi'ENDitiM complete, as above is mailed, prepaid to any part ot the world, for ONE DOLLAR. 
Add 1-08 9 

THE G. A. GASKELL CO., 

Box 1534 New York City. 



!mt^ 




new Lesson Leaf with two large pages thorough- 
ly hlled with able and evangelical ai.'s to the 'essou. 

IT COIVTji.IWS : 
1, Common version of the lesson text arranged for 
responsive leading; memory verses in brackets. 2. 
Revised version of the text. 3. Holden Text; Central 
Truth; Topic, and Outline, arranged as a responsive 
exercise. 4. Home Headings. 5. Introductory, in- 
cluding Review Questions; Connecting Links, and 
Opening Remarks. G, Lesson Dictionary, containing 
the time; places; persons, and contemporaries of the 
lesson, with the proper pronounciation of the names, 
and places. 7. Notes and explanations. 8. Questions. 

9. Review Exercises for the whole school in concert. 

10, Next Sunday's Lesson, including reference to 
memory verses and Golden Text. Conveniently ar- 
ranged, and tastily printed. 

Be sure and see this leaf before you order for next 
Quarter. Price, S7.20 per lOi) copies, per year. Address 

T. B. AKNOXD, 106 Franklin St., 

1 abllsher and Dealer in Sunday School Supplies 

""^.r.lPLES AND CATALOGUE FREE. 



L I B 12^ .^ I«-'Y . 

•■'■The Broken Seal." 

"T!ie Jfaster^s Carpet.'" 

'^Iii, the Coils, or The Coming Conflict." 

^^ The Character, Claims a)id Practical Work- 
higs of Freema.'ioyiry,^'' by Pres. C. G. Finney. 

"Jievised Odd-fellowship;" the secrets, to 
gether with a discussion of the character oi 
the order. 

"Freemasoiiry Illustrated;" the secrets of 
first seven degrees, together with a discussion 
of their character. 

■'■Sermons and Addresses on Secret Societ>£s;" 
a valuable collection of the best arguments 
against secret orders from Revs. Cross, Wil- 
liams, McNary, Dow, Sarver, Drury, Prof. J 
G. Carson, and Prests. George and Blanchard, 

National Christian Association. 

«9>I "W. Madinon St.. Ckioaeo. IIV 

A.T A. C3-3L.A.3SrOHI, 

BY 

Past master of Keystone liodgc, 
No. «»rt, Chicago. 

lUuHtrntea every sign, ptrip and ceremony of the 
Lodge and gives a brief explanation of each. This 
work should be ecattereil like leaves all over the 
country. It is so cheap that It can be used as 
tracts, and money thus expended will bring a boun- 
tiful harvcHt. .'}2 pages. Price, postpaid, 6 cents. 
Per iljo, ^'i.eu. Address, 

National Christian Association, 

221 West I5Ite<lis«n St., Cluca.S4». IM* 

REVUiED ODD-FELLOWSUIP 
ILLUSTRATED. 

Th'-'-orrijiIntn revised ritual of flje Lodge, Encamn- 
mcnt ;indli.-hfk!i IK ladle. 'Mlrgr.-^ prof riscly III ii.Mlr'i- 
t.-d, an-i gi(i,,ri£iilre,l l„ l„, „r,'l,ily ,„■, -unite; with a 
Bkelcliof llii-orlgln,lilHloi'yandr-|iaractcrottlic-oiii,-i-, 
over one hundri-d foot-note ijiiotatlonafrom sliiMdaid' 
authorUles, sbowing the character and tcaclilngsof 
Hie order, and an analysis of each degree by J're.sldent 
J.rilancbard. The ritual corresponds e.iactly with 
the Charge Books" furnished by the Sovereign Grand 
Lodge. In clot h,«1.0IJ; per dozen, 88.00. Paper cove', 
. > cenffl; per dozen M.OO. 

All orders promptly filled by the 
NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 
S21 W. Madigon street, OhioaKO. 



Tbe handsomest, spiciest 
original little gem you ever 
saw, into thousands of new 
homes, wo offer to send the Philadelphia 




LADIES' 

ome Journal 



AND 



HOUSEICEEPER 

t^WI'rom now to Jan- 
188H — balance of this 
year- -on receipt of 



c^s. 



silver or iStainpN* 



llliistriited by best artists, printed on tine cream 
tinted paper, and caretuliy edited by Mus. Louisa 
KxAPi'. Employs the best writers. 

Splendbd Domestic Stories ! 

by MsiE'Doii Marland, Mairy A1>t»ott ICand, Ifel- 
ei> WiiiM|«>\v« J4»li»i'» WHV, 4,'larisM» l*otter, 
Helm Ayi*e. 

A series of stories for the girls. Hints on dress and 
etiquette. I low to entertain &c. Mrs. Jjambert's 
h'asiiioii Letters, witli answers to correspondents, 
praotiuul and lae-pful. "How to dress well and eco- 
noinioaljy." 

"fecribbler'a Letters to Gustavus;" a rich feast of wit, 
humor, and keen satire, fo be read to husbantls. Writ- 
ten by Mrs. l!]nnnaC'. Hewitt; appears in each number. 



A page devoted exclusively 
to the care of intants and 
young children. Killed with 
interesting letters from sub- 
scribers exchitng ng views 
and methods of ma7iagement, 
and orit-'inal articles front the 
best writers. Heii)fnl. sug- 
gestive, and worth double the 
subscription price of the 
paper to every young moth- 
er. 




'^^^mmm 



A. Special 




Brush Stydf@s 



With special illustrations. 
Knitting. Crocheting, and al! 
kinds ot Embroidery. Kdited 
by an expert. Prizem iflveu 

r<M> COSltl'lblltiOBlM. 

Its hints and suggestions 
wiih regard to both old and new 
industries for women, are in- 
valuable. It 8h(tuld be ir. the 
hands of every lady in the land 
who has a taste tor art decora- 
tion or fancy-work. The illus- 
trations are excellent, and the 
patterns selected with extreme 
good taste, and written in so 
plain and explicit a manner 
ce will find no trouble in following them. 

<^;ivcH practical instruction in painting upon canvas, 
satin, silk, piush, woorl, china, marble; crayon drawing, 
painting in pastel, hammered brass work, Kensington 
painting, and all kinds of embroidery. 

With 
origi n- 
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trie d 
recipes C'tTitrilmted by subscribers. 
This is a Sihm-imI K' aturo with us, and 
is coii-^i'h-n'ti tli*- l>eMt and most 
pracdttal department ever pub- 
lished in any household paper. Prly-- 
vH Kiven for best I'ecipes aiii conti'i but ions 
How to prepare delicacies suitable f<>r at' 
ternoon teas, or small evrniitj companies, 
rhat ai-c not too (■xi)eTisive. The Hc)n)(' 
< 'ooltiog page, with its li''ii)S and hints, i^' 
invaluable to every practical honsekeept^r. 

mVHlVXJ. STITDIKS. by Margaret U, Harvey, 
are popular and he i^ful to beginners in music. 

Fff^OBCAl^ IIEPAKTMK^'T, illnstrated and 
(■ari'lu ly cdit-'d by Kben K. llexford. Letters from 
Kiibsciihers ami answers to corres|>ntid(nits on a I 
ffmsehold t'ipi<-s. It is the bi-st household paper ever 
rmblhh'-d; and so popiiiar that, in less than two vears, 
it has gaiiM-d neirciiialion <d* T«,<»0*» eooies each 
Issue. Ad.ir-f'^,-: 

JLAUIKM' lEO.UK JOUItXAL., Phllu., Pa. 



g 




I 



October 1, 1885 



THE CHRISTTAIT CYNOSITBE. 



15 



IN BRIEF. 

The Rev. Dr. Mayo thinks the South- 
ern people have done more for the cause 
of education in fifteen years than was 
ever done before by any people under the 
circumstances. 

There was on exhibition in Toledo, O., 
last week the largest steer in the world, 
weighing 4,350 pounds, and the smallest 
cow in the world, weighing 350 pounds 
and thirty-four inches high, and giving 
three gallons of milk per day. 

Clark Whittier, a brother of the poet, 
has laid out a town in Swain county. 
North Carolina, with a view of erecting 
spacious saw mills and for the manufac- 
ture of lumber. The town site covers 60,- 
000 acres of land, and the settlers who 
have reached the grounds have resolved 
that no liquors of any kind shall be 
bought or sold upon the domain. 

Kansas, about which the Eastern press 
are disposed to crack jokes about "its cy- 
clones and grasshoppers, drought," etc., 
has in ten vears, by accurate statistics, 
raised $1,046,362,264 worth of products. 
It is only an infant, yet stands fifth in the 
great wheat-growing States of the Union, 
It looks as if the infant might outlive its 
critics. 

Miss Marian Norwood, the actress, died 
Sept 9lh in Bellevue Hospital, New York, 
from burns received the previous evening. 
Miss Norwood was 29 years old. She at 
one time impersonated Eliza in "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin." Monday evening she was 
sitting in a rocking chair smoking cigar- 
ettes. Shortly after she lay on the bed 
with the cigarette still in her mouth. She 
soon fell asleep, and the burning cigar- 
ette set her clothes on lire. Her body was 
burned to a crisp before the flames were 
put out. 

An edict of the Spanish Government 
which went into force last year frees one 
slave in four every year. This will ex- 
tinguish slavery upon the island in 1888. 
A large planter from Cuba being inter- 
viewed, said: "Slave labor is not profita- 
ble in Cuba. I have owned and worked 
600 on my plantation, but now do not 
own a slave and hire all my laborers, and 
find it better and cheaper." The value of 
slaves has so decreased under the order 
for emancipation that thousands of them 
purchase their own liberty and hire them- 
selves out to raise the money. 

Of the 850,000 people in Eastern Rou- 
melia 573,560 are Bulgarians and 174,700 
Turks. At the close of the Turko-Russian 
war, which was fought by Russia to se- 
cure the freedom of the Bulgarians from 
Turkish oppression. Russia, as the con- 
queror, asked that the Bulgarians of the 
Balkan peninsula be constituted a nation. 
The Bulgarians desired this above all oth- 
er things, and Turkey agreed that such a 
nation should be constituted. But through 
the influence of England the Bulgarians 
were divided. About 1,400,000 were in- 
cluded in the country now known as Bul- 
garia, nearly 600,000 were included in 
Eastern Roumelia, and a large number 
were left to the mercies of Turkey. The 
present movement, whatever intrigue may 
be behind it, is the effort of Bulgarians 
to secure the union of their people, and 
it is likely to become a very important 
question in European politics. — Inter- 
Ocean. 



AN INIMITABLE SUMMER RESORT. 

The largest majority of health or pleasure- 
seeking tourists thathave not the requisite time 
and wealth to visit the mountain resorts of 
Colorado or the cool lake retreats of Northern 
Wisconsin and Minnesota, long for a resort 
that will combine the benefits of easy access, 
pure air and enough natural attraction to en- 
tertain and invigorate the spirit. Origon, Ogle 
county, Illinois, possesses the combination in 
the greatest degree : On the Burlington route, 
but 99 miles from Chicago, and reached from 
that point twice per day in less than four hours, 
with good and ample hostelries ; numbers of 
springs gushing forth pure and health-giving 
water ; the beautiful Rock river ; towering hills 
and massive rocks, one can well imagine that 
all the popular and interesting resorts of the 
continent have been merged together to be en- 
joyed at this delightful place. Detailed infor- 
mation furnished upon application to Perceval 
Lowell, General Passenger Agent C, B. & Q. 
R. R., Chicago, or M. L. Kttinger, General 
Ticket Agent, C. & 1. R. R., Rochelle, 111. 



HOESEOBD'S ACID PHOSPHATE. 

Very Satisfactory in Prostration. 

Dr. P. P. Gilmartin, Detroit, Mich., says: 
"1 have found it very satisfactory in its effects, 
notably in the prostration attendant upon alco- 
holism." 



Btandard Works 



—ON- 



S ECRET R OCIETIE R 



FOE SALE BT THE 

National Cliristian Associat'n 

ll\ West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

\ complete Oatalosne sent free on Application. 

In the Coils; or, tlie Coming ConfliJt. 

By "A Fanatic." A hiatorical sketch, by a United 
i^resbyterian minister, vividly portraying the work- 
ings ol Secretism in the various relaiionsof every- 
day life, and showing how individual domestic, 
social, religious, iirofessioual and public life are 
trammeled and biased by the baneful workings of 
the lodge. Being presented in the form of a story, 
this volume will interest both old and young, and 
the moral of the story will not have to be searched 
for. $1.50 each; $15.00 per dozen. 

Holden With Cords. Or toe Power op 

THE Secrkt Empirk. A faithful representation in 
story of the evil lutluence of Freemasonry, by E. 
E. Flaog, Autlinr of "Little People," "A Sunny 
Life," Etc. This is a t.hrlllingly interesting slory ac- 
curately true to life because, mainly a narration of 
historical facts. In cloth .?1 .00 ; paper 50 cents. In 

Cmney on Masonry. The character, clai us 
^D-d practical workings of Freemasonry. By Prec*. 
Charles <J. Finney, ol Oberlln College. President 
Claney was a '"bright Mason," but left the lodge 
sfben be became a Christian. This book has opened 
r.Qe eyes of multitudes, In cloth, 75 cent^; per 
oozen, f7 50. Paper cover, 3fe cents; per dozen. 
«8,B0. 

The Broken Seal; or Personal Eemlniscence" 
ot the Abduction and Murder of Capt. Wm. Morgan. 
By Samuel 1) Greene. One of the most Interesting 
books ever published. In cloth, 75 cents, per dozen, 
*7 50-, Pane covers. 40 cents; per dozen, $3.50 

Secret Societies, Ancient and Blodbrn. 

A. bock ctf great Interest to officers of the army and 
navy, the bench and tlie clergy. Tablk of Con- 
tests The Antiquity of Secret Societies, 1 he Life 
of Julian, The Eleuslnlan Mysteries, The Origin ol 
Masonry, Was Washington a Mason? Fillmore and 
Webster's Deference to Masonry, . . Jrlef Outline ol 
the Progress of Mason'T In the United States, The 
Tammany Ring, Masonic Benevolence, the Uses of 
Masonry. An Illustration, The Conclusion- 60 cents 
each ; oer dozen, $4. 75, 

Ex-President John Q.uir>cy Adams* 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obliga- 
tions and Penalties. Thirty most Interesting, able 
and convincing letters on the above general subject, 
written by this renowned statesman to different pub- 
lic men of the United States during the years 1831 
to 1833. With Mr. Adams' address to the peo.ile ol 
Massachusetts upon political aspects of lodgery; an 
Appeudix giving obligations of Masonry, and an able 
Introduction. This is one ol the most telling anti- 
secrecy works extant, aside from the Expositions. 
Price, cloth, *1.00; per dozen, I9.O0. Paper. 8£. 
cents; ner dozen, $3.50. 

General Washington Opposed to Se- 

CRKT Societies. This Is a republication of Gover- 
aor Joseph Eltner's " Vindication of Genera\ 
Washington from the Stigma of Adherence lu 
Secret Societien" communicated to the House of 
Representatives of Pennsylvania, March 8tb, 1837, 
at their special request. To this is added the fact 
that three high Masons were the only persons who 
opposed a vote of thanks to Washington on his re 
tirement to private life— undoubtedly because they 
considered him a seceding Freemason. 10 cents 
each; per dozen, 75 cents. 

OoUege Secret Societies. Their customs, 
character, and the efforts for their suppression. By 
H. L. Kellogg, Containing the opinion ol many 
prominent college presidents, and others, and a lull 
account ol the murder of Mortimer Leggett. % 
cents each; per dozen, $2,00. 

Secret Societies. A discussion of their char- 
acter and cla'ms, by Rev. David McDlU. Prest. J. 
Blanchard and Rev. Edward Beecher. In cloth, 
J5c. per dOB. $3 25. Paper cover, 15c. Perdoz.M.SSi. 

History of the Abduction and Mviraer 

o.'fCAPT. Wm,. Morgan As prepared by seven com- 
mittees of citizens, appointed to ascertain the fate 
of Morgan. This book contains Indisputable, legal 
evidence that Freemasons abducted, and murdered 
Wm. MT-gan, lor no other offense than the revela- 
tion of Masonry, it contains the sworn testimony 
Oi over twenty persons. Including Morgan's wUej 
and no candid person, after reading this book, can 
doubt that many of the most respectable Freema- 
sons in the Empire State were concerned In thin 
crime. 85 cents each; per doiea, |8,00. 

Reminiscences of Morgan Times. °"? 

Elder David Bernard, author of Bernard's Light on 
M9?onry This is a thrilling narrative ol the Inci- 
dents conne'^ted with Bernard's Revelation of Free- 
masonry, to cents each; per dozen, 11.00. 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. William 
Morgan. The genuine old Morgan book repub- 
lished, with engravinL'B showing the lodge-room, 
dress of candidates, signs, due guards, grips, etc. 
This revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
murdered the author for writing it. 25 cents each; 
per dozen, $2.00. 

ON FREEMASONRY. 

Light on Freemasonry. By Eider u. 

Bernard. To which is appended "A Revelation ot 
the Mysteries of Oddfellowship (old work,) by a 
Memberof the Craft." The whole containing over 
five hundred i)ages, lately revised and republished. 
In cloth, 11.50 each ; per dozen, S14.50. The first 
part ot the above work. Lighten Freemasonry, 416 
pages, 75 cents each ; per dozen S7.50. 

Hand-Book of Preemasonry, by .R. Ro- 
nayne. Past Master of Keystone Lodge, No. 639, 
Chicago, gives the correct or "standard" work and 
ritual ol Masonry; the proper position of each 
officer in the lodge room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, dress of candidate, ceremony of 
initiation, the proper manner of giving the signs, 

trips, etc., are fully illustrated and explnined. 
'irst three degrees. Paper cover, 36 cents. 

The Master's Carpet, or Masonry and Baal 
Worship Identical, exiilains the true source and 
meaning of every ceremony and symbol of the 
lodgOj and proves that Modern Masonry is identi- 
cal with the "Ancient Mysteries " of Paganism. 
Bound in fine cloth, 420 pp 75ct8. 

Freemasonry at a Glance IIluBtrates every 
sign, grip tad ceremony nf the first three degrees. 
f »p»t emwi, $3 pi^M. SiaglA eopy, six tmaSt. 



Freemasonry Illustrated. A complete 
exposition of the seven degrees of the Blue Lodge 
and Chapter. Profusely illustrated. A historical 
sketch ol the institution and a critical analysis ol 
the character ol each degree, by Prest. J. Blanch- 
ard, of Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations 
and nearly four hundred notes from standard Ma- 
sonic authorities confirm the trutlifulness ol this 
exposition and show the character of Masonic teach- 
ing an'l doctrine. The accuracy ol this exposition 
legally attested by J. O. Doesburg, Past Master Un- 
ity CZ No. 191, Holland, Mich., and oth rs. This 
is the latest, most accurate and complete exposi- 
tion ol Blue Lodge and Chapter Masonry. Over 
one hundred illustrations — several ot them full 
page— give a pictorial representation of the lodge- 
-oom, chapter and principal ceremonies of the de- 
grees, with the dress ol candidates, signs, grips, 
■stc. Complete work of 640 pages, in cloth, |1 00 , 
per dozen, S9-00. Paper covers, 75 cents ; per doz- 
en, $7..'50. First three degrees (376 pages), in cloth, 
75 cents ; per dozen, j^7.50. Paper cover, 40 cents ; 
per dozen, $4.00. .eS?"The Masonic quotations are 
worth the price of this book. 

Mah-Hah-Bone ; comprises the Hand Book, 
Master's Carpet and Freemasonry at a Glance. 
Bound in one volume. This makes one of the most 
complete books of information on the workings 
and symbolism ot Freemasonry extant. Well 

bound in cloth, 589 pp 81.IX) 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. A full 
and complete illustrated ritual of the five degrees 
of Female Free Masonry, by Thomas Lowe; com- 
prising the degree of Jephtha's Daughter, Ruth, 
Esther, Martha and Electa, and known as the 
Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, Wife's De- 
gree, Sister's Degree and the Benevolent Degree. 
20 cents each; per dozen, 81.76. 

Knig-ht Templarism Illustrated. A lull 
Illustrated ritual of the six degrees of the Council 
and Commandery, comprising the degrees of Royal 
Master, Select Master, Super-Excellent Master, 
Knight ol the Red Cross, Knight Templar and Knight 
of Malta. A book of 341 pages. In cloth, $1.00; 
$8.50 per dozen. Paper covers, SOcts; $4.00 per 
dozen. 

Grand Lodg'e Btasonry. Its relation to 
civil government and the Christian religion. By 
Prest. J. Blanchard, at the Monmouth Convention. 
The vn-Chrliitian, anti-republican and despotic 
cbaracler of Freemasonry is proved from the high- 
est Masonic authorities. 5 cents each; per dozen. 
50 cents. 
vuag-e Whitney's Defense before the 

liSAND LODSK OF ILLINOIS, .judge Ddulcl H Whit- 
ney was Master of the lodge when S, L Keith, a 
memb&r ol his lodge, murdered Ellen Slade. ,^udge 
Whitney, by attempting to bring Felth to lustlce, 
brought on himself the vengeance ^,1 the lodge, but 
he boldly replied to the charges against him, ana 
afterwards reuounced Masonry, 15 cents each; per 
dozen. $1.25, 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemasonry, 
as proved in court lu the New Berlin Trial. Also 
the letter of Hon. Richard Rush to the anti-Mason 
Ic committee of Tork County, Pa., May 4th, 1831. 
The New Berlin trials began in the attempt ol 
Freemasons to prevent public initiations by seceding 
Masons. These trials were held at New Berlin, 
Chenango Co., N. T., April 13 and 14th, 1831. and 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons, swore to the trutl 
ful revelation of the oaths and penalties. 10 centt. 
each; per dozen, $1.00- 

Stearns' Inquiry into the Nature and 
Tendency of Fkeemasonky. With an Appendix 
treating on the truth of Morgan's Exposition and 
containing remarks on various points in the charac- 
ter of Masonry, and a Dialogue on the necessity of 
exposing the lodge. 338 pages: cloth, 60 cents each 
per dozen. $5.00. Paper covers, 40 cents each; per 
dozen, $4.00. 

Masonic Oaths Null and Void; or. Free- 
masonry Self-Convicted. This is a book for the 
times. The design of the autlior is to refute the ar- 
guments of those who claim that the oaths of Free- 
masonry are binding upon those who take them. 
His arguments are conclusive, and the forcible 
manner in which they are put, being drawn from 
Scripture, makes them convincing. The minister 
or lecturer will find in this work a rich fund of 
arguments. 207 pp., postpaid ...40ct8. 

Bernard's Appendix to Iiig'ht on Ma« 
SONBY. Showing the character of the Institution 
by its terrible oaths and penalties. Paper covers: 
25 cents each; per dozen, J2,00. 

Freemasonry Self-Condemned, By Rev. 
J. W. Bain. A careful and logical stai jment of 
reasons why secret orders should not be lellowshlped 
jy the Christian Church, and by the United Presby- 
terian church in particular. Paper covers: price, 
20 cents each; per dozen, $2.00. 

Masonry a Work of Darkness, adverse 
to Christianity, and inimical to republican govern- 
ment. By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian), 
a seceding Mason ol 21 degrees. This is a very 
telling work and no honest man who reads It will 
think ol joining the lodge. 15 cents each; per 
dozen, $1.25. 

The Mystic Tie, or Freemasonry a 
Leagok with the Devil. This is an account ol 
the churcn trial of Peter Cook and wile, ol Elkhart, 
Indiana, lor refusing to support a reverend Free- 
mason; and their very able defense presented by 
Mrs. Lucia C. Cook, in which she clearly shows . 
that Freemasonry Is antagonistic to the Christian 
religion. 15 cents each; ner dozen, $1.25. 

Sermon on Masonry, by Kev. James Wil- 
liams, Presiding Elder ol Dakota District North- 
weptern Iowa Conference, M. E. Church — a scced- 
iug Master Mason. Publlslied at the special ie- 
quest of nine clergymen of different denominations, 
and others. 10 cents each; per dozen, 75 cents. 

Are Masonic Oaths Bindingr on one In- 
ITIATE. By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof ol the sinful- 
ness of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 5 
cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Freemasonry Contrary to the ChriS' 

TiAN Religion. A clear, cutting argument againsv 
the loJge, from a Christian standpoint- 5 cents 
each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Thirteen Reasons why a Christian should 
not be a Freemason. By Kev. Robert Armstrong. 
The author states his reasous clearly and carefully, 
and any one of the thirteen reasons, 11 properly con- 
sidered, will keep a Christian out ol the lodge. B 
cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Oaths and Penalties of the 33 De- 

QKEES OF "REEMASONRY. To get thcsc thirty-three 
degrees o. Masonic bondage, the candidate takes 
hall-a-million horrible oaths. 15 cents each; per 
dozen. $1.00. 

ON ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

Sermon on Odd-fellowship and Other Se- 
cret Societies, by Rev. J. Sarver, pastor Evanqe.l- 
Iciil Lutheran church. Leechburg. Pa. This Is a 
very clear argument against secretlsm of all forms 
and the duty to dlsfeilowshlp Odd-fellows, Freema- 
sons, Knights ol Pythias and Grangers Is clearly 
shown bj their conlessed character as found In 
their own publication!. 19 cents esch ; per dozen, 
n cent*. 



Odd-fello-wrship Judged by Its Own Utter- 
ances; Its Doctrine and Practice Examined In ths 
Light of God's Word. By Kev. J. H. Brocknjan. 
This is an exceedingly Interesting, clear discussion 
ol the character of Odd-fellowship, In theform of a 
dialogue. In cloth, 50 cents; per dozen, $4.00. 
Paper covers, 25 cents; per dozen, $2.00. Get man 
edition, entitled "Christian and Ernst," paper covers, 
50 cents each. The German edition is published by 
the author. 

Revised Odd-fellowship Illustrated. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, Encanip- 
meut and Rebekah (ladles') degrees, profusely Illus- 
trated, and guaranteed to be strictly accurate; with 
a sketch of the origin, history and character of the 
order, over one hundred foot-note quotations from 
standard authorities, showing the character and 
teachings of the order, and an analysis of each de- 
gree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual cor- 
responds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. In cloth, 
$1.00; per dozen, $8.00. Paper cover, 50 cents; per 
dozen, $4.00. 

Other Secret Society Rituals. 

Ritual of the Grand Army of the Re- 

PUBLic, with signs of recognition, passwords, etc. 
and the ritual of the Machinists and Blacksmiths' 
Union. (The two bound together.) 10 cents each; 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Knig-hts of Pythias Illustrated. By 

Past Chancellor. A full Illustrated exposition ol the 
three ranks of the order, with the addition of the 
"Amended, Perfected and Amplified Third Rank." 
The lodge-room, signs, countersigns, grips, etc., 
are shown by engravings. 25 cents each ; per dozen, 
$2.00. 

United Sons of Industry lllustratad, 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the secret 
trades-union of the above name, giving the signs, 

f rips, passwords, etc. 15 cents each; per dozen, 
1.25. 

Exposition of the Grange. Edited by Rev 
A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated with engravings, show- 
ing lodge-room, signs, signals, etc. 25 cents each ; 
oer dozen, 82.00. 

Temple of Honor Illustrated. A full and 
complete illustrated ritual of "The Templars of 
Houor and Temperance," commonly called the 
Temple of Honor, a historical sketch of the order, 
and an analysis of its character. A complete ez- 
pOBition of the Subordinate Temple, antfthe de- 
grees ot Love, Purity and Fidelity, by a Templar 
ot Fidelity and Past Worthy Chi«f Templar. 25 
cents each; per dozen $2.00. 

Good Templarism Illusti ated. A full anti 
accurate exposition of the degrees of the Lodge, 
Temple and Council, with euOTavings showing the 
signs, grips, etc. 25 cents each. ; pet dozen, $2.00 

Five Rituals Bound Together. "Oddiel 
lowship Illustrated" (old work), "Knights of 
Pythias Illustrated," "Good Templarisi^n Illus- 
trated," "Exposition of the Grange" and "Ritual 
of the Grand Army of the Repulilic," are sold 
boimd together in Cloth for$1.00; perdoz., 89-00 

Rituals and Secrets Illustrated, com- 
posed ot "Temple of Honor Illustrated," "Adop- 
tive Masonry lUusttated," "LTnited Sons of In- 
dustry Illustrated," and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated." 81.00 each; per dozen, 89.00. 

Sermons and Addresses. 

Sermon on Secretism, by Rev. E. Theo. 
Cross, pastor Congregational Church, Hamilton, N. 
Y. This Is a very clear array of the objections to 
Masonry that are apparent to all. 5 cents each; ner 
dozen, 50 cents. 

Prof. J. Or. Carson, D. D., on Secret 

Societies. A most convincing argument against 
teiiowshiping Freemasons in the Christian church. 
10 cents eac^' ' per doztn^ "^^ ce:?ts. 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Conspiracy. 

Addre.s.9 of Prest. J. Blanchard, before the Pittsburgh 
Convention. This is a most convincing argument; 
against the lodge. 5 cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

A Masonic Conspiracy, Resulting in s 
fraudulent divorce, and various other outrages 
upon the rights of a defenseless woman. Also the 
account ol a Masonic murder, by two eye-witnesses. 
By Mrs. Louisa Walters. This Is a thrlllingly inter- 
esttng, trne narrative, 83 senM ^cis- oer&tzea 

Sermon on Secret Societies. By Rev. 
Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The special object 
ol this sermon is to show the right and duty of 
Christians to examine into the character of secret 
societies, no matter what object such societies pro- 
less to have. B cents each; per dozen, BO cents- 
Discussion on Secret Societies. iit 
Elder M- S Newcomer and Elder G. W, Wilson, » 
Royal Arch Mason.- This discussion was first pub- 
lished in a series ol articles in the Church Advocat_ 
25 cents each; per doz $2.00. 

Prest. H. E. George on Secret Societies. 

i^ powcrlul address, showing clearly the duty ol 
Christian churches to dlsfeilowshlp secret societies. 
10 cents eacli ; per dozen. 75 cents. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State and 

C.iuKCH. By Rev. M. S. Drury. i'he antagonism 
of organized secrecy to the welfare of the family, 
state and church is clearly shown. 10 cents each: 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Narratives and Arguments, showing the 
conflict ol secret societies with the Constltui.on 
and laws of the Union and of tb". States. By 
Francis Semple. The fact that sec societies In- 
terfere with the execution and pervejt the adminis- 
tration ol law is here clearly proved, 15 cents each; 
per dozen, $1. 25. 

Sermon on Masonry. ByKev. j. Day 

Brownlee. In reply to a Masonic Oration by Rev. 
Dr. Mayer, Wcllsville, Ohio. An able Sermon by 
an able man. 5 cents each ; per dozen 50 cents. 



History Nat'l Christian Association. 

Its origin, sbjects, what it has done and alms to dc, 
and the best means to accomplish the end sought; 
the Articles of incorporation, Constitution and By- 
■Wwsol the Association. 25c. each, per doz. $1.50, 

Secret Societies, Ancient and Modem, 

AND College Secret SucrETiES. Composed ol 
the two pamphlets combined in this title, bound 
together in Cloth. $1.00 each; per dozen, 89.00. 

Morgan's Exposition, Abduction and 

Murder, and Oaths of 33 r-:rir.EES. Composed ol 
"Freemasonry Exposed, " by Capt. Wm. Morgan; 
■"History of the Abduction and Murder of Morgan;" 
"Valance's Confession of the Murder ol Capt. Wn. 
.Morgan;" Bernard's Reminiscences ol Morgan 
Times, "and Oaths and Penalties ol 33 Degrees." 

National Christian Association. 



^Ilf 



16 



TITE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October 1, 1885 



-N'EUS OF THE WEEK. 

WASHTSGTOX. 

PresideBt Cleveland Wednesday accept- 
ed the resignation of Dorman B. Eaton, 
Chairman of the Civil Service Commis 
sion. to takeefiect Nov. 1. 

The Treasurv Department is making a 
secret investigation at New York regard- 
ing frauds by undervaluation of imported 
articles. It "is alleged that three large 
houses recently paid the government in 
excess of JliO.iXX^ each on reappraise- 
ment of certain imports, and it is deemed 
probable that the sums to be paid by oth- 
er firms will enrich the National Treasury 
by at least $l.iV\liKX'». 

The U. S. vessels Swatara and Yantic. 
engaged in transporting $10. -400, 000 in 
silver from the New Orleans mint to the 
Treasury in Washington, arrived at the 
Washington navy yard Friday night. 
When the coin is received at the Treas- 
ury Department it will be counted — a la- 
bor which, with the present force, will 
occupy about two months. 

The Chief of the Bureau of Statistics 
reports that the total values of the im- 
ports of merchandise during the twelve 
months ended August 31, 18S5, were 
$571,235,943, and "during the twelve 
months ended August 31. 18S4, $657,- 
S71,316, a decrease"of $S6,635.373 The 
values of the exports of merchandise dur- 
ing the- twelve months ended August 31, 
1SS5, -xere $722,765,461, and during the 
preceding twelve months $735,018,792, a 
decrease of $12,253,331. 

Commodore Semmes, one of the ablest 
ofiBcers of the navy, committed suicide at 
the house of Miss Jane Jenney, near Ham- 
ilton, last Tuesday. Doctors of Leesburg 
say that the deceased had been in bad 
health for some months, and was thought 
to be improving. At about four o'clock 
Tuesday afternoon, however, being left 
alone for a few minutes he secured his 
razor, and while laboring under aberra- 
tion perpetrated the fatal deed by cutting 
his throat. 



The prohibitory convention at Cedar 
Rapids. Iowa, Wednesday, nominated the 
Hon. James Nickelwaite, of Mills county, 
for Governor, and perfected a State 
ticket. 

The New York Republican State Con- 
vention Wednesday nominated the Hon. 
Ira Davenport for Governor, General 
Joseph B. Carr for Lieutenant Governor, 
Anson S. Wood for Secretary of State, 
and James W. Wadsworth for Comp- 
troller. 

The New York Democratic State Con- 
vention Thursday nominated David B. 
Hill for Governor on the fijst ballot, the 
Governor receiving 338 out of the 380 
votes cast. An adjournment was then 
taken until morning to complete the 
ticket and consider the platform. 

During the year ended Sept. 1 last 
ilinneapolis exported 2,121,488 barrels of 
flour, against 1,785,450 barrels the previ- 
ous year. 

Every gambling house in Chicago is 
running. Lookouts are kept on guard to 
prevent surprises, but "ropers" and 
■'pigeons" are bringing in victims. It is 
said that Mike McDonald has threatened 
to prove that Harrison wasn't elected in 
case the gambling interests arc interfered 
with. 

A fire in the Chicago lumber yard dis- 
trict Friday consumed over 5,OU0,0u0 feet 
of lumber and an office building, causing 
a loss closely estimated at .$120,000, on 
which there is insurance to the amount of 
iW),(m. 

Five Chinamen, charged with murder 
and robbery, were taken from jail al 
Pierce City, Idaho, Monday night, and 
hanged. 

Disguised and armed men visited the 
Black Diamond Mines, near Seattle, W. 
T., Monday night, drove the Chinese 
from their houses, and burned the prem- 
ises. The citizens of the district main- 
tain that the Federal authorities make no 
pretence of preventing the influx of the 
Chinese from British Columbia. 

Bamum's circus met with a serious ac- 
cident Tuesday afternoon at Titusville, 
Pa. The big tent holding 10,000 specta- 
toTi suddenly collapsed in a violent wind 
and rain storm. Half the people inside 
cut their way through with their knives 
or crept out under the canvas. Twenty- 
five persons were slightly injured, but 
none killed or seriously hurt. 



Joseph Fisher and his three children 
were burned to death in their farm dwell- 
ing near Waubeck, Iowa, Wednesday 
night. 

Three inches of snow fell Wednesday 
in the Derby Line (Vx.) section. 

A huge red meteoric ball appeared in 
the sky over Conception Bay, Newfound- 
land, Thursday night, and was visible for 
nearly ten minutes. 

Three cars of a passenger train were 
thrown over an embankment near Warm 
Springs, N. C, Fridaj-, twenty persons 
being injured, three fatally. 

While in a drunken rage, Sunday 
night, at Silver Creek, a Pennsylvania 
mining village, Mrs. Sarah O'Neill 
dragged Betty Keefe, her husband's aged 
aunt, from bed and beheaded her with 
an ax. Mrs. O'Neill charged her victim 
with fomenting quarrels in the house- 
hold. 

Small-pox has broken out in a tene- 
ment in Grand street. New York, four 
cases having already developed. The 
source of the malady is unknown. For 
the week ended Sunday night there were 
216 deaths from small-pox in Montreal. 

Several lumber mills in Northern Mich- 
igan have been closed owing to the ten- 
hour law, the men refusing to work more 
than the statutory number of hours un- 
less wages are proportionately increased. 
At Manistee alone 1,000 men are idle. 

Superintendent Green of the Missouri 
Division of the Northern Pacific road, 
will be arrested for firing the prairie at 
Heart River, Dak., the flames causing 
heavy losses. Mandan was threatened 
with destruction by a prairie fire Friday 
but the citizens subdued it. 

Thousands of tons of hay and grain 
have been destroyed by prairie fires in 
the section about 'Traverse, Dak. 

Judge Powers of Provo, Utah, instruct- 
ed the grand jury that a separate indict- 
ment could be found for each day during 
which a polygamist had lived with moue 
than one wife since the passage of the 
Edmunds act. 

A four-year old daughter of Mrs. Par- 
sons of Goes Station, Ohio, was attacked 
and killed by a bull-dog. The brute was 
devouring the corpse vphen discovered, 
and had to be killed before it could be re- 
covered. 

A heavy rainfall ia New Orleans flood- 
ing the streets to. the depth of eighteen 
inches, and causing much damage. 

FOREIGN. 

Thirty-two. deaths from small-pox oc- 
curred in Montreal Saturday. 

It is estimated that between 40,000 and 
70,000 people attended the socialist meet- 
ing in London Sunday. The police did 
not interfere with the gathering, and no 
disturbance occurred. 

A report comes from Bucharest that 
fighting occurred Friday near Adrianople 
and that during the engagement thirty 
Roumelians were killed and three hun- 
dred wounded. 

The revolution in Bulgaria was appar- 
ently a surprise to Europe, and is creat- 
ing the deepest interest on account of the 
connection of the powers engaged in the 
treaty of Berlin. Semi-official advices 
tend to confirm the report that Prince 
Alexander of Bulgaria acted entirely in- 
dependent of Russia in annexing Roume- 
lia, and was impelled only by Bulgarian 
public opinion. It is considered improb- 
able that Turkey will accept pecuniary 
compensation for the loss of Roumelia, 
because the Balkan frontier is necessary 
to defend Constantinople. It is believed 
the Porte has resolved to fight in order 
to refctore the statu 'juo, but the fad that 
the powers are desirous of peace dimin- 
ishes the gravity of the situation. 

The feeling in St. Petersburg regarding 
the Rournelian question is hourly becom- 
ing more warlike. The sympathy of the 
masses is strongly with the Bulgarians. 
It is stated that the Czir has telegraphed 
the Minister of War to prepare plans for 
a campaign in the event of the opening 
of hostilities between Bulgaria -and Tur- 
key, as he is determined to support Prince 
Alexander's scheme of unity between Bul- 
garia and Roumelia. 

A London diapatch states that there is 
an increasing belief in diplomatic circles 
that a conference of the powers will be 
convened for the purpose of settling the 
Rournelian affair. Severe fighting has 
occurred between the Turks and Alban- 



ians, both sides losing heavily. The Ser- 
vian armj- is being mobilized. 

A wrecked steamer, on which was a 
wrecking crew of twenty men, ashore off 
of Grand Manan, New Brunswick, disap- 
peared during a hurricane Tuesday night, 
and it is believed that all on board per- 
ished. 

OXJIt CLUJB LIST. 



mow IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE! 

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Christian Cynosure to those getting up a 
club of ten at $1.50. 

We give below a list of papers which 
we offer with the Christian Cynosure at 
reduced rates: 
The Cynosure and— 

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Western Rural 3 00 

The Missionary Review 3 00 

Christian Herald (N. T) 2 75 

The Truth (St. Louis) 3 50 

Illustrated Christian Weekly 3 90 

New York Witness 3 50 

Union Signal 3 00 

Christian Statesman (Phila, ) 3 50 

The Interior 3 85 

The Independent 4 35 

TheS. S. Times 3 50 

Gospel Inall Lands 3 50 

The Nation 4 50 

New Tork Tribune, Weekly 3 50 

Chicago Tribune, Weekly 3 50 

Chicago Inter Ocean, Weekly 3 50 

Harper's Magazine 4 75 

North American Review 5 75 

The Century 5 35 

Scientific American 4 35 

Buds and Blossoms 3 10 

Pansy 3 35 

Vick's Magazine 3 .50 

American Agriculturist 3 60 

If any complaints arise iu regard to 
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If several of the above papers are 
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W. I. Phillips, Publisher, 

221 W. Madison street, Chicago. 



AGOODMANY 

TIMES ONE WANTS TO REFER TO SOME 
ARTICLE IN THE NeWS, BUT THE NUM- 
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TO ALL WHO WISH IT FOR ONE DOLLAR. 



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mm BiNssE 

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and permanent bind- 
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ARRIVES CAN BE EASILY ADJUSTED TO 
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YEAR, WHEN THE VOLUME CAN BE RE- 
MOVED AND BOUND PERMANENTLY, AND 

THE Binder is ready for 'the next 
year's papers. 

The Binde will be sent postpaid 
on receipt of the price, $1.00 



DON'T YOU THINK 

That you can send in a club of six 
or more trial subscribers at twenty- 
five cents each? We continue the 
offer of eight numbers of the Chris- 
tian Cyuosare to any address for 25 
cents. 



UUAVl AMD A Cln-istlan School, tits boys and 
VVMI t.HI4U, irfrls for the best colleges, business 
or teaehlnjr. Expenses very lo\v. Terms begin Sept. 
10, Jan. 5, Mch. 31. G. F. Linfikld, Prtu.. 

Beaver Dam, AVls. 

TODD SEMINARY FOR BOYS. 

Fall term begins Sept. 15. A delightful home, with 
kind, parental care, and thorough Instruction. Am- 
ply equipped for thirty pupils. 

REV. K. K. TODD, A. $1., Prin., Woodstock, 111, 



SLAW CUTTER! with 6 knives that 
always keep sharp, will slice a bushel 
of cabbage ui s'niinutes after some practice, also apples, 
carrot5, cucumbers, onions, potatoes, radishes, turnips, 
i&c, nicely and rapidlv. Sent post-paid for $;i. 

JOHN LOSHEE, Box 451, La Porte, Ind. 



fiaS' by ITiail "r poisonally. 
ituatlons procured "H I"ipils wIk'H eompetL-nt. 
eud lor circular. W. C. CHAFFEE, Oswegu. N. Y. 



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/~\Tr~>Tr"T — T Ik. Tf Morphine Habit, 
OJr JL U JM_! Opium Smoking; 

easily cured. Advice free. 

JjK. J. C. HOFFMAN, Jeflteison, Wis. 



SINGING BOOK.- SOMETHING NEW! 

**3Peace anti Joy " 

for Sabbath Schools, by A. LAGERQUIST. Address 
A. Lagerquist, Bracevllle, Grundy county. III. Price 
15 cents, postpaid. Try one. If you send postage 
stamps, send2e stamps. 

A H-PATTS Wanted! Rider's Improved 
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Holder. Aleuts 
have grand success. aiMDT 

Housekeepers wUl"'""^ 
have from 1 to 5. ft 

Send for circulars,]L 
and see what it is,* j-.- 
anyhow, _ ... _ 

E. W. R I OER, Racine, Wis. 



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Lesson Quarterly. 

Contains the same matter as the Light and Life 
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Christian Closure. 



Vol. XVIII., No. 3 



"IN 8EGRET HAVE I SAID NOTHING."— Jeaus Ohrist. 

CHICAGO, THUESDAT, OCTOBER 8, 1885. 



Wholb No. 806. 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 
221 West Madison St'^''.et, Chicago. 

J.P.STODDARD, General Agent 

W. I. PHILLIPS Publisher. 

Subscription pek tear $2,00. 

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[Entered at the Post-oflSce at Chicaefo, lU., as Second Class matter.] 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial : 

Notes and Comments 1 

The General ConveDtion 
of Churches against the 

Lodge 8 

The London Agitation and 

the Lodge in Prophecy.. 8 
Who Abolished Slavery « . . 8 

Human Ferocity 8 

Good Teqnplars 9 

Personal Mentiou 9 

Contributions : 
Social Purity in England. . 1 
"The Relation of Secret So- 
cieties to the Guilds of 

Medieval Ages 2 

Selected : 

What of That? (Poetry) . . 3 
Inhuman Crimes in Eng- 
land 2 

Atheism and Anarchy 3 

Facts of Lodgery 3 

A Plan to Evangelize the 

World 3 

The Secret Empire: 

Masonic History 9 



Correspondence : 
Danes Coming into Line 
with Swedes; Way-side 
Notes ; Mr. Hastings and 
the Good Templars; 
Jewett, Hastings, S e ■ 
crecy; The Warring of 
the Elements in South- 
western Missouri ,5,6 

Reform News : 
From the General Agent; 
New Hampshire Notes; 

Chicago Work 4 

Bible Lessons 6 

The Home 10 

Temperance 11 

Literature 12 

The Churches 12 

Lodge Notes 12 

TheN.C.A 7 

The American Party 7 

Churches vs. Lodgery 7 

Home and Health 14 

Farm Notes 15 

News of the Week 16 

Markets 16 



It was reportefl at Philadelphia, in the Centennial 
Temperance conference, that 2,250/100 persons had 
been put through the initiatory of the Sons of Tem- 
perance, and that $8,450,000 had been raised by the 
order. From other late reports it appears that this 
order, for years almost unheard of, has revived with 
the popularity of the women's work, and is initiating 
some 30,000 a year, yet losing al-most as many. In 
contrast with the actual advancement of the temper- 
ance cause by this order, consider what results the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union will be able 
to show when its roll reaches an equal number and its 
treasury so large an income. The difference is, the 
secret order spends and labors for itself, the open 
one for temperance. The prohibition movement is 
happily opening the eyes of men to the folly of this 
lodge business. Thus the Grand Lodge of Good 
Templars in Illinois shows a loss of thirty local 
lodges in a year, while all the while the temperance 
work has been going on grandly to a glorious con- 
summation. 

The Utah courts are grinding out the polygamy 
cases rapidly of late. The Mormon bishop, John 
Sharp, plead guilty to the charge of unlawful co- 
habitation, promising to abandon polygamy and obey 
the law hereafter. On account of his high position 
and influence, it is believed many Mormons will fol- 
low his example. Bishop Hiram B. Clawson would 
not abjure, and was fined $300, with six months' im- 
prisonment — the full extent of the law. Another 
who claimed that polygamy was by direct revelation 
from God received the same sentence. Judge Zane 
informing him that he was simply uttering cant and 
hypocrisy. The editor of the Deseret News, the of- 
ficial Mormon organ, plead not guilty, but testified 
against himself. He has been one of the most 
fanatical of the Mormons. During the past week 
ten cases were passed upon, only four pleading 
guilty. Many Mormons are leaving Southern Utah 
for Mexico, in spite of the opposition of Mexican 
priests, It is said, the Mexican Congress has grant- 



ed to President John Taylor and his associates large 
tracts of land in Sonora, Chihuahua, and other States 
near the northern boundary for the use of colonies. 
There are indications, however, that they may not 
be able to retain these lands, for the influence of the 
Roman Catholics is by no means yet gone from 
Mexican politics. A Mormon mission to India has 
failed entirely, but their emissaries in Europe con- 
tinue to send over large companies. No less than 
four, numbering some 1,200, have been sent during 
this year. The missionaries in England, emboldened 
by distance, threaten our government with the ven- 
geance of heaven for its cruelties, hypocrisy and 
Judge Jeffi'ey courts. 

General S. C. Armstrong of the celebi-ated Hamp- 
ton school in Virginia, has been reviving an interest 
in the Indian question in many localities. He be- 
lieves that the treaty-making policy so long followed 
by our government is accountable for many and 
cruel blunders and unspeakable outrages. The 
tribal-tenure plan has been diabolical in its influences 
upon the Indian and the greedy white man, a meas- 
ure for enforcing idleness and giving it a premium. 
The remedy, he believes, is in Christian education, 
the influence of the church and a public sentiment 
which Congress cannot disregard. He is in favor 
of some measure like that proposed by Senator 
Dawes, which treats the Indian as a man. The 
tribal system should be abolished, the Indian reser- 
vations should be opened to settlement, and each 
Indian should be given his proper share of the 
world's goods and be made to paddle his own canoe. 
Where the Indians are compelled to work they do 
well. 

Senator Ingalls of Kansas, has had also positive 
opinions on the Indian question, but it seems they 
were capable of improvement. During a visit to the 
Indian Territory a while since he, to his surprise, 
found out that they are making rapid advances in 
self-government, and so far from being the brutes in 
human form they are so often pictured in fervid 
Western oratory, thej' are displaying some admirable 
virtues, such as would adorn the most enlightened 
community. Among the 70,000 inhabitants he found 
no paupers, no one supported at public expense, and 
no one lacking a home. In addition to these rather 
remarkable indications of progress, he learned that 
there are no laws for the collection of debt, owing to 
the very creditable fact that the standard of com- 
mercial honor is so high that none are needed. As 
a result of this visit it is said that Senator Ingalls 
has become a warm advocate of Indian civilization 



The attractions of Romanism and of the secret 
lodges for the colored people have been often men- 
tioned of late in the Cynosure. Dr. Roy's observa- 
tions led him to regard the danger from the former 
as slight: while Geo. W. Cable in the Century be- 
lieves the blacks yet unlearned in the "evil charms 
of unions, leagues, secret orders," etc. We have 
evidence that they already know too much of them 
and the New York Witness notes some danger from 
the papacy thus: "The contumelious and irritating 
treatment of the colored people by several denomina- 
tions of Christians will have a strong tendency to 
drive them into the Church of Rome, which is ply- 
ing skilful means to obtain votes. Many negroes 
have already joined that church because it treats 
them like men and Christians, and the number is like- 
ly to be increased rapidly on learning the conduct 
of a portion of the clergymen of the Protestant 
Episcopal church in South Carolina. These singu- 
lar Christian ministers strive to keep out clergymen 
of their own church from their convocations, against 
whom no charge is made but that they are colored. 
These supporters of race-prejudice refuse to give the 
title of clergymen to any but white men." 



The action of the Post-office Department in re- 
quiring the new special delivery service to be con- 
ducted on the Sabbath has aroused the friends of 
that day to make a strong protest. There are cir- 
cumstances connected with this delivery which make 
Sabbath work unusually objectionable. The mes- 
sengers employed are boys — in Chicago 100 are em- 
ployed, and a proportionate number in every town 



of 4,000 inhabitants or over. These lads must be on 
duty during the day when their characters should be 
forming in a different school than government busi- 
ness, and the protest of the National Reform Asso- 
ciation should be endorsed b}' every Christian and 
patriot. This revival of a needed reform in our own 
country receives encouragement from the success of 
efforts in Europe for the sanctity of the Sabbath. 
In Denmark a society composed of many of the best 
people in the country has been organized to secure 
to workingmen their day of rest. In Holland some 
advantages have been gained, particularly in connec- 
tion with the Post-office. In Belgium two hundred 
luggage trains, which ran formerly on Sundays, have 
been stopped, and nearly 8,000 men employed in 
the government workshops have been set free from 
Sabbath labor. The movement is making progress 
even in Naples. Signor Seccarelli has appealed to 
the Italian House of Representatives on behalf of 
the railway men, and Protestants of all denomina- 
tions are being urged to form a league for the sauc- 
ti^cation of the Lord's day. 

— Since writing the above, it is with deep satisfac- 
tion we read that the Postmaster General has coun- 
termanded the order for special deliveries on the 
Sabbath. 



Chief-Justice Noah Davis, of New York Supreme 
Court, says: "My twenty-nine years of experience as 
Judge taught me that of all the causes of sin and 
miserj-, of sorrow and woe, of pauperism and wretch- 
edness, intoxicating liquors stand forth the unap- 
proachable chief." 

Here, in my opinion, lies one of the greatest se- 
crets of practical godliness, and the highest attain- 
ment in close walking with God — to come daily and 
wash, and yet to keep as great a value for this dis- 
co verj- of forgiveness, as if it were once onlj ob- 
tained and no more. — Thomas Halyburton {about 
1698). 



SOCIAL PURITY IN ENGLAND. 



By KEV. JOHN BOYES. 



Since the revelations of the Pali Mall Gazette of 
the secret forms of vice practiced in this country, 
the various agencies for securing social puritj- have 
been more vigorous and active. Homes for the pro- 
tection of young girls have been established in many 
of the towns, and agencies founded in some of the 
villages, that girls may have guidance and protec- 
tion. Soon after the issue of the Pall Mall revela- 
tions, an act was hurried through Parliament raisino" 
the age of protection from the age of 13 to 16 j^ears, 
though the latter age seems to me absurdly low. The 
enthusiastic demonstrations which have taken place 
in London and elsewhere, show that the public feel- 
ing is not to be trifled with. The unanimity and 
earnestness of the proceedings compel us to recog- 
nize their moral worth. There has been engendered 
a sense of shame that in our ver}' midst a system of 
criminal and almost compulsory vice should have 
existed. The new Ciiminal Law Amendment Act 
vigorously enforced will doubtless make such things 
more difficult in the future; and if the people will 
honestl}^ carry out the resolutions thej- have passed 
at the demonstrations, the maidenhood of the coun- 
try will be vastly benefited. There are man}- who 
rightly insist that the age of protection should be 21 
years, taking their stand on the principle that there 
shall be one law for the rich and poor alike. Mean- 
while we have gained much b}' the recent agitation; 
and if the people who are most affected l\y the evils, 
and those who are the responsible guardians of pub- 
lic virtue will act in unison in seeing the law vigor- 
ously enforced, much more may be done in rooting 
out the foul social leprosy. 

Of course in all movements we expect to meet 
with some who misrepresent existing facts. For ex- 
ample, Miss Muller, one of the speakers at St. 
James' Hall, London, declared that no man can be 
trusted. This is certainly an exaggeration, and 
surely in making the statement she did a gross in- 
justice to her own better judgment. A state of so- 
ciety in which this would be true would be about on 
a par with Sodom. While admitting that the tone 



w^ 



--* .i^ 



THE Cm^ISTIAN CYNOStTRE. 



October 8, 1885 



of morals is lamentably low with many men. we are 
glad to believe that there are othei-s whose morals 
reach a New Testament standard. If. however, this 
Parity Cru5;ide succeeds, whether in the form of the 
White Civss movement, as led by the chivalrous 
and learned Bishop of Durham, or by other hum- 
bler metho*.ls. in making men more careful of their 
own honor and more reverential towards woman- 
hood, it will be one of the greatest blessings ever 
conferreil upon our country. 

AYe know nothing that is wiser or more likely to 
be useful than the charge of Bishop Temple to the 
London clergy; and if the clergy of all churches will 
follow his recommendations, gotxl will result from 
the demonstrations that have been made. There 
seems, however, to be a serious defect in these 
movements. Little has been said hitherto about the 
connection between drinking and the secret empire 
of vice, though it is evident that drink is one of the 
rooU of the social CAii. There are also the baneful 
and pernicious fashions of the age to be combatted, 
as a source of unspeakable misery. It is not man 
the so-called --Lord of the creation." who supports 
the present extravagant and wasteful fashions in 
dress: nor who appears in fashionable assemblies in a 
state of semi-nudity. With the present incomes the 
vast majority of young men cannot atiord to marry 
and keep up an establishment according to the fash- 
ionable ideas of the hour. Young women nursed in 
the lap of luxur}-. and living in stately homes, are 
not likely to accept the modest home that an indus- 
trious and worthy young man is able to oiler her. 
The result of this is that marriage is deferred till a 
c-omparativelv late period in life, and a variety of 
evils are the result. We could wish that the heroic 
women of England would set to work to destroy the 
fashion and esti-avagance which make marriage im- 
possible, and celibacy a necessity for so many of 
our young men. 

(in'yn.ily. England, i^cj)t.. 1SS5. 



TEE RELATION OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
TEE GUILDS OF MEBLEVAL TIMES. 



TO 



It is a common observation that much stress is 
laid on the age of an institution; because very old, 
men tliink it must be good, having gone through 
many trials and crises: that it has good resources 
and has gathered many experiences, and will so be 
able bravely to face coming dangers.Hence we need not 
wonder that sometimes institutions, unlike ladies, 
claim to be of older age than is really true. We 
find this true with the lodges, many of which claim 
to be of an extreme old age. But let us look at 
their claims and see what they are and how thej' are 
supported. 

Before we proceed, we must do justice to some, a 
few. who do not believe these claims. A. B. Grosh, 
Pocket Manual on Odd-fellowship says, p. 25, that 
all these claims have been discarded as without proof, 
as baseless and silly stories; and in the ''Odd-Ftl- 
low' for July.1870, p. 436, they are called baseless and 
ridiculous assertions. 

It is impossible for want of space to name all 
those men who, according to Masonic tradition, be- 
longed to the secret societies, which were the prede- 
cessors of the lodges of to-day. 

Some Csee Pocketbook of the 0. F.,1868, p. 14) 
date Odd-fellowship back to the time when Adam 
happily lived in the beautiful garden of Eden, where 
God is said to have instituted him in the rite.i of 
Freemasonrv. The\' say there is an emljlem repre- 
senting Adam laying the foundation-stone of the 
"order" in the Grand Lodge of the C S. (Manual 
p. 24;. What are the historical proofs for this as- 
sertion? They are as baseless as for the assertion 
that Adam went out on steamboat excursions on 
Sunday. We will rather date the institution a little 
further back to the time when Satan rebelled against 
God: as for this we have at least the similarity of 
principles between the father, Satan, and his child, 
secret societies. 

Others find traces of Masonry in the building of 
the tower of Babel. Again no proofs can be pro- 
duced, except that there we find their principle, to 
show ever}" man that he is able to do good by his own 
power and faculties I'see 0. F. Manuel p. 45j, ex 
pressed in the blasphemous words of self-reliance: 
'•Let us build a city and a tower, whose top may 
reach unto heaven." From this time dates the ex- 
istence of paganism, and if Masonry desires to con- 
fess it is heathenism, then let them take this pas- 
sage as their proof, and cling to the rule: By my 
own help will I accomplish all. Let us rather follow 
the Scriptures and believe that we can do nothing by 
our faculties and power except by the help of God. 
Others trj' again to prove that Solomon was a No 
ble Grand, etc., but these claims have been mere as- 
sertions. They cannot be proven by a single line 
of historv. 



Such absurd claims that Moses, Aaron, John 
the Baptist, or John the Evangelist were initiated or 
held a high rank, rest on the same foundation, that 
is — none. 

•Brother" Cooper, in ISIO, (cf. Donaldson, 0. 
F. Text Book, 1S59, p. IS) says, that the order of 
Odd-fellows was founded by Koman soldiers under 
Nero. 55. A. P.. and were called fellow citizens, which 
name was changed by the Emperor Titus, 7!', A. P., 
into Odd-fellows. ^Ye should be very glad if the 
learned -brother" would have given his references 
and stated in which old, worn-out manuscript he has 
found this great historical fact. Perhaps it is to be 
found in Cicero, Horace, A'irgil, Martial, Pliny, or 
Tacitus? Or may be in one of the lost books of 
Livy? Any -'brother" finding it will please let us 
have it. 

We are referred to the rites of the lodges as signs 
of antiijuity. as it is said, it takes a long time to 
have them so finished, etc. I simply ask you to ac- 
company me through the streets of any large city. 
Do you see that building; how old it looks? Look 
through the window and see the workmen finishing 
up the inside and see the painter paint the curves of 
the brass pillars to make them appear old. To imi- 
tate antiquit}' is not so impossible a procedure. 

Let ns now look at the relation of lodges to the 
ancient secret societies. We ai-e referred to the 
Egyptian secret societies, their priests and rites. 
That they existed is true. Yes, they were secret, 
perhaps more secret than modern lodges. But 
there is as little evidence of an}' actual connection 
between the two as between the feathers of Gabriel's 
wings and the quills of a goose. And in essence they 
difler as mnch as an iceberg and a tornado that have 
only this in common, that they are both dangerous. 
Neither have the lodges anj'^ connection with the 
Greek or Boman societies; or, if they claim to be in 
connection by their principles, we will let them have 
this doubtful honor. These societies were made up 
of the lowest of humanit}', vThere the worst revelries 
took place, where the harlots abounded. 

The Masons claim also to have a connection, to be 
the successors of the guilds of masons in mediaeval 
times, but we can prove from history that they are 
entirely different societies. All know that in those 
times, the good old times for the trades, no clerk 
could or would be employed who had not served sev- 
eral years and made his examinations as apprentice, 
or assistant, and that no one was allowed to begin a 
business unless he had passed a strict examination. 
In order for protection against defrauders and impos- 
tors every trade from the meanest up to the highest 
had its own pai'ticular secrets (such as certain phrases 
of opening a couA'ersation) in which technical terms 
were used so that every impostor could be well de- 
tected. These guilds were in close connection with 
the church and not in opposition to the" church as 
the Freemasons of to-day. The guilds of the ma 
sons excelled ver}' much in their zeal for the church. 
Only pious workmen could be accepted as we see 
from the old statutes. These guilds did build near- 
ly all the great churches and domes and cathedrals, 
which to-day are the wonder of all builders and of 
all men of taste; and they did all their work for noth- 
ing receiving onl}' the materials for their sustenance. 
They built their cottages of light material near the 
building place and lived a peaceful life working 
busily; and when they had finished their work they 
traveled on to do the same work of charity at some 
other place. 

It is true they had certain rights and customs, 
but 3"ou can as well prove that the planets circulate 
about the moon as show that they are identical with 
the signs of the Freemason.s. They had certain 
rites of laying the foundation and of finishing the 
house, but they are entirely different from the absurd 
fashions of the lodges of to-day. 

Such lodges of church-building masons were also 
at London, building some of the churches there at 
the beginning of the eighteenth century. Some per 
sons of the higher classes frequently visited the 
structures and marked how the diligent workmen 
labored and the beautiful spires rose higher and 
higher into the air. As they had so much interest 
in the work, and by practice studied the science of 
architecture, the masons had the politeness to take 
them into their union or guild as honorary members, 
or, as they were called, "accepted masons." The 
churches being finished, the working masons went 
on to some other place. The accepted, non-working 
masons were kept behind, in possession of the few 
signs and phrases of recognition. They came to- 
gether, and began to come together in some drinking 
house for conviviality. But soon it took up the 
deistic principles which existed at that time among 
the people of the higher classes, and these they have 
retained until to-day, as has been satisfactorily 
proved to them, g, j. f. 



WEAT OF TEAT? 



Tried! well, and wbat of that? 
Didst fancy life was spent on beds of ease. 
Fluttering the rose leaves scattered by the breeze? 
Come, rouse tbee i work wbile it is called to-day 
Coward, arise ; go forth thy way ! 

Lonely ! and what of that? 
Some tiiiiat be lonely ; 'tis not given to all 
To feel a heart rspousive rise and fall- 
To blend auotber life into its own. 
Work may be done in loneliness: work on! 

Dark ! well, and what of that? 
Didst fondly dream the sun would never set? 
Dost fear to lose thy way ? Take courage yet ! 
Learn thou to walk by faith and not by sight. 
Thy steps will guided be and guided right. 

Hard! well, and what of that? 

Didst fancy life one summer holiday, 

With lessons none to learn, and nsiught but play? 

Go, get thee to thy task ! Conquer or die. 

It must be learned. Learn it, then, patiently. 

No help 1 nay, 'tis not so; 
Though human help be far, thy God is nigh, 
Who feeds the raven hears bis children's cry. 
He's near thee wheresoe'er thy footsteps roam. 
And he will guide thee, light thee, help thee home. 

— Every Other Sai unlay. 

INEUMAN CRIMES IN ENGLAND. 

I Cardinal Manning in the North American Review.] 

You may wish to learn whether these enormities 
were not alread}' known, and, if known, why they 
were not long ago exposed. The answer, I believe, 
is this: They were known as forms are seen in the 
dark. We are sure of their existence. Here and 
there terrible cases came before our courts or were 
dealt with in private. The state of our streets at 
night gi-adually awakened attention and caused re- 
monstrance. The efforts to check these evils were 
partial and intermittent. The extent of the immor- 
al world in the midst of us was altogether unrecog- 
nized; its organization and systematic purvejing 
and its almost ubiquitous activity were not only not 
ascertained but not even suspected; and, when sus- 
pected, were treated as incredible. Excepting only 
those whose professions and duties brought them 
into immediate contact with the terrible realities of 
life, the greater part of the upper and governing 
classes of England in London were more or less liv- 
ing in a fool's paradise. Our newspaper press has 
been, happily, singularly guarded and pure. In so- 
cial life such subjects are seldom if ever mentioned. 
Many men may have known of them, but the great 
multitude of women have lived and died without 
any knowledge of what passes in the very streets in 
which they dwell. Under the shelter of this uncon- 
sciousness every form of evil is multiplied. 

I will not ask whether our state is worse at this 
day than it was in 1820 or 1880, which was a period 
of extraordinary and barefaced wickedness. It is 
enough to say that, with the rapid increase of the 
population in London, a steady relaxation of all so- 
cial and moral authority and a perceptible breaking 
up of the domestic life of the people have continu- 
ally grown upon us. 

At length, the knowledge of these terrible iniqui- 
ties forced itself upon our attention, and in 1881 a 
commission took evidence and reported on the im- 
moralities in London, and especially on the traffic 
in young girls between Ijondon and the Continent. 
The revelations of that report fall little short of the 
revelations of the Pall Mall Gazette. But a blue 
book is read by few, and, except to those concerned 
— I may say to experts on the subject — the report 
of the commission has remained almost unknown. 
I have never so much as seen it. A l)ill founded on 
it, and intended to check these immoral practices, 
was introduced into the House of Lords. It was 
much opposed and weakened, and, finally, for want 
of time, it was dropped. The bill was again intro- 
duced in the following year, and with the same re- 
sult. Once more, in 1884, it was discussed, and 
again suffei-ed to drop. In the session of the pres- 
ent .year, 1885, it passed the House of Lords, weak- 
ened to such a point as to afford protection only to 
girls of fifteen years of age. The bill reached the 
House of Commons. As usual, it encountered con- 
siderable opposition, and, finallj-, was talked out on 
a Wednesday, on which day the House rises at six 
o'clock. It then seemed as if all hope of protection 
was thrown over to 1886. That is to say, five long 
years, still with uncertain result, have been wasted 
over a measure for which the vital necessity to the 
moral life of England ought to have obtained a per- 
emptory and prompt legislation. 

This heartless delay, full of fatal consequences of 
demoralization and wreck and ruin to the innocent, 



October 8, 1885 



THE CHBISTLAJSr CYTTOSTJRE. 



the helpless of our people, justly aroused the indig- 
nation of those to whom justice and mercy are more 
dear than the redistribution of seats or the disfran- 
chisement for medical relief. Prompted — T might 
say stung — by an indignant impatience, the editor 
of the Pall IJall Gazette, and other like-minded men, 
defying all antagonists, entered upon their warfare 
against the dominion of cruelty and lust. I have 
said elsewhere, that manj' of those who profoundly 
sympatize in the motives which induced the Pall 
Mall Gazette to take up the question might have de- 
sired its modes and expressions to have been revised 
and chastened; but that in such a matter of moral 
life and death, and above all, when the obloquy and 
calumny of the bad, and hasty and shortsighted cen- 
sures of some good men, were heaped upon those 
who entered the furnace to save souls, I should hold 
it to be not only ungenerous, but cowardly and cruel, 
not to stand between the handful of men who, for 
the moral life of England, dared this courageous 
action, and the whole world of their censors. 

The moral sense of this country has been pro- 
foundly aroused. Our public newspapers in the 
provinces, without number, have written with great 
ardor and indignation, and forty-one public meetings 
in such places as parts of London, Liverpool, Man- 
chester, and Sheffield have been held. In thirteen 
days the immense pressure brought to bear upon the 
Government has compelled it to promise that the 
Criminal Law Amendment bill shall pass into the 
statute book before Parliament is prorogued. If it 
were to be defeated by any of the means which have 
wasted the last few years, no one can foresee what 
might be the popular excitement and the indignation 
in the country. Most assuredly at the next general 
election, when 2,000,000 new voters, chiefly the 
fathers and sons of the working-classes, shall appear 
at polling booths, all those who have obstructed the 
bill to protect the children and the girls of this 
CO untry will meet with no toleration. 



ATHEISM ANB ANARCHY. 



Atheism and anarchy are mother and daughter. 
In modern times each has international opportunity 
of mischief. It was written of old that the fool 
hath said in his heart that there is ho God. In our 
day the fool hath said this in the newspapers and on 
the platform. He would be glad to say in public 
law, not onl}' that there is no God, but that there 
ought to be no family, no church, no property. 
There is a difference between anarchists and social- 
ists; but the most radical of the communistic and 
socialistic and nihilistic movements of our time are 
atheistic in origin. We must not regard these en- 
terprises of unbalanced men as unworthy of serious 
discussion; for they are represented by powerful se- 
cret organizations, particularly active in the great 
cities on both sides the Atlantic, and rapidly matur- 
ing, if not already possessing an organization that 
encircles the earth. One of the old Norse gods, ac- 
cording to the mythology of our forefathers, was 
asked to drink a horn full of water. He drank, and 
continued to drink, but found that the horn com- 
municated with the hollow scales of the Mid-guard 
serpent which encircled the planet. In order to 
empty the horn it was necessary for him to emptj^ 
the ocean. Now and then we are startled by explo- 
sions of socialistic and nihilistic and anarchistic 
conspiracies, and think that they are local affairs. 
In most cases they are the outcome of the interna- 
tional, organized activity of men possessed of little 
or no creed except atheism; and very soon, unless 
the national organizations are broken up, they will 
be linked together around the world, and only inter- 
national action will be able to empty the scales of 
the Mid-guard serpent. It is asserted, on very high 
authority, that most of those who commit such dar- 
ing crimes as have lately startled civilization, are 
detailed committees, who act under penalty of death. 
If they do not murder, if they do not burn, if they 
do not explode dynamite, they are themselves to be 
put to death by their own associates. 

There are, I suppose, scores of fairly well educat- 
ed and respectably well endowed men among the 
socialists, communists, nihilists, and anarchists of 
Europe, who hug atheism to their bosoms as the 
latest deliverance of science. A materialistic philos- 
ophy has led them, in part, to this series of ghastly 
negations. Materialistic evolution they usually ac- 
cept as a fact. Their own immorality, in many 
cases, has made them fit to be the dupes of these 
lies. Social vice and atheism have close relations 
throughout Europe. The Irish suffer, perhaps as 
much as anybody of the population of Europe; but 
they are not atheists, they are not immoral. Com- 
pared with other nations, the Irish preserve a verv 
high degree of social purity. It is not to be said 
that calamity in regard to famine and low wages 



brings on atheism; for, if this were so, we should 
find the Irish as atheistic as people in the center of 
Europe. 

Socialistic voters increase their numbers rapidly 
where atheistic notions prevail. In Germany, in 
1871, there were only 120,000 socialistic voters; in 
1877 there were 497,000. In the city of Berlin in 
1871 there were 1,900 only; in 1878 there were 56,- 
000. There has been a similar growth in Hamburg 
and in Leipzig, and in nearly every other great Ger- 
man city. The highest rate of suicide in Europe is 
found in the heart of Germany, and here the densest 
forms of blasphemy in the shape of materialistic 
atheism are to be found. It is to be accounted for 
in large degree by the depressing effect of heavy 
taxes, low wages and military conscription. Since 
1876 improvement has begun in Germany; but, on 
nearly every quarter of the horizon in Europe hangs 
a threatening haze of anarchy and atheism. The 
Mid-guard serpent begins to encircle the earth, and 
he will not always be content as he is represented in 
the famous symbol, with biting his own tail. A 
criminal in a prison on the Rhine left on the walls 
of his cell, not loug ago, this philosophy for his suc- 
cessors: "I will say a word to you. There is no 
heaven or hell. When once j'ou are dead, there is 
an end of everything. Therefore, ye scoundrels, 
grab wherever you can; only do not let yourselves 
be grabbed. Amen." * * * * * 

Mj' final hope is in the church. My final hope is 
in the imitation of him who went from house to 
house doing good. While we make this supreme 
measure of relief, let us organize agencies, national, 
state and municipal, of which the official business 
shall be to know the condition of the poor, and to 
publish it for all men to read. Let us bring the 
condition of our brethren and our sisters, and of the 
children in what we call the lower strata of society, 
close home to ourselves; for God knows how soon 
that condition may be that of our descendants. 
There is a solidarity in modern society. There is a 
solidarity among modern nations. If one member 
suffers, the whole organism suffers. Only a strong 
pull, and a long pull, and a pull together, and a pull 
with God's hand lifting ours, will save the poor from 
their distresses. A fair day's vvages for a good 
day's work — let us insist on that. Let us drive 
atheism out of the slums by appearing in them our- 
selves, with the light that never was on sea or land 
burning in our foreheads and in our bosoms. — 

Joseph Cooh. 

■ • ■ ^ 

FACTS OF LODGERY. 



Two brothers of the church got into a difficulty: 
each belonged to a different society. We will for 
conveniencj' call them Bros. P. and R. A commit- 
tee was appointed to adjust the difficulty if possible, 
but the church in api^ointing took no cognizance of 
of their associations, supposing all Christians, and 
of course would govern themselves according. The 
church appointed the majority of the committee 
from the same society to which Bro. P. belonged. 

Though it was a case in which it was hard to ar- 
rive at a definite conclusion as to which was right or 
wrong, and therefore it was very generally under- 
stood that each brother would have to make some 
sacrifice in order to adjust the matter. But the ma- 
jority of the committee being members of Bro. P's 
society, soon brought in a decision in favor of Bro. 
P. and expelled Bro. R. But the principle under- 
lying the whole scheme was so glaring that the 
church revoked the decision, and the brothers were 
then compelled to settle their difficulties from a 
Christian spirit after the church discharged that 
committee. That case was settled formally, but 
Bro. R. has always regarded that committee as his 
enemies, while the men who composed that commit- 
tee look at Bro. R. with a similar disrespect. It 
was only necessary to bring about something which 
would throw these opposing bi'others together in dis- 
cussion or similar work, for anj'one who had a his- 
torical knowledge of the fact to see it again exhib- 
ited if not even hinted. Yet such a spirit has been 
known to exist as long as three years', without any 
possible way of removing it. All growing out of 
the fact that members belonged to worldly organiza- 
tions. — Living Way, Memphis. 



Martin Luther on Church Festivals. — "Let 
all fertivals be abolished, mid let none hut Sunday he 
ohserved; or if people desire to keep the great Chris- 
tian festivals, let them be celebrated onl}^ in the 
morning, and let the rest of the day be like any oth- 
er working-day. For as on those days men do noth- 
ing but drink, gamble, (indulge in every sin, or re- 
main idle, they oflfend God on the festivals more than 
at other times." — Luther's Appeal to the Emperor and 
Christian Nobility of the German Nation. 



A PLAN TO EVANGELIZE THE WORLD. 



BY DR. ARTHUR T. PIERSON. 



After twenty years of almost constant thought, 
stud}' and prayer over this missionary' problem, I ask 
my brethren to consider the entire feasibility of the 
following measures: 

First, an ecumenical council, called in some of the 
great world centers, like London, New York, or, as I 
would l3e glad to see it, in Rome, the old heart of 
the Papacy; in Constantinople, the golden gate of the 
Moslem empire; or in Jerusalem, the very spot of 
our Lord's mart^-rdom. Let eveiy Christian denomi- 
nation be represented by commissioners clothed with 
authority; and let two things there be done: 

1. Let the representatives of every missionary 
field and work of the world be present, and like Paul 
and Barnabas returning to Antioch from their first 
missionary tour, rehearse all that God has doue with 
them, and how he has opened the door of faith unto 
the Gentiles. Let the facts be presented, that over- 
whelming mass of testimony which shows that never 
since the vv^orld began have such stupendous move- 
ments been known, such startling divine interposi- 
tions, as during the last hundred years of modern 
missions. Let it be established in the mouth of 
scores of missionaries from the pillars of Hercules 
to the golden gate of California, that God has flung 
wide open the ports and portals of sealed empires, 
and hurled to the ground the walls and barriers of 
ancient creeds and customs; how he has brought all 
nations into neighborhood, and woven together by 
the shuttles of commerce and civilization the ver}' 
history and destiny of the whole human family; let 
the Christian world be compelled to confront the 
evidence that no expenditure of men, money and 
means has ever brought such rapid and rich returns 
as the missionary enterprise: that even the apparent 
waste of heroic lives has been but the breaking of 
the alabaster box, filling the whole habitable world 
with the perfume of unselfish piety, and impelling to 
its imitation. Let the testimonies come in from the 
Hawaiin Isles, first fruit of the sea unto God; 
from India, the very armageddon of the ages; from 
Syria, where the Lord himself sanctified the soil with 
his blood; from Japan, striding as with the seven 
leagued boots toward a Christian civilization; from 
Ethiopia, stretching forth her black and manacled 
hands to God; from Madagascar, which promises to 
be the angel standing at the eastern gateway of the 
Dark Continent to sound the Gospel trumpet; from 
the eastern archipelagoes, pointing a thousand church 
spires like mute fingers unto the sky; from papal 
France and Italj', breaking loose from the bonds of 
a thousand j'ears of priestcraft, popular superstition 
and bloody inquisition, to welcome the pure Gospel. 
Let all the Christian church be aroused from apathy 
and lethargy by hearing a thousand trumpets like 
the sound of many celestial thunders mingling their 
voices, declaring how the kingdoms of the world are 
alread}' being ground to powder before the stone cut 
out of the mountain without hands! Facts are the 
fingers of God! let them write as in letters of fire on 
the walls of our cathedral churches and palaces of 
selfishness, till luxury- and carnalitj- shall tremble to 
reflect how the very vessels of the temple that should 
be used in conve3-ing the Gospel are on the banquet 
tables of mammon! 

2. Then let the whole world-field be mapped out, 
and divided and distributed among the evangelical 
tlenominations of Christendom, so that every pro- 
vince and district shall be under competent and re- 
sponsible care. In order to prevent waste of re- 
sources, and undue friction, and the shameful spec- 
tacle of antagonizing sects divided in the very face 
of a united foe, let other denominations now mag- 
nanimously withdraw from fields where one or two 
denominations are already successfully working and 
established, and have ''ightor priority; let the great 
purpose and motto be, occupation of destitute fields 
and evangelization, where, as j'et, no missions have 
reached. Let there be an amicable adjustment of 
the boundaries of each field, and an agreement upon 
the principles of mutual comitj' and co-operation. 
But above all, let no field be left unprovided for, in 
all the world. The monks of the Middle Ages set us 
an example which might well be revived in these 
days, when they went in companies of twelve, elect- 
ing one of their number as a captain, and took pos- 
session of unoccupied territor}- for Christ. Under 
the inspiration of Dr. Judsou Smith's enthusiasm, 
the Oberlin Band was recently formed, to take as a 
field the province of Shensi, China, and twelve grad 
nates with their wives are to be scattered over that 
province to possess it for the Master. 

Is it not high time that we, who look for, should 
also hasten the coming of the Lord b}' speedil}' preach- 
ing the Gospel, as a witness in all the world to every 
living creature? — Words and Weapons. 



SB 



THE CHBISTIAK CrOTOBtrBE. 



October 8, 1885 



JS'E WHAMPSHIRE NO TIUH. 



CHAXOE OF TIME. 

Owing to the meeting of the X. H. A. C. Conference 
at Concord. Oct 31-25. the annual meeting of the N. H. 
Christian Association is deferred one week, to Oct. 27, 
2S. and 29. in the Advent church at East Rochester. El- 
der H L. Hastings of Boston, and Eider Isaac Hyatt of 
Gilford Village are among our speakers. Full pro- 
gramme will be published as soon as possible. 

A. H. Lamprey. Pres. 

S. C. Kimball. Sec'ii. 



Reform News. 



FROM THE GEJS'ERAL AOENT. 



WHAT A LEOTCRER MAT AND SHOrLP ACCOMPLISH. 



Sataxxa. 111., Sept. 2Sth, 1SS5. 

The Sabbatli I spent at Byron, preaching twice, 
and have just reached this point on the way to Mo- 
line. During the trip I have been more than ever 
impressed with the ahsohtte necessity of having every 
available and competent man in the field, pressing the 
work to the utmost. Wherever I go the really good 
people, those who live in the light, are anxious for 
the truth. They want no superficial presentations 
of the subject, for the era of curiosity is largely- 
passed. Thorough, candid discussion only will meet 
the present demand. The jJbople want to know the 
influence of lodgery in business, in court decisions, 
and in the church. Every neighborhood furnishes 
cases that are vexatious, and parties who have suf- 
fered want the mystery solved. The lecturer who 
can do this will readily obtain a hearing and find 
friends acd iissistance. Every one who takes up 
this subject at its present advanced stage should 
understand that thoroughness is a prime requisite to 
suc-cess. Only those who study the system with 
care and possess themselves of its material facts will 
find their services in demand. Xo lecturer should 
venture upon the field until he has systematized his 
thoughts and arguments and carefully arranged his 
facts, so as to defy assault from opponents. Three 
thoroughly prepared and carefully written lectures 
is the very least that should be considered sufficient 
to make a beginning. These should be revised and 
re-written a half scora of times, if need be, and con- 
densed into the smallest possible compass consistent 
with perspicuity. It may not be necessary, indeed 
it is generally better not to be encumbered with a 
full manuscript, but it is necessary to write, and to 
write very carefully, and the men are exceptional 
who will succeed for any length of time without it. 
In nine cases out of ten they will wander through a 
kind of "hop. skip and jump" talk, for which the 
best thinkers in the audience will neither pray or 
pav, because it is not what they want. 

There are points where a single speech will do 
20od by fixing a few points and calling attention to 
the subject, but in my judgment the rule should be 
not less than three meetings at any point of impor- 
tance. The first I would devote largeh' to awaken- 
ing inquiry, and raising questions, with sufficient of 
exposition to set the people to talking. Give the 
plain, pointed, unvarnished truth at the second 
meeting and back up ever}' statement with the proof. 
Bv the third meeting, by using diligence, you will 
have gathered facts and incidents in the coinmunit}- 
which can be thrown in to illustrate a prepared lec- 
ture and clinch the arguments presented. Make 
mreot local facts and then use them fully, but not 
in an offensive or defiant manner. Kindly, but 
firmly, challenge a denial, and if an}' one comes for- 
ward to refute your statements, treat him with the 
utmost courtesy. Vjut never permit an opponent to 
withdraw under any circumstances until he is pushed 
to the wall and you have gained a clear victory for 
the truth. When this point is gained, it will be not 
onlv safe but very helpful to take a collection, and 
urge the circulation of reform literature. People 
wiTl not subscribe for the Cynosure or invest their 
money in our literature until they see the efficiency 
of our work and become interested in its prosecution. 

r;00I> MEETING.S WITH THE SWEDISH JiRETHREX. 

MoLiXE, III. — My first evening here was spent 
with the students of Augustsina College. I took 
supper with them in their Vjoarding hall and after- 
wards spoke in the chapel. Several of the profess- 
ors and about two hundred of the students were 
present and gave close attention. Prof. li. F. Weid- 
ner opened and closed the services with brief but 
fervent words of prayer. I felt that in addres.sing 
so many who are soon to be the thoughts men and 
pastors among such a growing and thrifty portion of 
our population, a great opportunit}- was given me. 
Should my life Vje spared, and should T continue in 
my present relation with the anti-lodge reform, I hope 



to meet some of these strong young men on their 
fields of labor and bear a hand with them in the 
conflict against the powers of darkness. 

My second meeting was in the Swedish Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran church. Kev. H. 0. Lindeblad pastor. 
The evening was ilark and the rain fell fast, but in 
spite of every obstacle there was a large and orderly 
audience, composed of young and middle-aged men, 
with perhaps se\euty-tive ladies who had courage to 
••staud the storm." There had been no bills distrib- 
uted, or notice in the papers, simply an announce 
ment from the pulpit on Sabbath, and the pastor 
tells me he was greatly surprised at seeing so large 
a number of the secretists, not accustomed to attend 
at his church, coming in. The wonder was howthej' 
found it out. A number of Odd fellows came forward 
after the benediction to make inquiry, and the man 
who seemed leader among them said he had taken 
eight degrees. I replied, "You reckon the iniatory 
degree and degree of Rebeka, I suppose," to vyhich 
he assented. 

One gentlemen said : "The secret societies are 
doing more good in this town than the churches." 
I asked, "Are you a believer in the Bible ?" He re- 
plied, "Yes, and would like to be a Lutheran, but 
they won't take me in because I belong to the lodge." 
"Then," said I, "you think this town could better 
dispense with the church and their Sabbath, and 
prayer services, than with their lodges and their 
secret night meetings, from which the larger part of 
your population are excluded ?" He then modified 
his first statement hx saying, "I mean pecuniary ad- 
vantages." I then endeavored to show him how the 
secret lodges are making paupers for the church and 
state to take care of, while the influence of the church 
is to prevent pauperism and crime, and so we parted. 

M\' third service was with Bro. Lindeblad, and 
although the weather continued unfavorable, I was 
gratified to meet a full house promptly at 7:30. On 
the previous evening we left "John" kneeling at the 
altar where he took his first oath and fortunately 
found him again just where we parted from him the 
night before. The crowd were anxious to see the 
poor fellow through, if possible, and so by the aid 
of mj' charts we went on and down the slimy way 
for an hour and a half, when we had reached the 
"Royal Arch," and I proposed to stay further pro- 
ceedings, but cries of "Go on," coming from all 
quarters, and the pastor assenting, we spent another 
half hour under the "Living Arch," along the ''Bough 
and Bugged road" between Bablyon and Jerusalem, 
and left poor John suspended in the "vault" with 
the rope seven times around his body. The pastor 
spoke a few well-chosen words of commendation and 
i nvited all to extend the notice and return with their 
friends to see how poor John got through, and the 
services closed with the benediction. 

There was no diminution in numbers or apparent 
lack of interest at m}- fourth lecture last evening, 
though condition of streets and weather were very 
little improved. This is certainly a very important 
center, and in strengthening, encouraging and in- 
structing those gathered in and about this fountain 
of knowledge a wide field is reached. The enemy 
has not overlooked this point, and in the interests of 
his "Grand Lodge" below has established, I am told, 
not less than fourteen secret mutual protective bene- 
fit insurance lodges among the industrial and opera- 
tive classes gathered here. So far I have dealt 
mostly with Freemasonry, with occasional reference 
to the minor orders, but have promised, D. V., to 
return and devote a few evenings to the minororders 
included in the one "Secret Empire." The college 
and the Evangelical Swedish Lutheran church include 
the less as well as the greater in their testimony, 
refusing church fellowship to all adherents of secret 
orders. 

The Swedish Lutheran church here is the largest 
and finest in the city. It has an audience room 100 
by 58 feet, and a seating capacity of about 1,200. 
Its present membership is 1,1.35 and the Sabbath 
school averages near 300. The pastor's salary is 
81.000, the organ cost $2,800, and the whole prop- 
erty belonging to the church, including the parson- 
age, is valued at $40,000. The congregation main- 
tain a school in the Swedish language eight 
months in the year, which has an attendance at pres- 
ent of 110 pupils. Since this church, with all its 
auxiliary agencies, takes open and decided ineasures 
against all secret societies, it should have honorable 
recognition among the factors in the great struggle 
against the lodge power. In this manufacturing 
town it is exerting an untold influence for good, and 
is, so far as I can learn, the only Christian body 
that rebukes the impudent and brazen-faced rival of 
the Bride of Christ, 

The W. C. T. U. have placed barrels containing 
"Ice Water, Free," at convenient distances along the 
principal streets, which iscertainly to be commended, 
but I hear of no warning voice from these friends 



of the poor and out-cast against the night lodges 
that are ruining more homes, making more drunk- 
ards, and sending more souls to perdition, than thej'^ 
are saving by all their ingenious methods. Whj'^ 
not attack and remove the strongest bulwark of the 
dram-shop, and then the drink demon and his vic- 
tims will disappear. Ice water ma}' relieve the 
drunkard's thirst, but it will never dry up the foun- 
tain so long as the lodge separates households and 
leads its victims to altars of Christless pagan wor- 
ships. J. P. Stoddard. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE NOTES. 



New MarivET, N. H., Oct. 1, 1885. 
The New Hampshire Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union held its annual meeting at Great Falls, 
Sept. 29-30. It was a very enthusiastic and success- 
ful convention. Miss Anna Gordon, of Illinois 
(Miss Willard's armor-bearer), addressed 500 tem 
perance children, who entered the church in a body 
in a very happ}' manner. The church was crowded 
to hear President Frances E. Willard. She said they 
had dealt directly with the saloon-keepers and legis- 
latures, with only partial success, and now the}' pro- 
pose to appeal to the people, to the voters. She 
said three-fourths of the church members were 
women, owing to the demoralizing effect of liquor on 
men. She triumphantly vindicated St. John, and 
plead for political action and woman suffrage. No 
doubt the saloon keeps men out of the church, but 
there are many total abstainers who reject Christ 
through the subtle influence of false lodge worship. 
Among the results of the past year's work was noted 
the laws forbidding the sale of tobacco to minors, 
condemning impure literature, and enforcing tem- 
perance teaching in all our common schools. As 
delegate from the N. H. Christian Association, I 
was invited to address the convention, and was re- 
ceived with much applause. A delegate was ap- 
pointed to represent the N. H. W. C. T. U. at our 
convention, to be held at East Rochester Oct. 27-8-9. 
I presented to the ladies of the convention fifty cop- 
ies of the October Christidn Witneas, and two mess- 
engers were appointed to distribute them among the 
delegates. Friends in neighboring states are cor- 
dially invited to attend our annual meeting at East 
Rochester. Elder H. L. Hastings, of Boston, and 
Rev. Isaac Hyatt, a seceding Freemason of Gilford 
Village, are expected among our speakers. 

S. C. Kimball. 



CITY WORK. 



Chicago, October 2, 1885. 

Since my last report I have been working largely 
in the suburbs of this city. On Sabbath evening I 
had the pleasure of addressing a goodly number in 
the Free Methodist Church, on the south side, on 
53d street. 

I spoke somewhat at length, contrasting the re- 
ligions of the lodge and the Bible. The friends here 
are awake to the important questions of the day. 
Many of them expressed a renewed interest in our 
work. I was told that at least two Masons were 
present, and were much exercised. 

On Monday, Bro. Hillegonds, of Englewood, kindly 
accompanied me in calling on many of the pastors 
of that place. We found here, as almost every- 
where, many who thought more of keeping harmony 
in their churches, than of finding out and opposing 
popular sins. Some, however, were evidently glad 
to receive light on the subject. Rev. Elsdon, pastor 
of the Baptist church, said he would like to know 
more of our work. He will consult with the trustees 
and write us the result. We called on some friends 
and secured their subscriptions to the Cynosure. 
Mr. Grossman, who has for years been an advocate 
of our reform, kindly entertained me. 

After a good night's rest, Bro. H. and myself started 
for South Holland. Stopping at Roseland, we called 
on Rev. B. VanEss, pastor of tiie Dutch Reformed 
church at that {)lace. He assured us of his loyalty 
to the cause of light, and said his church would as- 
sist what they could to maintain it. Our next stop 
was at the home of Rev. Mr. Moerdyk, of South 
Holland, known to many readers of the Cynosure as 
an able advocate of our principles. After making 
partial arrangements for a lecture, we visRed several 
of his leading members. We found all, like their 
pastor, interested in our work. Some expressed 
their interest by subscribing for our paper. My 
visit at the home of my former classmate, Mr. E. R. 
Worrell, who is teaching school at Thornton, was 
very pleasant, and gave a new inspiration for work. 

On Wednesday evening, according to appointment, 
I met the young people of the Seconil German Bap- 
tist church here. Though the night was dark and 
rainy, there was a fair attendance. That all were 



«. 



October 8, 1886 



THE CHBISTIAN CYTTOSUBE. 



iaterested was evident from the number of questions ■ 
asked and the attention given. One question was : ' 
"If these societies are so bad, why do so many of 
your enlightened Americans belong to them ?" I 
have agreed to speak to them farther on next Wed- 
nesday evening. I 

It has been my custom when going from place to 
place to hand tracts to those whom I chance to meet. 
It is quite amusing Fometimes to see people read. \ 
"While riding in a street car, I handed a tract, de- 1 
scribing the initiation, to a lady. She read it 
through and handed it to her husband, who was 
standing in the car. The picture of rage portrayed 
in his countenance as he tore it up is seldom equall- 
ed this side the pit. 

Another gentleman, supposing, as he expressed it, 
that the tracts "were good Sunday tracts," said he 
did not care for any, but when I asked "if he had 
had traveled east," "Oh yes," said he, and immedi- 
ately wanted one. W. B. Stoddard. 

Dr. Ezra Hunt says: "The dire effect of beerdrinki 
ing is attracting the attention of the German Govern- 
ment, and the resulting race deterioration is making 
itself felt. Within two years the government has 
been seriously perplexed to know what to do with 
its two thousand tramps and vagabonds." 



CORRESPrNDENCE. 



DANES COMING INTO LINE WITH SWEDES. 



Clinton, Iowa. 
Editor Christian CyNOSURE : — The Danish 
Evangelical Lutheran church in America is a 
small sj'Uod with only thirty-six ministers 
and about 120 congregations, in thirteen states, but 
it is growing fast 3'ear by year. In the Danish col- 
ony in Lincoln county, Minn., more than a hundred 
families have purchased land this summer, and it is 
intended to start more colonies as soon as possible. 
Many members of the Danish congregations are 
members also of secret societies, in particular of a 
society called "The Danish Brotherhood ;" but the 
feeling against such societies is getting strong in 
the Danish church. The convention last j-ear re- 
quired "The Danish Brotherhood" to give up the 
oath, the secrecy, the Christ-excluding religion and 
the blasphemous use of the Lord's prayer in the 
name of the pagan society; but all in vain. After 
that time discussion and controversy has been car- 
ried on in the Danish papers and congregations. 
The convention this year in Neenah, Wis. (Sept. 18th 
and following), discussed the question : What shall 
we do to prevent the secret societies from seizing our 
churches ? The time is not ripe yet for exclusion 
of the secret society members, but the ministers and 
delegates unanimously gave their votes for this res- 
olution : 

The convention regards the spirit of the secret societies as a 
spirit from the devil. As Christians and children of light we 
pledge ourselves to combat this spirit and warn against the self- 
made, Uhrist-denying religion of these societies." 

The agents of N. C. A. undoubtedly will be wel- 
comed in all the Danish churches. 

F. L. Grimdtvig. 



have anything to do with the G. A. R. He is called 
a crank, and lives quite a retired life on a farm near 
Concordia, and receives a pension. He never hesi- 
tates to speak out against secretism. A few years 
ago, while at a soldier's reunion in Topeka, he was 
called out for a speech amidst great cheering. The 
speaker preceeding him had said, that the next war 
in this country would be against Romanism. Mr. 
Corbett went on to say that there was more danger 
of a war on the secret society question. But the 
chairman soon called him down, sa3ing they had no 
time to listen to crankism. I think Bro. Corbett 
could easily be enlisted in the anti-secret woi'k, and 
would make an earnest and efficient speaker. 

There is one Cynosure subscriber in Beloit, a no- 
ble anti-secret worker, Mrs. L. T. McKune. Her 
doors are open to every weary reform pilgrim. For 
several years she has held up the banner alone in this 
town, where the lodges seem to control everything — 
where a reformer would be arrested for speaking on 
the street, while a vender of patent medicine or a 
politician could speak undisturbed. Sister McKune 
ventured sometime ago to enquire through the Cy- 
nosure about a colored minister, Bro. Suggs, who 
had been arrested on a false charge, because, as was 
supposed, he was speaking against Masonry. Her 
note in the Cynosure came under the eye of the edit- 
or of the Beloit Courier which was a signal for a 
severe attack upon her and the cause. 

I have lectures arranged for more than two weeks 
in the vicinity of Beloit and Concordia. The com- 
munities to which I find the easiest access, are the 
United Presbyterian, Wesleyan Methodist, United 
Brethren, and Covenanter. They are usually to be 
found in the rural districts, on account of the un- 
popular truth they advocate. But it is important to 
cultivate these fields, because only one-fifth of our 
population live in cities, and the day is coming when 
the country boys must take care of the city boys. 

M. A. Gault. 



MR. HASTINGS AND THE GOOD TEMPLARS. 



WAT SIDE NOTES. 



BOSTON CORBETT ON THE LODGE. 

Beloit, Kan., Sept. 28, 1885. 

Editor Cynosure. — During the last two weeks I 
have preached on National Reform from the pulpits 
of Bros. J. R. Latimer and J. M. McKitrick, near 
Idana, Clay county, Kansas, and Bros. S. M. Steven- 
son and W. i. Brookes. Each of these pastors is 
right on the anti-secret, as well as on the National 
Reform issue, and kindly arranged for me to lecture 
as well as preach several evenings in the bounds of 
their congregations. All these points were in the 
country except Bro. Brookes's church in Miltonvale, 
where I held three meetings. With a full-orbed 
moon and dry roads we had fine audiences. They 
were mostly the old reliable United Presbyterians 
and Covenanters. They were prepared to take down 
anti-secretism in large doses. At most of these 
meetings I tried to show how secret lodges obstruct- 
ed temperance and other moral legislation, giving il- 
lustrations that came under my own observation. 

Last Thursday, while in Concordia, I was intro- 
duced to Boston Corbett, who was a sergeant during 
the war in the 16th New York cavalry, and acquired 
a national reputation by shooting J. Wilkes Booth, 
in Garrett's barn, near Bowling Green, Va. The 
sergeant is a small, active man of fine soldiery bear- 
ing, and, I am glad to say, a devoted Christian. He 
is an interesting speaker, and sometimes preaches 
in the Methodist church. He is strongly opposed 
to secret societies, and refuses for this reason to 



Wheaton College, Sept. 24, 1885. 

Dear Cynosure: — The cool, unimpassioned list- 
ener in the pew is quite as apt to know the exact 
weight and emphasis of the words of the impas 
sioned orator, as he himself is. The reference of 
Mr. Hastings to the pope was made in no such apol- 
ogetic way as he would have people think, but in 
glowing eulogy, both of Mr. Finch and of the order 
of which he is the head. If it meant anything, it 
meant that the striking resemblance between that or- 
der and its head, and the church of Rome and its 
head, was in some way creditable to the order. 
Now, if it- be true that the Papacy is the great apos- 
tasy, is it not true that this one feature of it, so dis- 
tinctly foreshadowed in Scripture, that in all the 
world it has but one head that raises itself "above 
all that is called God and worshiped," is the most 
evident token of the same, and the one given by 
which we should know that apostasy when it made 
its appearance? If this be so, may we not fairly 
conclude that whatever movement appears among 
men that has, or claims to have, this one striking 
feature, has, or, claims to have, the token that most 
clearly marks it as a part of the great apostasy ? It 
is well known that such is the claim of Freemason- 
ry, and the last hatched of its multitudinous brood. 

This is not the onlj' indication that the secret or- 
ders are a part of the anti-Christ predicted in Scrip- 
ture. The careful student will find many of them. 
Indeed, one need not look farther than Mr. Hastings's 
article to find one, at least. He speaks of the "al- 
tar" of the Good Templars' lodge. Now, an altar is 
a part of a religion. It had an outward form and 
an outward use in the Jewish church, to wit, for sac- 
rificial use. In the spiritual church it has no out- 
ward form nor outward use, and the fact that the 
Romish church I'etains it is another evidence that 
she is part, at least, of the great apostasy. That 
Freemasonry and the secret orders retain it whether 
in outward form or in spiritual significance clearly 
marks them as anti-Christian. 

I submit that the cases of the lodge and the 
church supposed are onl3' apparently, and not really 
parallel; for the church members, if approached on 
the subject, would, if they were honest, admit they 
were wrong and ought to repent; if they did not they 
would not deserve to be, and would not be regarded 
as Christians; but Good Templars, in the case of 
the county organization referred in New York (and I 
was told that the same was true in Chicago, while on 
my waj' to Lake Bluff, bj^ a speaking member of the 
order there, and the same is known to be true in 
many other places), will not, at least in these places, 
even so much as allow what we are told is one of 
their two fundamental principles to be discussed in 
their meetings. If "by their fruits ye shall know 
them" is a good rule to judge b}^, and if prohibi- 



tion is good fruit, the Good Templar tree cannot be 
a very good tree; thus far it has i^roduced more crab 
apples than pippins. Furthermore much of the 
good fruit that it appears to bring forth is not its 
own, as in the case of the writer himself, who, I un- 
derstand, was a prohibitionist before he was a Good 
Templar. 

The criticism of the order was only such as the 
circumstances seemed to call for, and did not at all 
state the worst objections to it. 

When Freemasonry, in that act revealing another 
striking feature of the great, persecuting anti-Christ 
of Rome, struck down the life of a citizen of the 
Empire State, and caused its members, many of 
whom were professed Christians and ministers, to 
perjure themselves to shield the criminals who were 
its tools to do the deed, the excitement that arose 
caused 45,000 out of 50,000 to leave their lodges in 
the North, and caused most of the lodges to die; 
but slavery, a twin institution of despotism in the 
South did not allow free discussion, and hence saved 
its life there. 

After a new generation came on the stage, the ef- 
fort began to call back to life this power in the State 
that assumed the prerogative of the State. For this 
purpose the Odd-fellows were organized by Freema- 
sons, and then the principles of temperance becom- 
ing popular, to rehabilitate still more rapidly Free- 
masonry in the public confidence, advantage was 
taken of this popularity to reorganize the temper- 
ance cause under forms of secrecy more or less Ma- 
sonic, and thus destroy the aversion to secrecy that 
was still in the public mind, charmed with the work- 
ing of this new device of the adversary, enthusias- 
tic Masons sometimes called these new stepping 
stones to their order the Sundaj' schools of the 
lodge. 

Right well they performed their mission. Those 
lecturers went forth, many of them, with more zeal 
to promote "our order" than the temperance cause. 
One of them, upon a summons of the master of the 
Masonic lodge in our town, organized a lodge to try 
to break down the rule in Wheaton College against 
students attending lodge meetings in term time. 
He gave out notices of his meetings that some of 
the lodge minnions had the impudence to post in the 
College hall, and said publicly, "Let the students 
come and join us, and if the College dares to deal 
with them, we will publish them to the ends of the 
earth, and thej' will have to shut their doors," — a 
threat which they proceeded to put into execution, 
publishing everything but the truth about the case. 
When the College suspended three of its number 
who were thus caused to rebel against its rightful 
authorit}', a mandamus was sued out, seeking to com- 
pel them to take back their contumacious students. 
The College was put to the expense of defending it- 
self in the circuit and in the supreme courts, in both 
of which its course was entirely vindicated. 

At one time a large majority of the A'oting mem- 
bers of this lodge voted for license. 

In the villages and country places there was not 
material enough to run the open and the secret or- 
ganizations, and in the larger places manj^ of the 
workers were swept along in the current into the 
new order of things, thus discouraging and killing 
off the old open societies. In far the larger portion 
of the country these new orders soon died out, but 
in the villages and cities stealthily like a pestilence 
the Masonic or Odd-fellows lodge came in their 
place. 

While I concede to my brother Hastings all hon- 
esty of purpose, and all he claims of success for his 
personal labors for the cause of temperance, I still 
do not think that they prove the Templars to be a 
good institution. Honest efforts to promote a good 
cause will promote that cause, however much the per- 
son putting them forth maj^ be in error in other mat- 
ters. And the fact that so good a man does not see 
anything wrong in the order only proves that if one 
wants to see what is in a meal bag he ought not to 
put his head in it, and perhaps furnishes another 
example of the truth of that Scripture which sa^'s, 
"How can ye believe that receive honor one of anoth- 
er, and seek not the honor that comes from God 
only." 

I have given you one example, which might be 
multiplied indefinitelj', of the persecuting power of 
Masonry, which is one of the ear-marks of anti- 
Christ. I could give manj^, showmg that the secret 
temperance orders are not destitute of the same. I 
will' only refer to one — the murderous mob that 
sought to kill President C. A. Blanchard in Vine- 
land, N. J ., because he depicted the moral dangers 
made possible by promiscuous night meetings of the 
sexes under the peculiar conditions oflered by the 
lodge. In less than a year the very evil depicted 
happened to that community, and the head of the 
lodge was the offender. 



jSB 



THE CmilBOTAK CYKOatTB^. 



October 8, 1885 



In one respect Bro. Hastings is fai" in advance of 
members of tlie secret ordei-s. as I have found them. 
He does not feel under obligation to defend the 
whole mongrel pack of secret lodges, oniers, cam'ps 
and vfhatever else they may call themselves. If he 
really believes some of them wrong, and sets him- 
self to oppose them, perhaps he may see the weak- 
ness and inconsistency of his position. 

Men to be permanently i-eformed and benefited 
must have new hearts, but he whose sole prerogative 
it is to give them. said, -in secret have I said noth- 
ing. 0. F. LrMuy. 



JS WE TT, HASTINGS, SECBECT. 



relation to Christ Jesus, "there is none other name un- 
der heaven given among men. whereby we must be 
saved?" R. W. Lyman. 



TEB WARRING OF THE ELEMENTS IN SOUTH- 
WESTERN MISSOURI. 



Arcade. X. Y. 
Experience has its v;ilue as an instructor. Hav- 
ing been in its school for nearly seventy-six years, 
and in the school of Christ as an earnest and willing 
pupil for about sixty-two and a half years, I am de- 
sirous to impart for the benefit of my fellows, and 
to the end that God may be glorified. In the Ci/no- 
sttre for Sept. 2-lth may be seen a quotation from the 
writings of Chiirles Jewett. and in the same paper a 
communication from Samuel D. Hastings. These 
men seem, both of them, to be Christian in character 
and in profession: candid and honest in the presen- 
tation of their views. One opposes, the other favors 
close organization. With all due deference. I maj- 
say that 3Ir. Jewett was not working consistently 
with his own ideas of what was for the best, when he 
worked --for years with and for Sous of Temperance 
and Good Templars.'" --believing"' at the time as he 
says, '-all the while, that open societies would serve 
ourpur{X)se better." 

As I was a humble co-worker in the war against 
alcohol before IS-iO, I can. from my own personal 
obser\'ation. corroborate the testimony that Mr. Jew- 
ett gives, that --unbrotherly strifes for offices and 
honors, were unknown in the open organizations, ah- 
solutely unknown." 

Suffer personal allusions, as I desire that others 
may be profited in view of my experience. I think 
it was in New York city, and by eight Freemasons 
and eight Odd-fellows, that the order of the Sons of 
Temperance was begotten many years since. There 
is a significance in the composition of this father- 
hood which it is well we should study in the light of 
of the aphorism --Like father, like son." i think 
it was within ten days of birth of this child that I 
was solicited to become a co-heir or rather a co-pecu- 
niary contributor of myself and purse, the latter be- 
ing the most desired. I did not then know of the 
character of its parentage, but as I was a Christian 
I searched to find if m}- Master was at its head. Not 
finding him there, I declined to enlist. 

Years after, I think it was about the year 1846 or 
a little later, and while residing at Cuba, in this 
State. I was surrounded by circumstances somewhat 
as were those of m}- brother Hastings, at Geneva, 
"Wis., except that I think it very likely that the ur- 
gency of my joining was stronger than his. These 
were the circumstances. I was living in the very 
center of the village and was one of a very few pro- 
nounced temperance men; I had in charge the post- 
office of the place and was, of course, well known. 
Two public lirjuor houses stood verj' near the post- 
office, from the bars of which liquor flowed rampant- 
ly. There came a time when, in one of the barrooms, 
some dozen or so drinkers were together when one 
of their number dared the others to join him in shut- 
ting down the gate against all intoxicants. His com- 
panions all of them accepted the challenge and the 
alcohol family was banished from their homes. 

Then there arose among them a demand for a so- 
ciety of the Sons of Temperance. Knowing me to 
be a temperance man, they applied to me to lead off 
in a move to establish an order. Here was a tem[>- 
tation to coraph' for the sake of saving these men 
and gathering others as brands from the burning. I 
halted and reconsidered my former decision and de- 
termined that, for the sake of saving these men and 
others, I would, could I upon review see it to be 
right, procede to help organize. I examined the con- 
stitution, looked up to the hills from whence wisdom 
and direction must come from him who sittcth in the 
heavens. The result was that I found no precedent, 
no sanction and no permit whatever, either from the 
Spirit or the Word, to operate through or by any 
such-like, sought-out human invention. 

Had my brother Hastings, when between two 
opinions as to joining, sought out and yjcen governed 
hy the fxnrap^eondteo.chinga of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ, and the whole force and genius of an 
open Gospel, I hesitate not to affirm that he would 
have done as T did, decline \X) ignore Chnst'is plan of 
operation whi'-h was open to the world. Trappings, 
gewgaws, high sounding and grand titles illy become 
the followers of the meek and lowly Jesus. 

When will men, especially Chri-stians, learn that in 



Dapeville, Mo. 

Dear Cvnosi're: — If you please let it be remem- 
bered, that in February last, when Bro. Richards of 
Ft. Scott, lectured in our village against the lodge, 
the Cumberland Presbyterian minister, who is a Ma- 
son, was induced to attend the lecture, and was so 
affected by the power of truth that he was the sub- 
ject of general remark, for perhaps some weeks there- 
after. But, alas! in this, as in innumerable simi- 
lar instances, the evil spirit, after wandering hith- 
er and thither, returns to his house, at once re-en- 
ters and holds undisputed possession. 

At the close of the above lecture, Bro. Richards 
approached this preacher, and, in his affectionate 
manner, putting his arm around him, said, "I hope 

I have not offended you, Bro, R , in my plain 

presentation of the truth, to-night. God knows I 
love you, and I want you to pray for me." "Whj' 
no, Bro. Richards," responded the convulsed man, 
■'I love you, and want you to pray for me." This 
occurred on the 2nd of February last, in Dadeville, 
Mo. But, lo! upon these very same streets, this 
same man, a short time since, is driven to such a 
state of desperation, simply by the truth being 
brought to bear upon his exceedingly inconsistent 
position, that he exclaims aloud, that that man 
Richards, in his lecture upon the occasion referred 
to, said and uttered things that he knew to be false 
when he stated them; forgetting evidently that he, 
at that very time, endorsed him as a brother beloved ! 

But I have only revealed one-half of this heart- 
sickening picture. This same poor man, preacher 
and all as he is, went on to publicly declare that 
Freemasonry laid no claims to be a system of relig- 
ion in any senseof the word, whatsoever. But unfor- 
tunate for him again, within a very short time in- 
deed, after the above denunciations, a notoriously 
wicked Mason in our town is called to lie down and 
die. Without the least sign of repentance, whatev- 
er, but with execration almost to the latest breath, ho 
passes into eternity. Now, what are the facts in tiie 
case? Simply, the Masons, as is their custom, with 
a good minister of the Christian order, at their head, 
proceed to bury their deceased brother. This they 
do in the most public and unequivocal manner. 
They send him direct from the lodge below, to "the 
Grand Lodge above," the declarations and denuncia- 
tions of our good brother minister to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

Now, look at it, one professed minister of Jesus 
Christ denies in to to all religious claims or preten- 
sions of the order, and that, too, in the very face of 
the best accredited authors of which they boast; 
while another, better established I presume, comes 
out boldly, sustains his order and publicly officiates 
in the very rites which his fellow minister, only a 
few weeks before, had so emphatically denied. 
Which is a perishing world to believe? 

This last minister the very next day after the fu- 
neral, gravely ascends his pulpit, and declares 
that "There is none other name under heaven, given 
among men, whereby we must be saved," except that 
of Jesus Christ. But only yesterday this name was 
entirely ignored. What are we to do, I ask, under 
such a state of things? What is to be the result of 
such teaching? Is it strange that infidelity and all 
sorts of skepticism are emboldened to come to the 
front? Were it not that there is a Power greater 
than man, the truly pious heart must faint. But, 
thank God, these things have an end. Error will 
not always triumph. One grand, good effect is al- 
ready being realized; that is a duped people are be- 
ginning to think, examine, and MOVE. Every thing 
has its effect. May God hasten the day when the 
people will be disenthralled; truth triumph, and our 
blessed Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ be fully en- 
throned. Bro. Love, of (Jsceola, Mo., gave us, re- 
cently, two telling lectures against the lodge. 
Yours for the war, J. W. Thojii'son. 



BIBLE LESSONS. 



tcrprises. vs. 15-17. Jehu, as the sequel shows, was ac- 
tuated by that unhallowed zeal which seeks to make re- 
ligion a stepping-stone for its own selflih ambition. His 
greeting to Jehouodab is a proof of his self-righteous 
spirit. True piety is humble and more conscious of its 
failings and shortcomings than of its own goodness. Jehu 
plainly went beyond his commission. He had received no 
command to kill the king of Judah or to murder forty 
and two of )iis near relatives in cold blood, and the terri- 
ble completeness with which he did the work of exter- 
minating the idolotrous house of Ahab was less from 
righteous indignation at the abominations they practiced 
than the fear and hatred which a usurper would naturally 
feel towards the dethroned dynasty. But Jehu is only 
the representation of a large class who serve themselves 
and imagine they are serving God. There was never a 
popular evil, or an unholy traffic in vice which has not in 
some way sought, and too often gained, the sanction of 
the church. Every form of sin, even to miTrder and 
adultery, could be freely practiced in the Middle Ages by 
the payment of a certain sum of money into the papal 
coffers. Bad men always find a Jehonodab to approve 
their iniquities. The saloon in our own day tries to shield 
itself behind a few isolated Bible texts, and Masonry 
points to lodge ministers as a proof that it is a good thing, 
when in reality it only proves that the church is in a ter- 
rible state of delusion. If the Bible, instead of the con- 
duct or opinions of men, however exalted their standing 
in the church or the community, had always been the au- 
thority by which to judge the right or wrong of an insti- 
tution or a custom, much sin and misery might have been 
saved the world. 

2. Men may destroy Baal in one form, only to worship 
him in another, vs. 18-33. The very man who by a hy- 
pocritical stratagem compasses the wholesale destruction 
of the priests of Baal, himself rears again the golden 
calves of Jeroboam!— Baal worship in another form, less 
outwardly gross, but still Baal ■s^orship. The strongest 
test by which a reformer can try the purity of his zeal is 
by the simple question. Do I hate all evil? That is a 
spurious reform which would banish one form of sin 
from the land while it harbors and defends another. Pro- 
hibitionists who are for destroying the saloon while they 
court the lodge commit a fatal mistake. Baal has many 
forms. To destroy him in one may only be, like Jehu, to 
enthrone him in another. 

LIGHT FROM THE WORD. 

What is a characteristic of true piety? 1 Cor. 13: 4. 1. 
c. Must national, like individual, reform be thorough to 
win God's approval? 1 Sam. 15: 22. 



FOURTH QUARTER. 

STUDIES IN THE KINGS AND PROPHETS. 
LESSON III. Oct. 18, 1885.— Jehu's false zeal. 3 Kings 10: 
1.5-31. 

GOLDEN TEXT.— Blessed is the man that walketh not in the 
counsel of the ungodly. Ps. 1 : 1. 
\()jjen the Bible ini/1 read the lessmi.] 

COMMENTS ON THE LESSON BY E. E. FLAGG. 
1. Unprincipled and arntntious men are always easier to 
gain the mnction of Qod'g people in their plans and en- 



Jehu was a great soldier, a man of intense energy, of 
quick wit, of positive opinions, and decisive action. 
But he was cruel, impulsive, treacherous, ambitious, 
unscrupulous, boastful, and self seeking. "It is the driv- 
ing of Jehu, for he driveth furiously;" this is the best 
memorial that will remain of him who has let his zeal 
become his master when it was meant to be his servant, 
and who has counted it a pleasure instead of a hard ne- 
cessity to destroy. —Maurice. He is exactly one of those 
men whom we are compelled to recognize, not for what 
is good or great in themselves, but as instruments for de 
stroying evil and preparing the way for good, such as 
Augustus Ca'sar at liome. Sultan Mahmoud 11. in Tur- 
key. He showed inscrutable secrecy and reserve in car- 
rying out his plans; a union of cold, remorseless tenacity 
with occasional bursts of furious, wayward, almost fanat- 
ical zeal. — Stanley. 

''Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam . . . Jehu depart- 
ed not." He was brought up under the worship of the 
golden calves, so that this did not seem so evil in his 
eyes. For this worship, see 1 Kings 12: 20-33, Lesson 
n.. Third Quar. And as this worship was really the wor- 
ship of Jehovah, though in an unlawful manner, Jehu 
probably did not feel the same obligation to suppress it 
that he had felt to destroy the worship of Baal. Besides, 
there were political reasons for preserving the worship 
established by Jeroboam which Jehu felt that he could 
not disregard. This worship kept the people from going 
to Jerusalem to worship and therefore was a means of 
keeping the kingdoms of Israel and Judah separate. — 
Todd. He had religious feeling enough and patriotism 
enough to detest the utterly debasing Astarte worship; 
but the pure worship of Jehovah was altogether beyond 
and above him. — Cook. 

The Good Elements in Jeuu's Zeal. (1) Tt was 
right to have zeal. (2) It accomplished a good work for 
God's kingdom. (3) It was patriotic, anil saved his coun- 
try. (4) It was intense. (5) It was effective, and led 
to decisive and energetic measures. (6) It received tem- 
poral success and temporal rewards. 

The Bad Elements in Jehu's Zeal. (1) It was 
selfish, and not for God. (2) It was cruel. (3) It was 
boastful and proud. (4) It was partial, doing that which 
was agreeable and for his advantage, but not the whole 
will of God. (5) It employed bad methods, falsehood, 
hypocrisy, treachery, in accomplishing its ends. (6) It 
was negative, destroying the evil, but not building up the 
good. (7) It did not grow out of a sincere heart devoted 
to God aud the good of his fellow-men. (8) It failed of 
true spiritual success and vevienA..— Peloubet, 



October 8, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



ANTI-MA80NIG L^GTUMEMS. 

General Agent and Lectubek, J. P. 
Stoddard, 231 West Madison street, Chi- 
cago. 

H. H. Hinman, Willimantic, Conn. 
State Agents. 

Illinois, Geo. T. Dissette, Cynosure of- 
fice. 

Indiana, 8. L. Cook of Albion 

Mich., A. H. Springstein, Warren. 

Missouri, M. N. Butler, Burlington June. 

Minn., J. P. Richards, care Prof. Paine, 
Wasioja. 

New York, W. B. Stoddard, Dale. 

Wisconsin, Isaac Bancroft, Monroe 

Kansas, Robert Loggan, Clifton. 

Degree Workers. — [Seceders."] 
J. K. Glassford, Carthage, Mo. 

D. P. Rathbun, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Other Lecturers. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
N. Callender, Thompson, Pa. 
J H. Tlmmons, Tarentum, Pa 
■ J. H. Balrd, Templeton, Pa. 
T. B. McCormick, Princeton, Ind. 

E. Johnson, Dayton, Ind. 

H. A. Day, Williamstown, Mich. 
J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 
A. Mayn, Bloomington, Ind. 
J. B. Cressinger, Sullivan, O. 
W. M. Love, Osceola, Mo. 
A. D.Freeman, Downers Grove, 111 
E. Mathews, Spring Arbor, Mich. 
Wm. FentoT) St Paul, Minn. 
E. I. Grinnell, Blairsburg, Iowa. 
Warren Taylor, South Salem, O. 
J. 8. Perry, Thompson, Conn. 

C. F. Hawley, Wheaton, 111. 

J. T. Michael, New Wilmington, Pa. 

8. C. Kimball, New Market, N. H. 

8. G. Barton, Breckinridge, Mo. 

Joel H. Austin, Goshen, Ind. 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

E. BarnetBon, Jackson Valley, Pa. 

Wm. R. Roach, Pickering, Ont. 

D. A. Richardp, Brighton, Mich. 

R. J. Williams, Winnebago City, Minn. 



A Wonderful Woman, 

A Wonderful Life, 

AND 

A Wonderful Book. 

Laura S. Haviland is a quiet, gentle, 
unassuming Quaker woman, 76 years of 
age, yet vigorous, w^o has had a remark- 
able career of usefui.iess, and has now 
given to the world a remarkable history 
of her "Life Work" as a teacher, at an 
early day, of the colored refugees in 
Canada and in Michigan, and in other 
States, as a traveler down South in the 
guise of a "berry picker," helping out 
into freedom many slaves; as a nurse and 
preacher to the sufferers in hospitals dur- 
ing the war; and with Gov. St. John and 
Flizabeth Comstock, relieving the desti- 
tute and suffering refugees in Kansas, 
etc. 

Her book is neither fiction nor found- 
ed on fiction, but is an interesting narra- 
tion of facts of a most thrilling charac- 
ter, as every one will find and testify who 
will get and read her book, now on sale 
at the Cynosure office, 231 W. Madison 
St., Chicago, HI. Price, cloth, $1,75; 
half Russia, $3.35. 

A WOMAN'S VICTORY; 

OR 

THE QUERY OP THE LODGEVILLE 
CHURCH 



BY JENNIE li. HARDIH. 

This simple and touching story which 
was lately published in the Cyno- 
sure is now ready for orders in a beautiful 
pamphlet. It is worth reading by every 
Anti-mason —and especially by his wife. 
Get it and take it home to cheer the heart 
of your companion who may desire to do 
something for Christ against great evils, 
but is discouraged from making any pub- 
lic effort. Price, fifteen cents. Ten 
for a doUar 



The American Party. 



First Nomination for President at Oberlin, 
Ohio, May 23, 187;i. 

Platform Adopted at Chicago, June 38, 
1873. 

Name Adopted at Syracuse, N. Y., June 3, 
1874. 

PRESIDENTAL CANDIDATES : 

1872— Charles Francis Adams and Joseph L. 
Barlow. 

1876— James B. Walker and Donald Kirkpat- 
rick. 

1880— J. W. Phelps and Samuel C. Pomeroy. 

1884— J. Blanchard and J. W. Conant nomi- 
nated; the former withdrawing, Samuel C. 
Pomeroy was nominated. Both nominees with- 
drawing, the support of the party was generally 
given to John P. St. John and William Daniel, 
candidates of the Prohibition party. 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

i''. W. Capwell, New York ; J. A. Oonmit Con- 
necticut; 2S. O. Paine, Minnesota; O. W. Nee- 
dels, Missouri; E. D. Bailey, District of Colum- 
bia {Sx. Com ) James Kennedy, California; 
Robert Hardie, Dakota; J. F. Galloway, Flori- 
da; L. N. Straiten, Illinois; Israel Hess, Indi- 
ana; J. N. Norris. Iowa; H. Curtis, Kansas, S. 
A. Pratt, Massachusetts ; H. A. Day, Michigan ; 
E. Tapley, Mississippi; S. C. Kimball, New 
Hampshire; Robert Armstrong, New Jersey; 
E. A. Foldstrom, Nebraska; J. M. Scott, Ohio; 
Wm. H. Pruett, Oregon; A. M, PauU, Rhode 
Island; J. W. Moss, West Virginia; M. R. Brit- 
ten, Wisconsin. 

AMERICAN PLATFORM. 



ADOPTED AT CHICAGO, JUNE 30, 1884. 

Viewing with deep concern the corrupt and 
unsettled condition of American politics, and 
witnessing with alarm the fearful prevalence of 
caste and clannishness by which our citizens 
are being arrayed in hostile bands, working se- 
cretly to compass political ends, a method di- 
rectly and powerfully tending to increase cor- 
ruption, to destroy mutual confidence, and 
hasten disruption and bloodshed ; and having 
no hope of adequate remedy for these evils 
from existing parties, and believing the foun- 
dation of a party based upon the fundamental 
principles of the Declaration of American In- 
dependence, both inevitable and indispensable : 

We, therefore, a portion of the American 
people, believing with our fathers that we have 
our rights and liberties, not from men or par- 
ties, but from God ; believing in the Christian 
marriage, and not in Mormonism ; believing in 
the religious democracy of the New Testament, 
and not in the despotism of the lodge ; believ- 
ing, also, with our Scotch and English ancest- 
ors, that civil government, though ordained in 
God, is "founded in nature, not in grace," and, 
therefore, that all have equal civil rights ; while 
we abhor the idea of enforcing religion or con- 
trolling conscience by human laws and penal- 
ties as calculated to make hypocrites, not 
Christians, and savoring of the days of priest- 
ism, the fagot and the stake, we at the same 
time as firmly believe that atheism and priest- 
craft are twins and both alike foes to human 
liberty and welfare. We further most firmly 
believe that a government without God has 
none but lynch power, and is destitute of all 
legitimate authority to maintain civil order, to 
swear a witness, to try a criminal, to hang a 
murderer, to imprison a thief; and while we 
consider government without God as a mere 
usurpation, we regard all religions and wor- 
ships Invented by men, and so having no high- 
er than human origin, as mere swindling impo- 
sitions and cheats. We believe in peace and in 
national arbitration as a means of perpetuating 
it; yet we as profoundly believe that the 
bravery and blood of our soldiers have bought 
us the peace which we enjoy, and we honor 
the memories of the dead and will be just to 
the claims of the living; and we take up and 
prolong the strain raised by the women of this 
country: "For God, and home, and native 
land," and trust that this beautiful and patri- 
otic motto will soon be not only echoed by their 
voices, but sustained by their votes. 

We, therefore, solemnly adopt and present 
the following, as containing a brief synopsis of 
the principles of our government, by which we 
intend to be governed in casting our votes. We 
hold: 

1. That ours is a Christian and not a heathen 
nation, and that the God of the Christian Scrip- 
tures is the author of civil government. 

2. That the Bible should be associated with 
books of science and literature in all our edu- 
cational institutions. 

3. That God requires, and man needs a Sab- 
bath. 

4. We demand the prohibition of the impor- 
tation, manufacture, and sale of intoxicating 
drinks. 

5. We hold that the charters of all secret 
lodges granted by our Federal and State Legis- 
latures should be withdrawn, and their oaths 
prohibited by law. 

6. We are opposed to putting prison labor or 
depreciated contract labor from foreign coun- 
tries in competition with free labor to benefit 
manufacturers, corporations or speculators. 

7. We are in favor of a revision and enforce- 
ment of the laws concerning patents and inven- 
tions; for the prevention and punishment of 
frauds either upon inventors or the general 
public. 

8. We hold to and will vote for woman suf- 
frage. 

9. That the civil equality secured to all 
American citizens by Articles 13, 14 and 15 of 
our amended National Constitution should be 
preserved inviolate, and the same equality 
should be extended to Indians and Chinamen. 

10. That international differences should be 
settled by arbitration. 

11. That land and other monopolies should 
be discouraged. 

12. That the general government should fur- 
nish the peopla with s,n umpl* cod cound cur- 
rency. 



13. That it should be the settled policy of the 
government to reduce tarifEs and taxes as rap- 
idly as the necessities of revenue and vested 
business interests will allow. 

14. That polygamy should be immediately 
suppressed by law, and that the Republican 
party is censurable for the long neglect of its 
duty in respect to this evil. 

15. And, finally, we demand for the Ameri- 
can people the abolition of electoral colleges, 
and a direct vote for President and Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States. 



THE CHURCHES VS. LOD^^RY. 

The following denominations are com- 
mitted by vote of their legislative assem- 
blies or by constitution to a separation 
from secret lodge worship: 

Adventists (Seventh-day.) 

Baptists — Primitive, Seventh-day and 
Scandinavian. 

Brethren (Dunkers or German Bap- 
tists.) 

Christian Reformed Church. 

Church of God ^Northern Indiana El- 
dership.) 

Congregational — The State Associations 
of Illinois and Iowa have adopted resolu- 
tions against the lodge. 

Disciples (in part.) 

Friends. 

Lutherans — Norwegian, Danish, Swed- 
ish and Synodical Conferences. 

Mennonites. 

Methodists — Free and Wesleyan. 

Methodist Protestant (Minnesota Con 
ference.) 

Moravians. 

Plymouth Brethren. 

Presbyterian — AssDciate, Reformed and 
United. 

Reformed Church (Holland Branch.) 

United Brethren in Christ. 

Individual churches in some of these 
denominations should be excepted, in part 
of them even a considerable portion. 

The following local churches have, as a 
pledge to disfellowship and oppose lodge 
worship, given their names to the follow- 
ing list as 

THE associated CHURCHES OF CHEIST. 

New Ruhamah Cong. Hamilton, Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Cong. Sandford Co. Ala. 

New Hope Methodist, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Congregational, College Springs, Iowa. 

College Church of Christ, Wheaton, 111. 

First Congregational, I,.eland, Mich. 

Sugar Grove Church, Green county. Pa. 

Military Chapel, M. E., Lowndes county, 
Miss. 

Hopewell Missionary Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Cedar Grove Miss. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Simon's Chapel, M. E., Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Misa. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Vliss. 

Brownlee Church, Caledonia, Miss. 

Salem Church, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

West Preston Baptist Church, Wayne Co., Pa, 

OTHER LOCAL CHURCHES 

adopting the same principle are — 

Baptist churches : N. Abington, Pa. ; Meno- 
monie, Mondovi, Waubeck and Spring Prairie, 
Wis.; Wheaton, lU. ; Perry, N. Y. ; Spring 
Creek, near Burlington, Iowa ; Lima, Ind. ; 
ConstableviUe, N. Y. The "Good WiU Associ- 
ton" of Mobile, Ala., comprising some twenty- 
five colored Baptist churches; Bridgewater 
Baptist Association, Pa. ; Old Tebo Baptist, 
near Leesville, Henry Co., Mo. ; Hoopeston, 111 ; 
Esmen, lU. ; Strykersville, N. Y. 

Congregational churches : 1st of Oberlin, O. ; 
Tonica, Crystal Lake, Union and Big Woods, 
lU. ; Solsbury, Ind. ; Cfongregational Methodist 
Maplewood, Mass. 

Independent churches In Lowell, Country- 
man school house near Linden wood, Marengo 
and Streator, lU. ; Berea and Camp Nelson, Ky ; 
Ustick, 111. ; Clarksburg, Kansas ; State Associ- 
ation of Ministers and Churches of Christ in 
Kentuckv. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS 

Who depend on voluntary contributions 
of Christian people in whole or in part 
for their support: 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

Eli Tapley, Columbus, Miss. 

J. F. Galloway, Okahumka Florida. 

Wm. Hazenburg, Cape Tovra, S. 
Africa. 

A. D. Zaraphonithes, Andros, Greece. 

C. B. Ward, Secunderabad, India. 

The Evangelists associated with Rev. 
John G. Fee, of Berea, Ky. 

Contributions for either of these breth 
ren may be forwarded through the Treas- 
urer of the N. C. A. Please designate 
to which one such funds shall be sent. 



|@-Reader8 ordering goods, or making 
Smqmriea concerning articles advertised 
la this paper, will confer a favor by stat- 
ing that they 8»w the advertisement in 
Ibe CSRIBTIAN OTNOaUBS. 




N. C. A. BUILDING AND OFFICE OF 
THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 
331 WEST MADISON STREET, CHICAGO 



NATIONAL CHSIHTIAN ASSOCIATION 

President.— F. W. Capwell, Dale, N. Y. 

Vice-president— Rev. W. T. Meloy, 
D.D., Chicago. 

Rec. Sec'y.— W. I. Phillips. 
Cor. Sec'y and Genbal Agent. — J. 
P. .Stoddard, 331 W. Madison St., Chicago. 

Treasurer.— W. I. Phillips, 231 W. 
Madison Street, Chicago. 

Directors. — Alexander Thomson, M 
R. Britten, John Gardner, J. L. Barlow, 
Joseph Travis, William Moerdyk, 0. F. 
Lumry, M. C. Ranseen. L. N. Stratton, 
Thos. H. Gault, C. A. Blanchard. 

The object of this Association is: 
"To expose, withstand and remove secret 
societies, Freemasonry in particular, and othel 
anti-Christian movements, in order to save the 
churches of Christ from being depraved, to re- 
deem the administr? *ion of justice from per- 
version, and our r^p blican government froia 
corruption." 

To carry on this work contributions are 
solicited from every friend of tne reform. 

FoKM OF Bequest. — I give and bequeath to 
the National Christian Association, incorpo- 
rated and existing under the laws of the State 

of Illinois, the sum of dollars for the 

purposes of said Association, and for which 
the receipt of its Treasurer for the time being 
*'Jall be sufficient discharge. 

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

President. — Rev. S. Collins, D. D 
Secretaries. — Rev. S. A. George. H. 
L. Kellogg and M. N. Butler. 

STATE AUXILIAKY ASSOCIATIONS 

Alabama.— Pres.jW. A. McAlphie; Sec, G 
M. EUiott; Treas., E. Fishel, all of Sehna. 

California. — Pres., L. B. Lathrop, HoUls- 
ter; Cor. Sec, Mrs. U. P. Merrill, Woodland; 
Treas., C. Ruddock, Woodland. 

Connecticut.— Pres., J. A. Conant, Willi- 
mantic; Sec, Geo. Smith, WUliman tic ; Treas., 
C. T. Collins, Windsor. 

Illinois. — Pres., Wm. H. Chandler, Dover; 
Sec, H. L. Kellogg; Treas., W. I. PhiUlps, 
Cwu>sure office. 

Indiana.— Pres., William H. Figg, Reno- 
Sec, 8. L. Cook, Albion; Treas., Benj. Ulsh 
Silver Lake. 

Iowa. — Pres., Geo. Warrington, Birming- 
ham; Ree. Sec, A. W. HaU, CoUege Springs; 
Cor. Sec, T. C. Maughlin, \Vashington; 
Treas., J. A. Laird, Wayne. 

Kansas.— Pres., J. P. Richards, Ft. Scott; 
Sec, W. W. McMiUen, Olathe; Treas., S. 
Alexander, Linden. 

Massachus TTs.— Pres., S. A. Pratt; Sec, 
Mrs. E. D. Bailey; Treas., David Manning,Sr. ; 
aU of Worcester. 

Michigan.— Pres., D. A. Richards, Brighton ; 
Sec'y, H. A. Day, WUliamstown; Treas., 
Geo. Swanson, Jr., Jackson. 

Minnesota.— Pres., E. G. Paine, Wasioja 
Cor. Sec, W. H. McChesuey, Fairmont; Rec. 
Sec'y, Thos. Hartley, Richland; Treas., Wm. 
H. Morrill, St. Charles. 

MissonBl.— Pres., C. J. Kephart, Avalon 
Treas., William Beauchamp, Avalon ; Cor. Sec. 
M. N. Butler. 

Nebraska.- Pres., S. Austin, Fairmount, 
Cor. Sec, W. S. Spooner, Kearney; Treas 
J. C. Fye. 

New Hampshire. — Pres., A. H. Lamprey, 
Laconia; Sec, S. C. Kimball, New Market; 
Treas., <-eorge Crosby, Gilford Village. 

New York.— Pres., F. W. Capwell, Dale; 
Sec'y, John Wallace, Syracuse; Treas., M. 
Merrick, Syracuse. 

Ohio.— Pres., Wm. DUlou, Dayton; Cor 
Sec, J. P. Lyt,c, Sago; Treas., J. M. Scott, 
Alexandria. ., t> 

Pennsylvania.- Pres., A. L. Post, Mon- 
trose; Cor. Oec, N. Callender, Thompson; 
Treas., W.B. Bertels^Ilkesbarre. 

Vermont.— Pres., W.R. Laird; Sec, C. W. 

Potter. „ „^ , „ ,, 

Wisconsin.— Pres., J. W. Wood, Baraboo; 

Sec, W. W. Ames, Menomonie: Treas., M. R 

Britten, Vienna. 
Wbst Virginia.— Pres., D.B. Tumey; bee, 

John Bosley, Gr<-fn . Tres. H B. Biggi s, 

Fetroleom 



Uti4 



THE CHRISTIAN CTNOStmU. 



Octobers, 1886 



The Christian Cynosure. 

Editobs. 
J. BLAXCHAHD. HENRY L. KELLOGG 

CHICASO, THITRSDAT. OCTOKEK S, 1885. 



TEE GESERAL COSVEyTIOy OF CHURCHES 
AGAiyST TEE LODGE. 

Such a convention was suggested at the last N. C. 
A. annual meeting. It was endorsed by a United 
Brethren couveution. which appointed lion. Halleok 
Flovd. Dr. L. Davis, and Rev. M. McNew a commit- 
tee to correspond with like committees, to agree: 

First, on the make up of the convention: and sec- 
ond, on the time, place and programme. Prominent 
men in the Preseyterian. Congregational, and several 
Germ;\n and Swedish churches have warmly en- 
dorsed the plan: and the editors of the WesJcyan and 
Fne Mtthodist. besides our own papers at \\'ashiug- 
ton. Birmingham and Blanchard. Iowa, have given 
their sanction, and the White Water United Breth- 
ren conference with the Wesleyan conferences of In- 
diana and Illinois, have taken time by the forelock 
and chosen ten delegates, ministers and laymen, to 
attend the convention when called. 

The conception which originated the idea of a con- 
vention was manifold: 

1. A truly national religious convention which 
shall unite the testimoney of several hundred thou- 
sand Christian people, besides Catholics, who are, 
denominationally and openly committed against the 
secret •■orders:" in the hope of enlisting a million 
more, who want nothing but information to enable 
them to see that •■the lodges are disintegrating the 
churches." 

2. In the further hope, also, of aiding churches, 
like the United Brethren, which are in death-grapple 
with the lodge. The sainted Bishop Edwards, sit- 
ting with the Cynosure editor on a pile of boards in a 
Chicago lumber yard, said, with deep emotion: "The 
National Christian Association was not born an hour 
too soon to save our church. And further, a truly 
National Convention of anti-secrecy churches and 
representative men will work mightily in aid of the 
pastors of colored churches in the South, who have 
discovered that their secret orders are swallowing 
their churches as alligators swallow rabbits, and like 
Brinckley and Countee 
them. 

.3. By such a national convention to erect a plat 
form on which Rev. Joseph Cook may stand to lec- 
ture in Boston, and by his printed lectures, reach 
thinking religionists from Florida to Alaska. 

•4. And these ends accomplished, by their means 
to rescue the temperance cause from the grip of the 
lodge; and in 1838 drive secretly forsworn men from 
the arena of American politics. 

To achieve these grand objects, measures should 
be set on foot at once. The religious convention 
should meet so early in the fall or winter, now at 
hand, as to give Mr. Cook ample time to set the lodge 
in its true light before the religious world before his 
Boston lecture term closes: and as such a convention 
should be preceded by the most ample discussion: 
perhaps a preliminary consultation should be had at 
Dayton, Syracuse, Worcester, or some such place, by 
committees, etc., to agree on preliminaries and dis- 
cuss the call. Will Hon. Halleck Floyd of Dublin, 
Indiana, chairman of the first committee appointed, 
give us the mind of his committee on this whole 
subject? And will the Christian States'man, and the 
Imtructor, of Philadelphia, the Araerican, the Free 
Press, and Blanchard Reord, Iowa, the Wesleyan, 
Free Methodist. Unitejl Preshyterian, Sand}' Lake News 
and other presses opposed to the lodge, Lutheran, 
Baptist, Friend, etc., etc., give this article an inser 
lion and give us their advice. Articles carefully 
written on the subject will be welcomed hi}' the 6j/- 
rt/jsure. 



are struggling • to rescue 



THE LOHLON AGITATION AND THE LODGE 
IN PROPHECY. 



And I saw three unclean spirits like frogs come 
out of the mouth of the dragon, and out of the mouth 
of the beast, and out of the mouth of the false proph- 
et. For they are ihe spirits of devils, working mira- 
cles which go forth unto the kings of the earth. — 
Rev. 16: Y6., 14. 

The Revelation is made up of a series of prophetic 
photographs, or symbolic pictures of providences, 
down to the close of time: 

"Coming events cast their shadows before," 
and these are of them. Mark, they are not frogs, 
but "unclean spirits like frogs," living in church and 
world, as frogs in air and water: issuing from mouths, 
t. e., teaching forces, — from three mouths, to wit, 



Satan's, the beast's or false worship, and the false 
prophet's or the Mormonism of all ages, the three 
mightiest antagonists to God and goodness now on 
earth. And the three are unclean spirits. 

The Archoishop of Canterbury, Bishop of Lon- 
don. Samuel Morley and iMr. Eeid, members of Par- 
liament, and Cardinal Manning, were appointed by 
the Pall Mall Gazette editor to report on the unclean- 
ness of British aristocracy. Cardinal Manning re- 
ports for this commission in the North Ariicrican Re- 
view for October. He says: 

"We decided from the first to exclude any inquiry into charsces 
asainst particular men, or classes of men." 

And then adds: 

"After carefully sif tins the evidence . . . we are satisfied that 
the statements in the Pal! Jfall Goze.lie are substautially correct." 

"The charges'' referred to by the Cardinal, are, in 
substance, what have been published throughout 
England and the United States, namely that an ex- 
tensive slave-trade was kept up of white girls of ten- 
der age, in the city of l^oudon, both for home and 
foreign market; that the ordinary commission on 
these human victims is from fifty to one hundred 
dollars; that experienced villains court simple-hearted 
peasant girls, or children of farmers, doctors, and 
poor clergymen, sometimes with, and sometimes 
without the consent of parents; that the children 
sometimes are ignorant of their destiny, and are 
turned into rooms where screams are unavailing; and 
that the streets of London are peopled by night-walk- 
ing, haggard young wretches, turned out, after being 
passed through the mills of prostitution; and that the 
wealthier classes, notably the English aristocracy, 
are the bidders in these shambles of lust. Cardinal 
Planning admits that London, which represents more 
money than the world besides, with 4,000,000 people, 
may be sunk lower in this gulf of Sodom-ism than 
the United States: but Elizabeth Blackwell after 
forty 3'ears successful medical practice, avers that 
"Philadelphia and New York contain deeper horrors 
than London." 

The history of the Pall Mall Gazette investigations 
is given in this number of the Cynosure by our spec- 
ial and valued contributor Rev. John Boyes, of 
Grimsby. England, and by a portion of Cardinal 
Manning's North American Review article. It ap- 
pears that some five years since the escaping flames 
from this lower hell of societj^ alarmed the British 
public, and started in Parliament the Criminal Law 
Amendment Bill, which dragg.ed its slow length 
along through five years of languid legislation until 
this Pall 31all Gazette denouement. The editor ap- 
plied himself to distinguished friends of that bill, 
archbishops, bishops, and others of the above named 
commission; and, having secured their moral protec- 
tion, proceeded to gather facts from heads of hospi- 
tals, houses of refuge and other reputable people, 
and compared them with the evidence of procurers, 
paramours, broken-down brothel-keepers professing 
reform, who for money, and promised immunity were 
willing to recite the history of their crimes. Such is 
this London agitation. 

ITS RELATION TO THE LODGE. 

Throughout the Bible history false worships and 
whoredom are twins inseparable; and the world- 
hatred of the Hebrew nation turned chiefly perhaps 
on the fact that their laws punished adultery with 
death. The lodge omitting Father, Son and Holy 
Ghost, has no system of right and wrong. It does 
not protect female virtue, but only the female rela- 
tions of Masons. Nor is it to be overlooked that the 
Prince of Wales is, at once, head of the British aris- 
tocracy, and head of British Masons; and that these 
are the chief purchasers in this slave-mart of prosti- 
tution, whose partial unveiling is now moving Eng- 
land and the United States. The brothel system 
and the lodge system are both alike secret; and both 
alike Christless: and the Salvation Army may 
clamor and clang their tamboureens against this girl 
traflic, but while they are silent concerning the lodge 
their testimony will be but as sounding brass or a 
tinkling C3mbal. 

The "secret orders" of the lodge diff'e'r from "or- 
ders of nobility" only as images differ from their ob- 
jects. In the old palace yard, over against the new 
Buckingham Palace, the lodge is still shown where 
the Duke of York shot his footman for objecting to 
his intimacy with his wife; and the law took no no- 
tice of the murder. As the "Image of the Beast" 
exercised all the power of the beast itself, so the 
lodge-shams of "titled orders" satisfy the devil and 
answer his dark purposes as well as the "orders of 
nobility," which our fathers excluded by our Con- 
stitutions, Federal and State, as the certain bane of 
the RepuV>lic. An "order" of men gives standing 
to its members without requiring them to be virtuous 
and screens crime and infam}' from loathing. It 
thus strangles virtue with one hand and shields vice 



with the other: and, as our war was a failure till it 
struck slavery, so the outciy against making mer- 
chandize of women and girls, whether in Salt Lake 
or London, will amount to nothing till it strikes the 
lodsie which shelters both. 



WHO ABOLISHED SLAVERY? 

Senator George F. Hoar has made a two hours' 
political speech, in which he treated the ex-slaves as 
wards of the Republican party, and said the Repub- 
licans would insist on their having their rights. The 
Chicago Times scouts the claim of the Republicans 
to the honor of abolishing slaveiy, and recalls the 
fact that the Republican leaders avowed, over again, 
and constantly, that they fought only against seces- 
sion, and that slavery was not in the issue. The 
Democrats lay no claim to the abolition. They re- 
proached the Republicans as "black abolitionists," 
as a political war-club. . Both these parties deny the 
abolitionists all credit for the abolition. Who, then, 
did abolish it ? All now agree that the abolition 
was a glorious consummation, and the Fourth of 
July will henceforth shout the praises of a country 
without king or slave. And all know that if some peo- 
ple had not endured unpopularity, scorn, and mob vio- 
lence in his behalf, the slave would to-day be wear- 
ing his chains. Who abolished slavery ? 



HUMAN FEROCITY. 



Those who see nothing supernatural in the secret 
lodge system have a very imperfect understanding 
of it. The more than savage ferocitj', the murder- 
spirit of the lodge springs from the desire to wrest 
from Christ the worship and fealty of this globe, and 
the bitterness is proportioned to the vastness of the 
stake. 

The East Boston, Mass., Advocate comes to us with 
the following editorial, which explains itself. It 
verifies and illustrates the Scriptures: "The wicked 
hateth the just, and gnasheth upon him with his 
teeth." 

"In view of the large fraternity existing among 
the members of the various secret organizations of 
the land and the vast amount of good accomplished • 
through their instrumentality (which result must be 
apparent to every observer) it is rare to hear a per- 
son speak lightly or disparagingly of such orders. 
Occasionally, however, one may be found who has 
something to say against secret organizations; but 
the general opinion concerning such a man is, that 
he is too mean and too selfish to invest in anything 
to benefit his fellowmen, or, that he is so contempti- 
ble as to have been refused admission to orders and 
therefore feeling aggrieved very naturally vents his 
spite in tirades against secret orders. 

Such a 'crank' made an exhibition of himself in 
an adult Sunday-school class in East Boston, recent- 
ly, and received a rebuke, and was taught a lesson 
which he may not soon forget. Somehow the con- 
versation turned on secret organizations, and the 
"crank" in great bitterness (he is one of that class 
who is never happy unless he is miserable) inveighed 
against all secret societies. In the class was the 
widow of a member of the Grand Army of the Re- ' 
public, the members of which had cared for their 
comrade during his long and painful illness, had 
closed his eyes in death, and had rendered kind of- 
fices to his family since his decease. Fully realizing 
her deep indebtedness to the Post, and convulsed with 
grief at the animadversions hurled at secret societies 
(to which feeling it is not improbable there was add- 
ed a sense of indignation that there should be al- 
lowed to crawl on God's footstool a creature mean 
enough to be so abusive), the lady for a while could 
not control her voice sufficiently to reply. Finally, 
she was able to pay a glowing tribute to the unsel- 
fish devotion of the Grand Army towards its com- 
rades, to which was added the corroboration of a 
member of the organization who was present. Of 
course the discussion did not last long, but it was of 
sufficient duration we hope to teach the "crank" a 
lesson; and while he may not profit by it (for it 
takes a man with a soul to be generous to his fellow 
men) he may possibly find an analogy in it between 
the labors of such organizations and the teachings of 
Him whom the "crank" professes to serve, and who 
said: "He who gives a cup of cold water to one of 
these little ones shall in no way lose his reward." 



Between Two Opinions, the new reform story, 
will go to press in a few days, and our publisher 
will be ready to fill orders. Those who come first 
will be first served, and orders sent in early will not 
be disappointed either in the appearance of the book 
or its contents. We predict for it a greater sale than 
any other book of the kind. Send in your orders ; 
$1.00 for cloth bound ; 60 cents in paper cover. 



Rvmai 



October 8, 1886 



THE CHRISTIAN CyKOSUKE, 



GOOD TEMPLARS. 



Every child of God has seen Christ; has "beheld 
the Lamb of God." The effect of that faith-vision 
never bleaches out. Every Good Templar has wor- 
shiped Satan — has done precisely what Satan asked 
and Christ refused to do. And each act of this 
Gentile or demon-worship blinds, however trivial the 
act, as looking religiously at the sun, or kissing the 
hand to the "moon walking in brightness," or any 
one of the endless trivialities of the lodge. And 
each such act leaves a something in the mind which 
only confession and the blood of Christ can "cleanse," 
take out. 

The late World's Grand Lodge of Good Templars 
at Toronto gives six hundred and thirty-nine thousand 
nine hundred and twenty- five members; and what is 
curious, temperance thrives best where the Tem- 
plars are the fewest. Iowa has 947, and Pennsyl- 
vania 9,324. 

Six hundred thousand Good Templars meeting 
weekly ought to have regenerated our whole coun- 
try. But a secret societ}' regenerates nothing. 
Like Achan's gold and garments, they are "accursed 
things," because used for idolatry. In Wheaton, 
111., the "WorthyC?) Chief Templar" advocated li- 
censing two beer saloons which sold whisky, to get 
the German vote to remove the court house to 
Wheaton, and his lodge sustained him/ The New 
York Grand Lodge has just given a two- thirds vote 
against the St. John Prohibition party, and three 
hundred delegates left that N. Y. Grand Lodge be- 
came it voted against signing liquor licenses. If 
in the face of such facts men like Samuel D. Hast- 
ings do not see that a secret lodge is an "accursed 
thing," they will be given over to hardness of heart 
and blindness of mind. Christ alone can cure such 
blindness. Let us pray that their eyes may be 
opened. 

True, more money can be raised by secret socie- 
ties than by anything else except popery. And it is 
also true that there is not conscience enough in this 
or any other country to expel a moral evil. But if 
Prohibitionists, whose consciences are not "seared," 
will stand together on the American platform, they 
will be a solid, impregnable phalanx, as were the 
Abolitiofl party, and one other party will vote for 
anti-secret candidates. Thus again, selfishness will 
complete what the fear of God begins. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



— Our "Secret Empire" history includes an inter- 
esting original article this week, as well as a selec- 
tion. Next week the Masonic account from Hardies' 
Monitor, 1812, will be found entertaining to our 
readers. 

— Secretary Stoddard sends some of his most hope- 
ful letters this week. All the lecturers will do well 
to memorize his advice to them. He expected to 
spend the Sabbath and Monday at Altoona and the 
day following at Galva, 111., and will possibly stop 
two or three days at Elmira, Stark county, among 
the staunch Scotch Presbyterians. 

— Bro. W. B. Stoddard had an important engage- 
ment on Tuesdaj' evening in the German Methodist 
church at 485 North Ashland Avenue. Upon this 
large and interesting church he hoped to make a 
strong impression for the truth. 

— It is reported that Joseph Cook is engaged in 
the preparation of a new lecture on "Political Signs 
of the Times," including Prohibition and Civil Ser- 
vice Reform. No doubt he will find place for a 
word on American politics also. 

The American party in Van Buren county have 
their war paint on. A full county ticket is in the 
field. They refuse to support any man for oflSce who 
has taken secret oaths. They believe in putting one's 
principles into every day practice. — Amity Index, 
College Springs, Iowa. 

— "Masonic saints" may sound somewhat strange 
to our readers; but Masonry, as defined by her best 
authors, proposes to raise her faithful adherents to a 
sanctity of life which shall fully fit them for the in- 
heritance of the saints in light. Christianity can do 
no more. True, the methods of the two are ex- 
tremely different, but this is no impediment with 
Masons. The knock-down and drag-out process is, 
in their eyes, of equal virtue with repentance toward 
God; and the investure with an apron of equal effi- 
cacy with faith in the atonement of our Lord Jesus 
Christ; while the removal of the bandage from the 
physical sight is considered of equal potency with 
the illumination of the Holy Ghost. Materialistic, 
bombastic and buffoonish as is this religion, there 
are many who appear willing to risk their eternal 
interests thereon, while there are those who seek to 
serve in both this and Christianity, and insanely 
conceive that they may be made compatible with 
each other. — Free Methodist. 



— Among the callers upon the Cynosure within the 
last week was Bro. S. Simpson of Garfield, Washing- 
ton Territory, during his first visit to Chicago. 
Though from a remote part of the country he reports 
occasional lectures in his vicinity, generally bj^ 
preachers of the United Brethren church. 

— Rev. James Donaldson of Gait, a province of 
Ontario, visited us also on his way to take charge of 
a United Presbyterian church near Waterloo, iowa. 
his occasional lectures in the vicinity of his home in 
Canada, have been almost the only public efforts 
against the lodge in that part of the country. 

— Rev. J. D. Gehring, a contributor who is always 
welcomed by Cynosure readers, spent a day with us 
in the office and at Wheaton last week on his way 
home from a northern trip. Bro. Gehring has for 
years been in very poor health, sometimes even in a 
critical condition, resulting from wounds and disease 
contracted in the army. He is connected with Park 
College near Kansas City, Missouri. This wonder- 
ful institution has now over 300 students, and is con- 
ducted on a kind of family-manual-labor plan with 
marked success. 

— Bro. Geo. T. Dissette has begun his fall campaign 
in Illinois round about his home in DuPage county. 
An appointment at Prospect Park was made last 
week, but the meeting failed on account of the dark 
and rainy evening. 

— Bro. Thos. K. Doty, of the Christian Harvester, 
Canton, Ohio, has been engaged also as a correspond- 
ing editor of the Banner of Holiness, of Blooming- 
ton, III, the representative of the Western Holiness 
Association. 

— The trial of Rev. Edward Mathews in Cold- 
water, Mich., has resulted in his conviction, but he 
has appealed to a higher court. On account of the 
lodge prejudice he endeavored to secure a change 
of venue, but this was not granted, though his re- 
quest was supported by such evidence as would have 
carried the point in ordinary cases. His case was 
managed by his brother, an able lawyer from Detroit, 
who, with the judge, was surprised at the verdict of 
the jury. Bro. Mathews is a poor man, and cannot 
well meet the expense of a prolonged suit. He has had 
aid to the amount of $100, and doubtless has the 
sympathy and prayers of all who have read his ac- 
counts of the trouijle in these columns. 

■ — F. W. A. Riedel, editor of the Investigator, late 
of Stewartsville, Missouri, reported a disgraceful 
case of thievery in which two women of that place 
were detected, in his paper of August 29th. The 
account, though probably true, was severe and ag- 
gi'avating, and his enemies took advantage of this 
and raised a mob, driving him from the place. Bro. 
Riedel has the sympathy of a number of editorial 
friends and probably of the best people of Stewart- 
ville; the lodge, the saloon and petty thieves are glad 
to get him far away from them. He has located at 
Osborn, a small town on the Hannibal road and is- 
sues again the Investigator regularly. The reformers 
of Northwestern Missouri might find his paper a 
useful auxiliary in driving out the lodge. 

— A great manj- people who would otherwise have 
opposed the G. A. R. consoled them with the thought 
that their numbers would gradually diminish. But 
the movement called the Sons of Veterans adds to 
these organizations the power of perpetuating their 
existence for another generation. We regret to see 
it. We honor the soldier and hope to see the pat- 
riots who saved the nation ever honored and respect- 
ed, but we know that these organizations will not 
lead to this. They are lessening the respect for the 
old soldier every day, and the coming generation 
will not honor them as they otherwise would have 
done, if they had kept their fair names from becom- 
ing entangled with the pomp, foolishness and pre- 
sumption of these societies. — Amity Index. 

— Rev. S. M. Hill, formerly missionary among the 
Mormons, writes, correcting a late note in these col- 
umns on the retirement of Judge Hunter from the 
chief-justiceship of Utah, and the appointment of 
Judge Powers of Michigan. Bro. Hill lived two 
years in Salt Lake City, and from a personal know- 
ledge of the facts says the Americans of Utah long 
tried to have Hunter superseded, since his decisions 
were evidently modified by Mormon influence, and 
perhaps bribes. We hope for other information 
about Mormondon from Bro. Hill. 

— At the late meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the National Reform Association in Philadelphia, 
Rev. J. H. Lieper was engaged to visit Arkansas in 
answer to calls from that State for address on reli- 
gious reform in government. A committee was ap- 
pointed to prepare and forward a protest to the Pres- 
ident and Postmaster General against the desecration 
of the Sabbath by the new postal delivery mails. 



THE SECRET EMPIRE- 



MASONIC HISTORY. 



[From the American additions to Chambers' Encyclopedia in 
Library of Universal Knowledge. 1 

In regard to this whole matter of antiquity, there 
is nothing in the traditions of the order so excep- 
tionally remarkable as to make any special demand 
on our credulity. Men have been constituted after 
the same fashion from the beginning of time; and, 
given the same motive and the same or a similar en- 
vironment and like opportunities, thej' may be as- 
sumed to act in the same way. The organization of 
the craft-guild in northern and central Europe as 
early as the 7th century is a sufficient illustration of 
the tendency to association among men, and particu- 
larly among the laboring or "craft" classes, to prove 
this. We know that among the Greeks, and Romans 
also, such association occurred in various directions, 
and there is no sound i-eason for disbelief in the pos- 
sible combination of the architects and master-build- 
ers of Rome in the time of Numa Porapilius. as is 
claimed by the masons. Whether we are to accept 
the traditions which point to Solomon's temple, and 
refer to the times of the ancient Egyptains for the 
period of the foundation of the order, is a matter not 
of vital importance; though the same reasoning that 
answers in the case of Rome is equally sound in that 
of Egypt. Certaiulj^ when one contemplates the 
P3'ramids, Memphis, Thebes, Denderah, and the other 
ruins of marvelous structures built by the Egyptian 
masons and architects, there is nothing absurd in the 
supposition that then, as now, associated effort 
might have been concerned, and that the associations 
concerned might have organized on some such basis 
as is involved in the traditional history of freemason- 
ry. The Roman colleges of builders are said to have 
been created by Numa Pompilius in 715 b. c. In 
52 A. D. the corporations of constructors were estab- 
lished in Great Britain. In a. d. 290 Caransius, 
commander of the Roman fleet, is said to have re- 
newed the ancient constitution and privileges of the 
Roman colleges, with the view of gaining the favor 
of the builders, who were a very powerful associa- 
tion: the architect Albanus, sent to Great Britain as 
an inspector of the constructors or masons, is cred- 
ited with being the first Christian martyr in Britain, 
he having been beheaded for preaching the doctrine 
of Christ. 

A congress of masons was held at Basle, in 1563, 
and at Strasburg in 1564; and in 1607 king James 
I. of England proclaimed himself protector of the 
freemasons. In 1663 a general assembly of English 
masons took place at York, and was presided over 
by king Charles II. In 1666, at the time of the 
great fire in London, there were but seven lodges of 
masons in the city; and in 1703 these had declined 
to four, though Sir Christopher Wren, the aged grand 
master, exhibited great zeal in endeavoring to foster 
the progress, and increase the order. In France, 
in 1539, Frances I. suspended all the corporations of 
workmen, and freemasonry became extinguished in 
that country, not to be revived, until 1721. 

It was in the year 1703 that the English masons 
forming the lodge of St. Paul, having completed the 
erection of the cathedral, passed the resolution which 
opened the doors of the order to others than practi- 
cal masons and builders. This resolution reads as 
follows: "Resolved, that the privilege of masonry 
shall no longer be confined to operative masons, but 
be free to men of all professions, provided that they 
are regularly approved and initiated into the frater- 
nity." This important decision entirely changed the 
nature of the society and transformed it into the 
body as we find it to-day. In 1717 the grand lodge 
of London was constituted, and put into execution 
the resolution of 1703: see Masons, Free, anfe. In 
1864 the three grand lodges of Great Britain con- 
trolled 109 provincial grand lodges, with 1597 opera- 
tive lodges under their jurisdiction, which extended 
their connections to every part of the globe. Free- 
masonry was introduced into Denmark in 1783; 
France,"l721; in Sweden, in 1736; Russia, in 1731; 
Belgium, 1721; Holland, 1725; Germany, 1737; 
Switzerland, 1737; Italy, 1729; Portugal, 1735; Spain, 
1727. It is claimed that a lodge was established in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, as early as 1750, the first in 
the British dominions in America; but this state- 
ment is not fully credited. Of the five provinces 
which comprise the dominion of Canada, Prince Ed- 
ward Island alone has its lodges subject to the grand 
lodges of Great Britain. The first lodge ifi the New 
England colonies was opened in Boston in 1733. 
After the war of independence, grand lodges were or- 
ganized in all the States. 

What are you doing for the Cynosure subscrip- 
tion list? 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



OCTOBEK 8, 1885 



The Home, 



OUT OF SI GET. 



When the hillsides are flushed with the pink of the laurel, 

And ereen are the meadows where lambs are at play, 
"Mid snow-drifts of clover, and blush-blooms of sorrel, 

There's beaaty broadcast on the fair summer day. 
In the distance the mountains are purple and hoary : 

And nearer the valleys are sweet in the sun, 
Earth turns a new leaf in the brilliant old etory , 

Which ever istellinar. and never is done. 

But alway, my heart in the midst of the splendor, 

Goes roving afar from the beauty I see. 
And thought, with affection ineffably tender. 

Flits swifter than pinion of bird or of bee. 
To pause in the clefts never trodden by mortal. 

To climb to the heights where the morning is born, 
To rest, like a pDgrim, at ease in the portal 

Ajar for the lark soaring up from the corn. 

There, swinging their censers, and lighting the altjirs, 

In gloom or in grandeur, built only for God. 
■Wher* winds are the miustrelsjand mountains the psalters, 

Sweet, sweet, are the flowers which sprinkle the sod; 
There facing the sky when the tempest is over, 

Ard strong with resistance to whirl and to shock. 
The pine to the sun lifts the look of a lover. 

With head heaven-tossing, and roots in the rock. 

Brave beauty, alone for the Lord and his angels: — 

How qtiiet and soothing the lesson it brings ! 
A heart-chord struck out from the best of evangels, 

A strain for the soul which in solitude sings. 
No child of the Father should ever be dreary, 

>'or slip from the blessing, the gladness, the light, 
For God and the angels will never grow weary 

Of guarding and keeping what blooms out of sight. 

— Jfargant E. Gangster, hi S. S. Time-':. 



ried through the streets of Darmouth, accompanied 
by the magistrates. And yet, so meek was he, that 
at the moment the effigy was burning, he was pray- 
ing for the town, and the news reached him at the 
conclusion of his prayer. He still went on praying, 
and added, "Father, forgive them; for they know 
not whatthev do." (Luke 23: 34.) 



miles from its mouth, to found the Western China 
mission of the Methodist church, in a city said to 
number 260,000 families." 



WHF BO WE SING IN GEURGE? 



GOING WITEOUT RELIGION. 



TEE PURE IN EEART. 



Some are greatly perplexed to understand how the 
blood of Christ can cleanse the heart from sin — how 
we can wash our robes and make them white in the 
blood of the Lamb. The word blood, in this connec- 
tion, refers to the atonement that Christ made for 
sin. and this is the procuring cause of our salvation; 
and this great price of the blood of the everlasting 
covenant, secured for us -the gift of the Holy Ghost." 
So we are made pure b}" the incoming of the Holy 
Ghost, through the merits and death of the Loid 
Jesus Christ. The fullness of the Holy Ghost is en- 
tire sanctification. 

Let us always remember that when the Holy Ghost 
comes into the soul, he comes to rule that soul. He 
will not take full possession until there is an abso- 
lute surrender to his swaj*. Some sa}-, '•! submitted 
when I was converted." Yes, you did; but it was 
the submission of a rebel laying down his weapons 
of rebellion. Now you must submit j'ourself as a 
loj'al man, who is willing to lay down his life for his 
country. At conversion you gave alij-our bad things 
to God; after you are converted jom give all your 
good things. Tea, you give hini all— "a living sac- 
rifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is j'our rea- 
sonable service." 

Some years ago a rich man was on his knees at a 
national camp-meeting seeking for heart-purity, but 
there was a conflict going on in his mind. In the 
midst of his praving he took out his pocket-book and 
pencil, and began to make an estimate of how much 
he could give to God without embarrassing his busi- 
ness. He concluded that he could give s5,000, and 
decided to do so and soon the jo}' of heaven welled 
up in his heart. That $5,000 started our Jlexican 
Mission! He went home and related his experience 
to his wife and she was under conviction for holi- 
ness, but the blessing lingered and she hardly knew 
wh}-. At last her husband said: "I have been mak- 
ing a calculation and find that the jewels that j-ou 
wear, if .sold, would sustain a missionary in China 
for eighteen years, and now will you give them up 
for Christ's sake?" 

When Miss Frances Fudley Havergal was seeking 
purity of heart she had about fifty jewels that had 
been given to her. She felt that Jesus must have 
them, so she sent thera — all except a plain pin and 
watch-chain which she kept for use — to the Mission- 
ary- Societj-. 

So must we all yield our whole being and sub- 
stance to God, saying — 

"Take my soul and body's powers. 
Take my memory, mind, and will. 

All my goods and all my hours, 
AH I know and all I feel, 

All I think, or speak, or do, 
Take my heart and make it new." 

G-ai/le to Holi'fiegs. 



I fear that when we indulge ourselves in the 
amusement of going without a religion we are not, 
perhaps, aware how much we are sustained at pres- 
ent by an enormous mass all about us of religion? 
feeling and religious conviction, so that, whatever it 
may be safe for us to think, for us who have had 
great advantages and have been brought up in such 
a way that a certain moral direction has been given 
to our characters, I do not know what would become 
of the less favored classes of mankind if they under- 
took to play the same game. 

Whatever defects and imperfections may attach to 
a few points of the doctrine of Calvin — the "bulk of 
which was simpl}' what all Christians believe — it 
will be found that Calvinism, or an}' other ism which 
claims an open Bible and proclaims a crucified and 
risen Christ, is infinitely preferable to any form of 
polite and polished scepticism which gathers as its 
votaries the degenerate sons of heroic ancestors, 
who, having been trained in a society and educated 
in schools, the foundations of which were laid by 
men of faith and piety, now turn and kick down the 
ladder by which thej' have climbed up, and persuade 
men to live without God and leave them to die with- 
out hope. 

The worst kind of religion is no religion at all; 
and these men, living in ease and luxury, indulging 
themselves in the "amusement of going without reli- 
gion," may be thankful that they live inlands where 
the Gospel they neglect has tamed the beastliness 
and ferocity of the men who, but for Christianity, 
might long ago have eaten their carcasses like the 
South Sea islanders, or cut oflT their heads and tanned 
their hides like the monsters of the French Revolu- 
tion. When the microscopic search of scepticism 
which has haunted the heavens and sounded the 
seas to disprove the existence of a Creator, has turned 
its attention to human society and has found a place 
on this planet ten miles square where a decent man 
can live in decency, comfort, and security, support- 
ing and educating his children unspoiled and unpol- 
luted, a place where age is reverenced, infancy re- 
spected, manhood respected, womanhood honored 
and human life held in due regard — when skeptics 
can find such a place ten miles square on this globe 
where the Gospel of Christ has not gone and cleared 
the way and laid the foundation and made decency 
and security possible, it will then be in order for 
the skeptical literati to move thither and then ven- 
tilate their views. But so long as these very men 
are dependent upon the religion which they discard 
for every privilege which they enjoy, they may well 
hesitate a little before they seek to rob the Christian 
of his hope and humanity of its faith in that Saviour 
who alone has given to man that hope of life eternal 
which makes life tolerable and society possible and 
robs death of its terrors and the grave of its gloom. 
— James Russell Lowell. 



If 3^ou ask me wherefore song was made a part 
of the worship, the answer must be because music 
is the fit language of a service of love. No man 
sings when he is angr}'. The notes of accordant 
voices speak of amit}' and fellowshi}). As music is 
said to consist of the harmonj" of sweet sounds, and 
as sounds without harmony become mere noise, so 
the strains of the psalm or hymn are at once the 
type and sign of the communion of saints. Where 
they are heard we know that souls have met who are 
without varience. They are the signal of the pres- 
ence of the peace of Christ and of God. And as 
the cords of human hearts should thrill together in 
glad unison when they come before God, whenever 
they find expression in such singing they tend to do 
so. Music is the tamer of evil passions. We can- 
not hate each other when we sing together. 

Among all the numberless things men can do with 
their varied faculties, songs are asked of them, to 
be offered before God, that they may stand before 
his mercy-seat in unity, and turn from his presence 
better prepared to live in charity and peace. — New 
York Evangelist. 



Meekness. — That eminently holy man and well- 
known writer (Flavel) did not escape the misfortunes 
of his times. In the year 1685, his effigy was car- 



CERI8T1AN EER0E8. 

That the age of Christian heroism is not past is 
evident from the following, communicated to the 
Evangelist by one reporting the International Mis- 
sionary Conference, held six weeks ago at Niagara : 

"There were those there, who for Christ's sake and 
his Gospel's had endured Arctic winters and Tropic 
heats, who had preached salvation by Christ alone 
among the bigoted Romanists of Spain and Italy 
and South America, and the intolerant Mohamme- 
dans of Turkey, had ministered to the famine-stricken 
myriads of North China, and the outcasts and even 
the lepers of India. One (of the Canada Methodist 
church), a willing exile with his wife to the Cree In- 
dian cfjuntry, 700 miles north of Lake Winnipeg, 
where the cold is 58 degrees below zero, had traveled 
thousands of miles in sledges drawn by dogs, camp- 
ing in the snow night after night ; another (of the 
Presbyterian mission to Siam) had been gored by a 
treacherous elephant in the I^aos forests ; a veteran 
missionary of the American Board from 'Turkey had 
had three of his colleagues killed at different times 
by robbers in that land of violence ; and yet another, 
the venerable Dr. Dean, of the Baptist mission to the 
Chinese, bore in his person the scars of spear thrusts 
made by Malay pirates near Singapore ; while an- 
other could tell of his adventures as he had boldly 
pushed on up the great Yang-tse Kiang river, 1,700 



SUNDAY WEALING, 



I never encountered inore than one whaling-captain 
who scrupled to follow his vocation on theSabbath.This 
was a Scotchman, named Graham, master of the ship 
Leonidas, of Greenock. We met with him in the 
South Pacific. Although somewhat eccentric, and 
very decided in the exercises of a strong will, he so 
commanded the esteem of his crew that, during the 
entire voyage, not a man deserted from him. 

At the time of our first dropping in company with 
the Leonidas, she wanted sixteen hundred barrels to 
complete her cargo, while our own ship — the Roger 
Williams — which had been out half a year longer 
than the other, required but twelve hundred. 

For a month or two previous to the meeting nei- 
ther vessel had been fortunate; but the next morning, 
while the Scotchman was barely four miles from us, 
there appeared, betweenjthe ships^a school of whales. 

The Roger Williams having been hastily set to, 
we pushed off in boats, our officers glancing anxious- 
ly toward the Leonidas and urging us to pull strong- 
ly for the first chance at the game. And, indeed, 
as the Scotch ship was to the windward, and could, 
therefore, easily have run down upon the school, the 
impulse to exertion on our part was very natural. 

But the good North Briton sailed leisurely on, 
starting neither brace nor bowline. 

"What's that fellow about?" said his mate. "It 
can't be that he don't see the whales, yet he 
hasn't altered his course, nor lowered a boat!" 

The fact was surprising to us; we knew not how 
to account for it. Could his crew have mutinied? 
or could some other calamity have happened, suffi- 
cient to render a whaleman inactive at such a mo- 
ment? 

We had no time, however, to speculate — an excit- 
ing chase was before us — and the result of our morn- 
ing's work was the securing of seven whales, of 
moderate size, yielding, in the aggregate, one hun- 
dred and ninety barrels of oil. 

But ere this was accompished, the truth had 
dawned upon us with regard to the countryman of 
excellent old John Knox. 

Some of us had heard of a captain — whether 
Scotch, English, or American — who would not catch 
whales on Sabbath, yet who alwa^'s made good voy- 
ages; and this quaint old Caledonian must be the 
man. 

It was the Sabbath, surely; the Leonidas was a 
whaler, wasn't she? yet she lowered no boat, did 
she? So the force of logic settled the matter. 

Several times during the week the Leonidas was 
only a few miles from us, and more than once her 
boats and ours were baffled in attempting to approach 
whales, neither vessel taking any oil in the course of 
the six days. But when Sabbath again came around 
the good fortune of our crew returned. 

Three miles from the Roger Williams, and almost 
within hailing distance of the Scot, we captured a huge 
fellow, yielding one hundred and thirty Ijarrels, while 
the men of the Greenock looked on, making no dem- 
onstration. 

"What a fool that old Scotchman is I" said our 
commander. Captain May. "He might have had 
that whale in spite of us! No luck all last week, 
and then to throw away such a chance as this! Who 
ever heard of such a thing? A man must take 
whales whenever he gets them ! 



So we had secured. 



in all, three hundred and twen- 



October 8, 1B85 



THE Cr:RISTIAK CTKOSUBE. 



11 



ty barrels since first speaking with Captain Graham, 
while he had taken nothing. 

We now wanted less than nine hundred to fill, and 
wondered when, with his peculiar management, 
he would complete the sixteen hundred required by 
his own ship. 

"Well, I don't know how he'll come out," remarked 
a thoughtful old boat-steerer of ours; "but we can't 
laugh at him much yet. We've been from home 
twenty -eight months and got twenty-one hundred 
barrels. He's been from home twenty-two months 
and got twenty-four hundred barrels. Sixteen hun- 
dred more will give him his four thousand, and nine 
hundred more will give us our three thousand. 
You'd laugh the other side of your mouths if he 
should get full first. His ship will stow a thousand 
more than the Roger Williams, but it would be just 
like him to fall in with a streak of luck and fill her 
right up." 

Six months passed away, during which time we 
occasionally fell in with ships of the great fleet of 
Pacific whalemen, but with the Leonidas of tener than 
any other; and after all our contemptuous remarks 
upon her captain, it was with some mortification that, 
from time to time, we were obliged to admit the gen- 
eral success of the Sabbath-observing Scotchman to 
be greater than our own. 

During all the secular days of some given week, 
he might cruise in vain, taking not a drop of oil or 
even seeing a whale, but this would make no differ- 
ence in his conduct on the succeeding sacred day, 
when perhaps the monsters would send up in the 
sunlight their clear spouts all about him, and the 
boats of other ships would be sweeping down u2>on 
the prey. 

In the presence of these Sabbath temptations he 
could bide his time, letting no recurrence of un- 
fruitful weeks or even months shake his devotion to 
principle. And certain it was, that in spite of occa- 
sional disappointments incident to the business, he 
was, upon the whole, more fortunate than most of 
his brother-whalers. 

He now wanted little more oil than ourselves, and 
there seemed no longer any joke in the suggestion 
of his filling up before us. He surely would do so 
should the same ratio of increase continue with the 
two ships to the end. But how uncertain the busi- 
ness was! Sometimes a ship in that great fleet of 
the Pacific would go for a hundred days without tak- 
ing a whale, then in a week, perhaps secure three or 
four hundred barrels. 

Again we lost sight of the Scotchman, and two 
months passed away, when early one Sabbath morn- 
ing our lookouts raised a very large school. 

Such incidents with us were more apt to happen 
as it seemed on the Sabbath than at other time, just 
as great battles, it is said, occur more frequently 
then than on week-days. 

All was excitement, and away we pulled in the 
boats; hoping from this school to make a full ship. 
One works with a strong heart in chase of his last 
whale. 

But the game proved wild, and all day long we 
followed the shy creatures in vain, until the boats 
became scattered miles apart. 

I was with the captain, and the order which he 
gave at sunset to pull for the ship was a most wel- 
come one. But he had scarcely spoken when an im- 
mense whale, apparently an outsider, not belonging 
to the school, came up within a furlong of us, send^ 
ing his spout aloft, and lying temptingly quiet, with 
his long, dark back above the waves. 

So wearied as to be rendered half-indiffei'ent, we 
exercised less caution than usual, pulling in such a 
manner that at the moment the harpoon was launched, 
the bow of the boat went directly upon the whale. 

His broad tail was partially under us. He moved 
it a little aside, then, like lightning, brought it over 
our heads and struck a downward blow. 

Quick as was the stroke, three of us avoided it by 
plunging overboard; but Captain May and two oth- 
ers were killed upon the spot. 

The boat was demolished — beaten flat to the ocean 
surface — and across the wreck lay the body of the 
captain; while the two men sank, looking ghastly as 
they settled slowly beneath us. 

All the succeeding night, we three who were left re- 
mained clinging to the light cedar boards and tim- 
bers, with the corpse of Captain May lying in the 
midst of us, the ship being twelve miles off, and her 
crew ignorant of our position. 

Floating there with the dead captain, we passed a 
dreadful trying night, and morning seemed hardly 
to improve our condition, for it did not reveal the 
Roger Williams, or any of her boats. She had last 
been observed to the leeward, and in looking for us 
would have to beat slowly up against a light wind in 
a somewhat hazy atmosphere. 

A little after sunrise, however, we were gladdened 
by the sight of a ship to windward coming down in 



our direction, and presently observed between her 
and ourselves the spout of a whale. 

She hove to and lowered her boats in chase, but 
the monster turned flukes and went down, leaving 
his pursuers to pull leisurely along for a few min- 
utes and then lie still, waiting for his reappearnce. 

Up he came, breaching high as he shot out of the 
water so close to us that we could see him distinctly, 
and once more the four boats of the ship were pulled 
rapidly toward him, but with such dexterity and si- 
lence that we could hear no sound; for now the men 
had shipped their oars and taken their paddles. 

While the pursuers had lain waiting, and keenly 
looking out for the whale, they had evidently discov- 
ered us, for we had seen them wave their little "wafts" 
to assure us of it; and therefore we could now watch 
the chase relieved of anxiety for ourselves. The 
animal slowly moved ahead. 

With what energy the paddles were now plied, but 
how noiselessly ! 'Then a stout, square fellow, at the 
bow of the leading boat, ceasing his work, braced 
himself carefully, and we saw the gleam of his har- 
poon. 

In another moment it rushed through the air like 
an arrow, striking the whale just as he humped his 
back to go down. 

As the monster disappeared, the three other boats 
were pulled rapidly up to the scene, to be of service 
should he bid fair, before raising, to take out a great- 
er length of line than the first boat had on board. 

He went immensely deep. The second 
line of the boat which had struck him was 
added to the first, but this did not make enough, 
and then the two lines of another were successively 
bent on. At last he came up, after having exhausted 
two lines and a half and was killed at the end of a 
short run. 

We were now taken up by one of the boats, and 
found that our rescuers, who had accomplished so 
much more on Monday morning than we had on the 
Sabbath were the good Scotchmen of the Leonidas. 

The body of Cap Lain May was reverently taken 
up, and, as the Roger Williams could now be made 
out to the leeward, the boat which took us from the 
forlorn boards was ordered to convey both the corpse 
and ourselves to our own ship. 

Our mate and crew were thrown into consterna- 
tion at the catastrophe which had happened, and the 
former insisted upon getting Captain Graham on 
board to perform the burial service. 

The body was accordingly kept until next day, 
when, the Roger Williams and Leonidas both lying 
hove to, the Greenock ship-master came on board of 
us, and, standing upon our quarter-deck, read the 
impressive words for the occasion, while the British 
and American flags drooped at half-mast on board the 
respective ships. 

Fast in the back of the captured whale, the Scot- 
tish crew found a harpoon, marked "Roger Williams," 
and hence knew that the leviathan they had taken 
was the very animal which had given Captain May 
his death. 

As the creature yielded a hundred and fifty bar- 
rels, and the Leonidas wanted only one-third of this 
amount, the remainder was taken by our mate, who 
had now become captain, and it proved fullj^ suffi- 
cient to give us the quantity we required. 

A week later, both ships, completely full, rode at 
anchor in the Bay of Islands — the Scotchman stow- 
ing a thousand barrels more than ourselves, although 
his voyage had been six months shorter than ours, 
and, considering all the circumstances, there could 
be little doubt that Captain Graham's Sabbath days 
had been more profitably spent in reading 

"Those strains that ouce did sweet ia Zion glide," 
than had been our own in chasing whales. — The 
Standard Bearer. 



TEMPERANCE. 



The consumption of alcoholic liquors in the LTuited 
States, according to the government reports for the 
year ending June 30, 1884, was in round numbers 
seventy-five million gallons of distilled spirits, five 
hundred and ninety gallons of malt liquors. 

"In taking a conscription in the spring of 1852, 
for a district of Western Prussia, out of one hundred 
and seventy-four young men only four were declared 
admissable by the reviewing army surgeons, the rest 
being physically incapacitated by the use of alco- 
hol." 

The brewers and liquor dealers of Zanesville, Ohio, 
lately petitioned the common council for permission 
to keep open saloons on Sunday between 12 and 6 
V. M. The question was submitted to the people, 
who promptly vetoed it by a vote of 2,674 to 1,189. 

The Catholic World says of the liquor traffic: "It 

calls for the giant power of the State, and the State 

s bound to protect us. Weighed side by side with 



this intolerable evil, the commercial interest of liq- 
uor makers and liquor venders swings like a feather 
in the scales." 

When the Republicans of Cincinnati nominated a 
candidate for county clerk lately, they set aside two 
sober citizens and selected the keeper of the most 
disreputable saloon in the city for the office. The 
very next night a murder was committed in the can- 
didate's saloon, while he was there drinking with his 
friends, his own drunkenness being the occasion of 
the crime. 

Phillips Brooks recently, at a Boston meeting 
said: "No word of mine shall ever be lifted up 
against fanaticism of any kind in the temperance 
cause. If there is any cause that justifies what ap- 
pears to be fanaticism, it is this cause. There is 
nothing more disgusting and disheartening than to 
hear ease-loving men, living selfish, luxurious lives, 
railing against temperance fanaticism." 

Recently gathered statistic show that in New 
York city 93 per cent of the inmates of the House 
of Industry were sent there for crimes resulting from 
the use of intoxicatiag liquors, while of the 8,000 
liquor sellers of the metropolis 6,438 have been con- 
fined in jail or prison. The ^'ccamiMer pointedly adds: 
"These jail-birds, before they are granted a license 
to make other criminals, have to be certified to as 
"respectable citizens." 

Fred Berkey, Jr., a son of one of the leading citi- 
zens of Salem, Ind., while intoxicated appeared on 
the streets and began an indiscriminate fusillade. 
He fired nine shots, aiming at whoever happened to 
be in range. Laura Klerner was shot twice, once in 
the wrist and once in the shoulder; William McClan- 
ahan was shot through the hand; W. S. Percise sus- 
tained a flesh wound in the thigh; Jordan Payne re- 
ceived a ball through the body just below the heart 
and will probably die. Payne, when shot, was in a 
buggy with a companion. Dragging Payne from the 
buggy, Berkey compelled the other man to drive on 
and attempted to escape. Finding this impossible 
he placed a pistol to his head and fired. The ball 
took effect and the 3'oung man died in fifteen min- 
utes. No cause is known for the bloody work ex- 
cept that Berkey was completely maddened b}' liquor. 

The privilege of selling beer on the grounds of 
the New York Agricultural Fair has been sold for 
fourteen hundred and seventy-five dollars. The 
privilege of keeping the "first dinning hall" brought 
only $110, and two other dining halls went for $90 
and !||i85. The three eating places are worth $285, 
and the lager-beer business $1,475. Probably the 
lascer-beer seller has the best bargain of the four, 
though he pays more than five times as much as the 
other three together. The fact is full of meaning, 
and we commend it to the thoughtful. The agricul- 
turists and their friends who attend fairs are prob- 
ably better than an average of the whole community 
Does the privilege of selling beer to the American 
people yield five times as much profit as the privilege 
of feeding them. The question suggests the vast 
money power of the "beer interest," aad the facts 
are most complimentary to us as a people. — lY. Y. 
Christian Advocate. 

Wine in the Congo Region. — 51r. H. M. Stanley, 
in his new work, "The Congo and its Free State," 
shows how wine is doing much to deteriorate the 
value of African territory in the eyes of Europeans. 
Many of the new settlers, he says, are accustomed to 
take their glass of wine at meal-time. What can the 
wine matter? the inexperienced ask pleadingly. Stan- 
ley answers: "Tome, personally, nothing. To you a 
sudden death, or perhaps a sun stroke. Should you 
recover you will blame Africa. 'Africa is cruel! 
Africa is murderous! Africa means death to the 
European?' And your stupid, unreflecting friend in 
Europe will echo the cry. Simply because a weak- 
ling like you could not resist your little glass at mid 
day, must all this continent be subjected to the 
scourge of your fault-finding powers?" 

Effect of Alcohol on Arteries. — Dr. Loomis, 
of New York, on presenting a case of aneurism to 
his class, made the following pointed statement 
touching the causative relation of alcohol in this ac- 
cident: A man can take two or three glasses of 
stimulants through the day as he may feel the inclin- 
ation, and he may continue this habit for perhaps 
twenty years without any evident harm accruing 
from it; but, when this man reaches that period of 
life when the vital powers are on the decline, he sud- 
denly feels himself old before his time, for he has all 
these years been laying the foundation of a chronic 
endoarteritis. I believe, gentlemen, that fifty per 
cent of all these diseases arise from the use of alco- 
holic stimulants. The more I see of disease the 
more I am convinced that, as a rule, a man is young 
just in proportion as his arteries are healthy, and old 
as thev are diseased. — H,alth and Home. 



■,#^ 



12 



THS CHSISTIAJ^ CYl^OSirRE. 



October 8, 1885 



ZITFUATrSE. 



Maxtai. of Co-operatiox. bein^ an epitome of Holvoake's 
"Histonr of Co-opi?ratiou.'" ArranseJ by the Sociologic Society 
of America, with an iutroductiou by George Jacob Holyoake. 
pp. TS. Price, cloth 30 ct*., paper 10 ot*. Johu B. Alderi, Xew 
Tork. 

Combination, com petition and co-opcratiou :\re the 
steps tliat mark the social progress of an enligbtoued 
people. The evils of the first, whether in the form 
of monied monopolies or secret conclaves are only 
too well known, but we have not yet come to the 
point of suppressing them. The second has been 
patronized as a remedy for the tirst. but is proving 
a failure uniformly. The last we yet look upon as a 
theory little tried and apt to be mistrusted. Eng- 
land has given the world instances of wonderful 
sucL-ess in business co-operation and this little work 
presents brieliy the theory and practice of societies 
organizeil and carried on upon this principle. "Co- 
operation." says Mr. Holyoake. ••means concert for 
the diffusion of wealth. It leaves nobody out who 
helps to produce it. It touches no man's fortune; it 
seeks no plunder: it causes no disturbance to society; 
it gives no trouble to statesmen: it euters into no se- 
cret asso<;iations: it needs no trades-union to protect 
its interest: it contemplates no violence; it subverts 
no order: it loses no dignity; it accepts no gift nor 
asks any favor: it keeps no terms with the idle and 
it will break no faith with the industrious." This 
book should be welcomed as a valuable contribution 
to the library of every workingman. Upon its prin- 
ciples we might do without hundreds of secret socie 
ties with their perpetual bickering and strikes. 

The EngJish llhtstrafed Mugazine opens a new vol- 
ume with the October number. Swinburne contrib- 
utes an opening poem. The illustrated papers are 
the first paper on •London Commons,' and ••Decayed 
Seaports," which include much of quiet English his- 
tory. ••Adventures on the Equator," is an account, 
by his father. Joseph Hatton. of Frank Hatton's 
joumeyings and discoveries in Borneo. The initia- 
tion of young Mr. Hatton in the Kinarahingan, or 
leading lodge among the natives of that tropical is- 
land, was republished some weeks ago in these col- 
umns from the Ctntury. 

The Library Magazine occupies a distinctive 
place in our periodical literature. Its aim is to pre- 
sent in an attractive form, and at a xevj moderate 
cost, the most valuable parts of the cun-ent foreign 
periodical writings of the day, with such original 
American papers as may be required to keep its 
readers abreast of our home thought. The plan of 
the magazine excludes fiction, but includes every 
other form of literature, it is, as its name imports, 
designed for preservation in libraries, as well as for 
mere temix)rary perusal. The October number con- 
tains, among others, the following papers : "AVhat 
can History Teach Us ?" by William S. Lilly; "3Iid- 
summer in the Soudan," by Gen. Sir Henry Brack- 
enbury: ••The Metaphysical Society," by R' H. Hut- 
ton; 'The Paris Newspaper Press," by Theodore 
Child: •■Leath and Afterwards," by Edwin Arnold; 
'•The Poor Collector," by P. G. Hamerton. There is 
also an exhaustive paper upon "The Greek Anthol- 
ogy." by the editor of Alden's Cydopedia of Univer- 
tol Literature. A separate department is entitled 
"Current Thought," in which the editor presents 
summaries of various essays of importance in Euro- 
pean and American periodicals. John B. Alden, 
publisher. New York. 

Vick'i Illustrated Monthly for October, with its 
handsome flower-piece and useful advice for the 
month on the vegetable and flower garden, tells us 
some interesting facts respecting the coca plant of 
South America, from which the powerful and useful 
drug, cocaine, is extracted. The leaf when chewed 
is a strong stimulant, and enable a person to endure 
long abstinence from food and great fatigue, but is 
injurious when taken to excess. 



The Chtjeches. 



— Dr.s. W. J. Reid, D. W. Carson, D. R. Kerr, and 
W. W. Barr, members of the Committee of Confer 
ence with the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Syn- 
od of the South, appointed at the last meeting of 
the U. P. General Assembly, attended that meeting 
at L»ue West, South Carolina, and were very kihdly 
received. The other member of the committee was 
Dr. J. T. Cooper of Pittsburgh. 

— At this Associate Reformed Synod, a resolution 
was passed inviting all the P.salm singing churches 
in the world to meet in a Pan-Psalmody Council, in 
Kampen, Holland, on the L5th of October, 1886, to 
unite their testimony to devise means to perpetuate the 
Psalms and to restore the lost ordinance to the Prot- 
estant churches. Revs. R. F. Bradley and E. L. 
Patton were elected delegates to the Council. 



—The Omaha Watchman concedes that the singing 
in Rev. E. B. Graham's United Presbyterian is the 
best of all the eleven churches in the city, and it is 
conducted without organ, fiddle, pipe, sackbut, psal- 
tery or harp, without which some well meaning 
people almost fear to join their voices in public wor- 
ship. 

— Major D. W. 'VMiittle, of Chicago, has been in- 
vited to conduct evangelistic meetings in Kansas 
during the remainder of the autumn and coming 
winter. He expects to commence his labors in the 
city of Lawrence this week. His many friends in 
this city will bear him on theh^ hearts to the throne 
of grace, in earnest prayer for the divine blessing 
to rest on his labors. It is hoped that Christian 
people, wherever he goes, will give him their hearty 
and earnest co-operation. 

— An invitation has been extended to Messrs. 
bloody and Sankey to conduct a series of meetings 
in Bridgeport. Conn., during the last week in Oc- 
tober. 

— The secular press informs us of the miraculous 
cure of Miss Ella Betts, of Nevada, 0. She had 
quick consumption, and sank very rapidly, and de- 
sired to join the church, but was assured that that 
would not save her. She was finally admitted to the 
Presbyterian communion, and the same night laj' as 
if dead three hours. About midnight she told her 
mother the Lord had saved her, and arose and asked 
for her clothes, dressed herself, and played on the or- 
gan. Ever since she has grown stronger, and ap- 
pears nearly as well as ever. 

— The papers that come from Bolivia show the 
whole country is ripe for the Gospel, and that not- 
withstanding all the opposition on the part of the 
clergy, there are everywhere men ready ,and willing 
to accept the Gospel and defend it. 

— The mission of the primitive Methodists on the 
Island Fernando Po, West Africa, has been instru- 
mental in civilizing and Christianizing the people. 
A new governor, however, through the influence of 
Jesuit priests, is interrupting the educational work 
of the Christian missionaries. 

— Mr. Kirias, the Albanian colporteur, in Bulgaria, 
who had been captured by the brigands and a heavy price 
set for his ransom, has at last been released. It is 
said that a ransom was paid for him by friends, 
aided bj^ the British and Foreign Bible Society 
amounting to about 700 liras, or $3,000. The peril 
from the brigands in some parts of European Tur- 
key is very great, and the work of our missionaries 
is hindered on that account. 

— In the Transvaal, Africa, the Wesleyans have 
been favored during the year with gracious spiritual 
seasons. On New Year's they beheld a scene never 
witnessed before in any English church in the Trans- 
vaal — eleven young people kneeling round the com- 
taunion rails earnestly seeking the Saviour. The na- 
tive service was rather polyglot. One missionary 
preached in English; another translated it into 
Dutch, and a native evangelist told it again in Sira- 
long, making the service a trilingual one. 

— The church missionary society is able to report 
a large increase in the number of men offedng them- 
selves for service in the missionary field. Eighteen 
have been accepted for immediate service, including 
among the number eight University graduates. This 
society also receives men for training for missionary 
service, and twenty-six persons have been accepted 
for this purpose. May missionary revivals like this, 
which has brought forward so many candidates for 
service in foreign lands, be experienced in this coun- 
tr}' as well as in England! — Northern Christian Advo- 
cate. 

— Camp meetings are being held at several points 
in Florida, and are attended by unusual numbers. 
Many conversions are reported, and much interest 
is manifested by all classes. 

— St Clement's Protestant church, Philadelphia, 
has a guild of the Iron Cross for workingmen, the 
members pledging themselves against blasphemy, 
intemperance, and unchastity. 

■ — The Rev. John F. Goncher, of Baltimore, is 
supporting many schools in Japan, China and India, 
for the benefit of which he will place in the treasury 
of the Methodist Missionary Society this year 
$1.3,000. 

—Of the 43,402,970 whites in the United States, 
21,602,687, or about one-half, are either foreign 
born or children of parents of foreign birth. The 
Lutlierari Ohaerver says that about one-half of them 
come from lands holding the Lutheran faith. 

— The services conducted by E. W. Bliss, evange- 
list, at the tent on Union Park street, Boston, for 
the last two months, have attracted large numbers, 
especially of those usually called non-church-goers, 
with whom they seem to have been very popular. 



At the close of the services a large number remained 
to give in their names as having received especial 
benefit from these meetings. 

— The Baptists have already become (piite numer- 
ous and influential in some parts of. Australia. Quite 
recently the Home Mission Societj' of the denomi- 
nation held its annual meeting in the town hall, 
3Ielbourne, when 1,200 sat down to tea. The public 
meeting held afterward was attended by 2,500 per- 
sons. 

— The ILmlandet s,ays : "The first 'Christian ser- 
mon' in America, in the tongue of our forefathers, 
was hold by Bishop Jon, who arrived in America 
(Vineland) from Iceland in 1059 and sufl'ered a mar- 
tyr's death. Greenland's first bishop, Erik, arrived 
here in 1121. He .also found his death in this coun- 
try. After Erik's leave Bishop ffizur of Lund, 
Skane, Sweden, ordained a learned priest, Arnold, 
as Bishop of Greenkand. He was su'iceeded in 1150 
by Bish(»p Jonas Knut (Canute). We know at pres- 
ent the names of 17 bishops who have been in Green- 
laud previous to 1410, and of those several visited 
the colonies of the Northmen (Nordma^nnen) in 
America. 

— The seventy-fifth annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Board will be held in Boston on Oct. 1,3-16. 
The sermon will lie preached by Rev. Dr. Walker, of 
Hartford, and an address will be delivered by Rev. 
Dr. Storrs, of Brookl3'n. Short addresses are ex- 
pected from representatives of the churches connect- 
ed in past years with the American Board. 

— The first regularly appointed missionary among 
the Jews of Chicago, the Rev. S. D. Berger, will be 
ordained as a Gospel minister at Gr.ace English Luth- 
eran church to-morrow at 7:30 o'clock p. M. This 
gentleman is a native of Austria, and speaks the 
Hebrew tongue as a mother tongue, but has had the 
best opportunities in Europe and some in America 
to fit himself to preach Christ among his people. 

— The Moravian missjonaries among the aborigi- 
nes of Australia say the "eventide" of their work is 
approaching. The blacks will soon be extinct. But 
in view of this fact, they increase their effin-ts, that 
the departing race may know and trust in Christ. 

— ^When the American Board commenced its mis- 
sion work among the Dakota Indians they only num- 
bered 25,000; now they are over 40,000. Then they 
were degraded heathen, without a written language, 
which the missionaries gave them. Last year 117 
new members were received into their churches. 

— The greatest single power in London yet is 
Charles H. Spurgeon. He is an omnibus in himself 
and full as ever. His pulpit rings with the same old 
fearless, faithful Gospel; his fertile brain is organ- 
izing new orphanages, and city missions and other 
efiective agencies for bodies and souls. It is not 
too much to say that Mr. Spurgeon has accomplished 
as much for the moral welfare of London as the 
whole Salvation Army combined; and the good he 
has done requires no subtraction for indiscretions or 
infelicities of doctrine or methods. He went into 
Scotland last week for a short vacation; and for 
old friendship's sake I agreed to preach for his peo- 
ple. The Sabbath was very hot for this northern 
latitude, and the sight of that vast multitude from 
the very lofty pulpit (or balcony rather,) was enough 
to make a man's head swim. The three hymns were 
sung with a volume of voice that came surging up 
around the pulpit like a miniature Niagara. — T. L. 
Cuyler in the Independent. 



LODGE NOTES. 



— At the late Grand Lodge of Illinois Good Templars 
one-half of the delegates had to take the Grand Lodge 
degree, in order to participate in the business. Thirty 
lodges have gone down the past year. 

— The Texas Freemason, speaking of New York, says, 
"The male population of the State was 2,505,322 when 
the last census was taken, about one in every thirty-five 
of the male inhabitants of all ages is a Mason, or not far 
from one in every ten of adult males." 

— The Detroit Freemason being asked if Governor 
Alger, of Michigan is a Mason replies; "He is an En- 
tered Apprentice Mason. He bad taken the first degree 
when the war br. ke out and he went to do battle for his 
c luntry. He has not taken any other degree since, owing 
to business and other causes." This is a good answer, 
the words "other causes" covering up any amount of dis- 
gust no doubt at the deception practiced on him. 

— The Knights of Labor, which is a powerful organi- 
zation in the suburbs of So. Chicago, is pushing -John Fitz- 
gerald, of the car .shops, for the position of school trus- 
tee. This is an open attempt to accomplish what Masons 
are all the while doing in secret. 

— Frank M, Bristol, a Methodist preacher of this city, 
was lately reported as a Mason of high degree in the In- 
ter Ocean, the same paper says he was made a Knight 
Templar in Apollo Commandery last week. 



l^Vff^'WVI 



October 8, 1885 



THE CFRISTIAN CYNOSTJKE. 



13 



— The Home Circle is a new beneficiary 
organization, having in Chicago 225 mem- 
bers in four lodges, viz. : the Union, Chi- 
cago.Calumet.and Crescent The Chicago 
lodges of the order wish the recognition 
of the supreme body, though not regu- 
larly entitled to representation in that 
body until they tliemselves are 1,000 
strong, large enough to form a grand 
ledge. The Supreme Lodge meets in 
Bost.jn, Oct 13th. 

— The annual meeting of the Royal 
Order of Scotland was held in Boston last 
week. Says the Detroit Freemason, "In 
the absence of 111. Bro. Albert Pike, Pro- 
vincial Grand Master, the Deputy III. Bro. 
Josiah H. Drummond presided The us- 
ual business was transacted, four deaths 
reported, and a number of new members 
received. The business concluded with 
the annual banqaet, at whicii the wives 
and daughters of the members were pres- 
ent. The next •meeting will be held in 
the city of Washington, D. C." 



SECKET 



SOCIETIES 
TR.ATKX). 



ILl^US- 



To any of our readers, the editor of 
Buds and Blossoms and Friendly Oreet 
ings, I. F. Avery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
offers during the next month to send a 
free sample copy, in hope that its worth 
will invite continuance. 

The object of the National Letter Re- 
turn Association of Chicago is, to afford 
everybody the same facility for the prompt 
return of non delivered letters, that busi- 
ness men enjoy who have "return request" 
printed on ttieir envelopes. 

It is not convenient for commercial, 
and other travelers to carry a supply of 
printed envelopes; nor for persons send- 
ing but few letters to have their name 
and address printed on their envelopes. 
They do not purchase envelopes in quan- 
tities to justify the expense of priniing — 
yet the return of their letters when n in- 
delivered is as desirable to them as it is 
to those sending a number of letters. 

Persons sending few letters are more li- 
able to error in mis-directing than busi- 
ness men who send many letters. 

To thesfe and all others the Association 
secures the safe return of letters by a plain 
and simple method. For $1 there will be 
sent 1,000 gummed stamps to be put on 
each envelope, which will secure the re- 
turn of the letter. 

The will of Robert R. Mcllvain, a rich 
New Yorker who died in 1881, bequeathed 
his books and pamphlets and .f 10,000 to 
found a public library from which all 
trashy books and papers were to be ex- 
cluded. 

The health department of Chicago has 
begun prosecutions against twenty-eight 
milkmen whose merchandise was recently 
rated by Professor Long as "skimmed," 
"bad skimmed," or watered." 

The law department of Yale College 
opened Oct. 1st. One of the new stu- 
dents is Miss Alice B. Jordan, of Jlichi- 
gan, a graduate of Michigan' University, 
and already an attorney at law. She has 
the honor of being the first female who 
ever attended the law or any other de- 
partment of the college. 

In 1881 Paul Broder, a wealthy college 
professor of Beloit, Wis., died from what 
was supposed to be the effects of falling 
down stairs. Recently relatives took the 
matter up, and a coroner's inquest was 
held at Janesville, the jury returning a 
verdict that Prof. Broder had been mur- 
dered. 



DON'T YOU THINK 

That you can send in a club op six 
or more trial subscribers at twenty- 
five cents each? We continue the 
offer of eight numbers of the Chris- 
tian Cynosure to any address for 25 
cents. 



"THE WHOLE IS SETTEE THAN A PART," 

AND YOU HAVE IT HERE IN A 

"NUT-SHELL." 



CoutainluF ttie signs, erfps, passwords, emblems, etc. 
of Freemasonry (Blue todgeand totlie fourteemh de- 
gree of tlie York rite). Adoptive M-tsom-y, Revised 
Odd-fellowsliip, Good Teinplarism, the Temple of 
Honor the United Sons of Industry. Knights of Pyth- 
laspndrhe Grange. with affidavits, etc. Over2.50euts, 
99_pages, paper cover. Price, ■'a cents ; 82.00 per dozen. 

For sale by the National Ciiri'Uisun Associa- 
tion, at tiead-qaarters for Anti-Secrecy 
literature. 331 W. Bladisou St. Cliica£o. 



THE PUBLIC 



ARE INVITED TO SPEND 

ONE 

CENT 

FOR 

The Chicago Sun 

To-morrow if nothing more out of 
curiosity to see how much news they 
can get for a penny. 

THE CHICAGO SUN is a 4-page 
daih-, except Saturdays and Sundays, 
when it will consist of not less than 
8 pages, and is sold for the uniform 
price of ONE CENT. 

It is a daily paper for the people 
in every sense of th(3 word. 



TRY IT! 



ASK YOUR NEWSBOY FOR IT ! 

Delivered to any address at the 
low price of 10 cents per week, Sun- 
day included. 



The Ohicago ^nn. 

Price ONE CENT 
EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR. 



THE AMERICAN 

Building Association News. 

MONTHLY. $1 PER YEAE. 

LEADING TAPER OF THIS GROWING INTER- 
EST IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Address J. T. S UTOE, Editor, 221 W. Madison 
St , Chicago. 

Wrigley's "How to Manage Building Associations." 
price S2, 'The Bull ing Societies Chart." 81, and oth- 
er building as-ociation literature, for sale. 

liuildiiig Associations are Savings Banks for 
the poor, who can draw money from them to build 
homes The rich find in them a safe investment and 
realize compound interest. They are uniting labor 
andcanital and encouraging economy and thrift ai no 
other institution of the present day. 



KNIGHTS OF J~Y TRIAS IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

By a Past Chancellor. A full illustrated exposition 
of the three ranks of the order, with the addition of 
the "Amended, Perfected .and Amplified Third 
Kank." The lodge-room, signs, countersigns, grips, 
etc., are shown l)y engravings. 25 cents each; per 
dozen, 82.00. Address the 

N.ATIONAL ''UIRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 
tSU W. MiOisoH St.. ChioasS 




DR. PEIRO basdcvotedZSyearstothespecialtreatmentof Catarrh, 
Throat, Lung Diseases, tounderotthe Am. Oxygen Co., for the pro- 
due tionotthat wond'-rtul remedy ,ujed by Inhalation, so widely known as the 

OXYGEN TREATMENT 

T^v the rohct and cuie of Consumption, Bronchitis, Asthma, 
Hay Fever, Catarrh, Nervous, Prostration, etc. Send stamp 
i"j me Manual," an intcrestin;,' book or 120 paiies Four Colored. 
Plates. Address DR. PEIRO, Chicago Opera House, [''ark and 
v\ . , < I er hy permission to a few of our pi trons : [WasLlnglon 8ts.,cmCAG0, ILL. 
Hon. Wm. Penn Nixon, Ed. IteiOean, - - Chicago. 

F. H. Tubbs, Esq., Manat-er W U.Tel. Co., . Chlcag'o. 

Cen. C. H. Howard, Mrs. T. B. Carse, - - Chicago. 

O .W. Nixon, M. D., Mrs. Netta C. Rood, = Chicago. 

Henry R. Stiles, M. D.. _ - - - NewYork. 

N Ji.—Otir Oxygf-n is sifely sfnt anywhere in the United States, Canada 
or Europe hy Express, Easy, plaiji, complete directions utith each i,reatment. 



Special Inducements 

To Christian Workers in the United 
Stages, 



Bagster's Bibles Cheaper than Ever, 

Boun'i in French Morocco, protecting edges, elastic 
bandx, etc. 

No. I. Smallest size ?1 00 

No. II. Medluiu size 150 

No. III. Larae size 2 75 

For a short time we will mall to parties In the 
United States these Bibles at the following Special 

DiSCOULtS. 

No. I For 70c. No. II For$l 10 

No. Ill Forsi 90 

Better Binding of Bagster's and Oxford Bibles 
at Corresponding Discounts. 

Complete Bible Catalogue sent free on application 




Bagster's Pictorial Bible. 

This Bible Is specially prepared for Mothers, S. S. 
Teachers of the smaller Classes, and Children. Well 
bound, good clear ruby type, with a large number of 
Outline Illustrations and Maps. Size, 6x4x1 1-4 in. 

Price, Roan Leather, round corners SI 00 

Turkey Morocco, elegant 2 00 

DISCOUNT, 30 Percent. 

Sent, postpaid, on receipt of price. 

S. R. BRIGGS, 

Toronto Willard Tract Depository, 
TORONTO, CANADA. 

A. Skin of Beauty is a Joy Fore-ver. 
DR. T. FELIX GOTTRAUD'S 

OEIENTAL CREAM, or MAGICAL 
BEAUTIFIER. 

PURIFIES as well as BEAUTIFIES the 
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stood the test 
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and is 80 harm- 
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to be sure the 
preparation is 
properly made 
Accept no 
counterfeit of 
similar name. 
The distin- 

guishedDr.L. 

ATsayre, saiu to a lady of the hautton (a patient): 
"As you ladles will use them. I recommend 'Gpur- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of all the Skin 
preparations." One bottle will last six months, using 
It every day. Also Poudre Subtile removes superflu- 
ous hair without Injury to the skin. Mme. M. B. T. 
GOUKAUD, Sole Proprietor, 48 Bond St., New York. 
For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers 
thiouKhout the United States, Canadas, and Europe. 
B^-Beware of base imitations. 81,000 Reward for ar- 
rest and proof of any one selling the same. 



MARKET REPORTS. 

CHICAGO. 

Wteat— No.a. 841^ @85 

No. 3 ~~i'^A 

Winter No 2 90}^ 

Corn— No. 2 41^ 43 

Oats— No.2 26 

Rve-No. 2 593^ 

Bi-an per ton 13 00 

Flour. 1 7.5 @.5 00 

Hay— Timothy 8 00 @15 00 

Mess pork per bbl 8 1.5 

Butter, medium to best 11 @32 

Cheese 05 @10 

Beans 1 15 @1 30 

Ee;Ks 17^ 

Seeds— Timothy 1 65 @1 75 

Flax 131 

Broom corn.. 03 @ 06 

Hides— Green t <3 ry flint 073^ @ 14 

Lumber— Common 11 00 @18 00 

Wool 14 (a2S 

Cattle— Choice to extra 5 30 @4 90 

Common to good 2 25 @5 65 

Hogs 3 00 @4 15 

Sheep. 2 75 @4 00 

NEW YORK. 

Flour 3 00 @5 35 

Wheat— Winter 93^ @1 01 

Spring 93% 

Corn.........! 48 @49 

Oats 30 (a-40 

MessPork 9 95 

Eggs- }fi 

Butter 8 ^3 

Wool 13 @37 

KANSAS CITY. 

attle 3 60 @5 40 

oee 3 65 0-4 85 

beep 150 ®3 00 




DR. CONANT'S 

GompoundVapGrBatlis 

Pur home use. 
Positive protection 
against Cholera, Malaria 
Fevers, and kindred ills 
demon-^trated daily at 
226 State St., Chicago. 
Ladies— Room 5. 

Gents — Room 6. 
Call or send for circular. 



Hallelujah and Victory! 

SiNO THE Songs of Eefokm at home, in thb 

FIELD, IN THE SHOP, IN THE CONVENTION— SING 
THEM TILL THE DAY OF TEIUMPH COMES. 

CLARK'S REFORM SONG BOOK; 
by George W. Clark, the "Liberty Slnper" of AbolV- 
tlon fame, who has complied a new book for the new 
movement. Here are- 
Songs for temperance. 

Songs for the good and true. 

Songs for freemen. 

Songs for the home. 

Songs for the devotional meeting. 

Songs for reform meetings. 

Songs that will vanquish the lodge. 

SING THEM! 

HAVE TOUR CHILDREN SING THEM! 

Price In boards, postpaid, 40 cents. In cloth, wfth 
portrait on steel, 55 cents. 

Send to the NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSGC^ A 
TION, 221 "W. Madison St.. Chicago. III. 



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Splendid Domestic Stories ! 

bv Marlon Harlaiirt, Mary Abbott Rand, Hel- 
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"Scribbler's Letters to Gustavus;"arich feast of wit, 
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A page devoted e.x:clusively 
to the care of infants anil 
young children. Filleil with 
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How to prepare delicacies suitable for af- 
ternoon teas, or small evenin.: companies, 
that are not too expensive, The Home 
Cooking p.a<je, with its helps and hints, is 
invaluable to every practical housekeeper. 

MTJ.SIC,-VI.. STUDIES, by Margaret B. Harvey, 
are popular and he pful to beginners in music. 

FLOKAl. I>EP.i.3ITMEXT, illustrated and 
carefu Iv edited bv Eben E. Kexford. Letters from 
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14 



THE CHHISTrAB* CrN'OSnB:EJ. 



October 8, 1885 



HOME AND HEALTH. 



SALT AS A DESTROYER OF THE TEETH. 

At a recent meeting of the New York 
Odontological Society. Dr. E. Parmly 
Brown said: 

I will venture the assertion that the ex 
cessive use of common salt is one of the 
main factors in the destruction of human 
teeth to day. I am now engaged in col- 
lecting some statistics on this point, from 
which I hope ia time to demonstrate, 
what seems to me to be the fact, that com- 
mon salt excessively used is a great solv- 
ent of the human teeth. If it will injure 
the teeth through the chemistry of our 
systems in some way or other that I will 
not attempt to e.xplaio to nisht. why might 
it not also h..ve the effect of preventing 
a good devtl'ipuient of the teeth when 
taken into the system in excess? I have 
lately procured some statistics from the 
Sandwich Islands, from a gentleman who 
has been there covering a period of over 
forty years, that are very suggestive and 
interesting. Within that period the teeth 
of the Sandwich Islanders have decayed 
rapidly, and since they have begun to de- 
cay it has been noticed that the natives 
are in the habit of biting off great chunks 
of salt and eating it with their food. Ac- 
cording to all accounts, the teeth of the 
Sandwich Islanders were formerly the 
most free from decay of any people on 
the face of the earth, if I remember 
rightly. You will find that people who 
eat a great deal of salt and a great deal 
of sugar are often entirely toothless. I 
know several instances of candy store- 
keepers where three generations are en- 
tirely toothless. People who eat an ex- 
cessive amount of salt are tempted to eat 
large quantities of candy, pickles and 
vinegar. There seems to be a craving for 
those substances after the excessive use 
of salt. 

WHOOPIXG COrGH. 

Dr. C. R. lUingworth writes in the 
Lancft: " I have found a popular reme- 
dy very efficacious in the treatment of 
whooping cough. I refer to picked oak- 
um, worn by the patient either round the 
neck in muslin or on the chest as a pad 
stitched to the underclothing. Locally I 
apply the glycerine of tannic acid with a 
laryngeal brush two or three times a day, 
and internally I prescribe one, two, or 
three-grain doses of chloral, one, two or 
three minims of belladonna, one grain of 
allum, and one minim of carbolic acid, 
in sirup, every two or three hours. A lin- 
irteat of turpentine, acetic acid and yolk 
of egg is ac excellent application for the 
chest, neck and back, night and morning 
with the liniment of belladonna added in 
the proportion of one to seven. In chil- 
dren of two years or more, I have applied 
carbolic acid and glycerine, in the propor- 
tion of 1 to 1.5, to the larynx, with suc- 
cess, each application checking a parox- 
ysm at once. With the above mentioned 
treatment I cure the worst cases in from 
seven to ten days." 

AN IDEA IN FRUIT DRYING. 

The use of oil stoves is becoming very 
common. They may be made to do good 
service in drying fruit, of which, in some 
sections, there is a large excess this year. 
Whoever burns hard coal (anthracite) 
knows what a coal-sifter is. The simplest 
form is a square box of half inch stuff, 
with a coarse wire-cloth bottom, and no 
top. The wire cloth should be of galvan- 
ized iron, and have about four squares to 
the inch. The sides of the box are about 
three inches high, and ills about fourteen 
inches square. These boxes are easily 
made, the wire being attached by strips, 
nailed to the edges of the frame. Fruit 
laid upon the wire in the boxes, and sev- 
eral boxes piled evenly one upon the oth- 
er, may be quickly dried by placing the 
stack thus made upon an oilstove. The 
heat must be equalized by an iron plate 
laid above the flame, which must be kept 
low. The lowermost box needs to be re- 
moved and placed on top every now and 
then, special care being taken not to 
cook the fruit. The drying will thus go 
on entirely under control, and almost as 
rapidly as in the patent dryers. For large 
quantities a pitent dryer may be used. — 
American AgricvUurist. 

INSOLUBLE CEMENT GLUE. 

In order to render glue insoluble in 
water, even hot water, it is only necessary 
when dissolving for use, to add a little 
potas.sium bichromate to the water and 
expose the glued part to the light. The 
proportion of bichromate will vary with 



circumstances, but for most purposes 
about one-fiftieth of the amount of glins.- 
will sulfice. — Scientific American. 

MOSQUITO OIL. 

The Angler vouches for the effective- 
ness of the following mixture for keeping 
off mosquitoes: 

R— Olive oil 3 parts. 

Oil of peiinaroval 2 '^ 

Glyi-eriiie " 1 " 

Ammonia 1 " 

To be well shaken before applying to 
the face and hands. Avoid getting the 
mixture into the eyes. 

Mrs. Anne Burgess, wife of James 
Burgess, of ForestviUe, Md., a suburb of 
Washington, to facilitate the kindling of 
a fire poured coal oil in it from a can. It 
immediately exploded, throwing the burn- 
ing fluid all over her. She ran out of the 
house crying fur help, and when found 
was entirely naked and prostrate upon 
the gioiiud, literally roa.?ted alive and 
writhing in the greatest agony. Dr. Tor- 
rey was promptly called but could afford 
no relief whatever. She died after twelve 
hours of the most terrible suffering. In 
a few days she would have become a 
mother. 

HOBSFOED'S ACID PHOSPHATE. 

The Horsford Almanac and Cook-Book 
mailed free on application to the Ruinford 
Chemical Works, JProvidence, R. I. 



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To Snnday-SchootB, per quarter 3ctB. 

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We give below a list of papers which 
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reduced rates: 
The Cynosure and — 

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The American ( Washington) 2 50 

Western Rural 3 00 

The Missionary Review 3 00 

Christiao Herald (N. Y) 3 75 

The Truth (St. Louis) 3 50 

Illustrated Christian Weekly 3' 90 

New York Witness 3 50 

Union Signal 3 00 

Christian Statesman (Phila. ) 3 .50 

The Interior 3 85 

The Independent 4 25 

The S. S. Times 3 .50 

Gospel inall Lands 3 .50 

The Nation 4 .50 

New York Tribune, Weekly 3 .50 

Chicago Tribune, Weekly 2 .50 

Chicago Inter Ocean, Weekly 3 50 

Harper's Magazine 4 75 

North A raerican Review 5 75 

The Centur)- 5 35 

Scientific American 4 25 

Buds and Blossoms 3 10 

Pansy 2 35 

Viok's Magazine 3 .50 

American Agriculturist 3 60 

If any complaints arise in regard to 
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MANUFACTURERS OF 

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IT COIVTA.IIIFS : 

1, Common version of the lesson text arranged for 
responsive leading; memory verses in bracliets. 3, 
Revised version of the text. 3. Golden Text; Central 
Truth; Topic, and Outline, arranged as a responsive 
exercise. 4. Ilome Readings. 5. Introductory, in- 
cluding Review Questions; Connecting Links, and 
Opening Remarks. 6. Lesson Dictionary, containing 
the time; places; per.sons, and contemporaries of the 
lesson, with the proper pronounciation of the names, 
and places. 7. Notes and explanations. 8. Questions. 

9. Review Exercises for the whole school in concert. 

10. Next Sunday's f^esson, including reference to 
memory verses and Golden Text. Conveniently ar- 
ranged, and tastily printed. 

Be sure and see this leaf before you order for next 
quarter. Price, $7.20 per 100 copies, per year. Address 

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I'KEEMASONRY 

A.T .A. CSJ-LA-IsrOEI. 

BY 

Pa^t Master of Keystone r.o<lgfe, 

IVo. (i.'Sn, €Iiicag». 

Illnsf rates every sitos, grip and ceremony of the 
Lodge and gives a brief explanation of each. This 
work should be scattereil like leaves all over the 
country. It is so cheap that it can be used as 
tractH, and money thus expended will bring a boun- 
tiful harvest. 32 pages. Piiee, postpaid, H cents. 
Per ifjo. f;i.60. Address. 

National Christian Association, 

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BIRNEY. 

The sketch of JAMES G. BIRNEY, 
candidate of the Liberty Party for Presi- 
dent, in pamphlet for 25 cents. A limit- 
ed number of copies of this handsome 
pamphlet for sale at the N. C. A. office. 

MASONIC OATHS, 

BY 

Past Master of Kej'stouc ]L.o(le;e, 
Tio. OSO, Chieago. 

A masterly discussion of the Oaths of the Masonic 
Lodfjc, to which is appended "Freemasonry at a 
Glance," illustrating every sign, grip ond cere- 
mony of the Masonic Lodge. This work is highly 
commended by leading lecturers as furnishing the 
best arguments on the nature and actual charac- 
ter of Masonic obligations of any tiook in print. 
Paper cover, 207 pages. Price, 4U cents. 

National Christian Association, 

331 West Madison St. Cbi«ag:«>, fll. 

REVISED ODD-FELL WSHIP 
ILLUSTRATED. 

The coiiylete revised ritual of the Lodge, Encamn- 
nientandKebckahdadlcf') degrees, profusely illustra- 
ted, an.l guaranteed to be strictly accurate; with a 
ekcti'ii c.ftlic origin, history and charactcroftheorder 
over om. hundred fooi-notc riuotatlonsfrom standa;-d 
authonllcs, showing the cliaradcr and teachings of 
the^ order, and an nnalvsls of rarh degree by President 
.J. rilanchard. The rliual coni'sponils exactly with 
the"Charge Books" furniBlied by the Sovereign Grand 
Lodge, In cloth, si.ijo; per dozen, 88.00. Paper cove ■. 
. '; cenfs: per dozen 84. 0(1. 

All orders promptly tilled by the 
NATIONAL CHRI.STIAN ASSOCIATION. 
881 W. Madigoa street, C/hl<oa£o> 



October 8, 1885 



T£3E CHRISTIAN CYNOSimE. 



15 



FAKM NOTES. 



HINTS ON DESTROYING WEEDS. 

Much of the effort in weed destruction 
is so widely misdirected that it is not 
nearly so effective as it should be. We 
often see advice to cut out plantain or 
wild carrot by hand, in meadows or past- 
ures. This is well enough where the 
plants are scattering, and should always 
be done if it is not possible or convenient 
to plow the weeds under. But cutting by 
hand does very little to clean the land of 
such foul pests. For every plant that ap- 
pears in meadow or pasture there are, 
probably a thousand seeds lying dormant 
in the ground ready to grow as soon as 
the soil is stirred. With a hoed crop on 
weed seed land, millions of weeds may 
be destroyed by frequent cultivation, in a 
single season. 

There are other classes of weeds which 
appear in winter grain which can also be 
best fought by well directed use of the 
plow. Red root, where the land is thor- 
oughly seeded with it, will appear in such 
quantities that hand pulling is impossible. 
We probably cannot destroy much of this 
weed by hoed crops in summer. We have 
seen it appear by the thousands on land 
that had been well cultivated in corn and 
potatoes during the summer, and sown to 
winter wheat in the fall. It is probably 
the nature of red root seed not to grow 
until the cool, moist weather which usu- 
ally comes just at wheat-seeding time. 
Hence the seeds brought to the surface 
during the heat of summer do not germ- 
inate and are not destroyed. But fall 
plow this land at the proper time for 
winter wheat sowing, and the red-root 
will all grow where it is near enough to 
the surface to germinate. Then plow in 
spring for oats or barley, and a large share 
of the-red-root will be destroyed. 

So far as possible horse labor should be 
utilized in the destruction of weeds. If 
much is done by hand labor or hoe it is 
evidence of mismanagement. It makes 
farming more expensive than it need be 
and in doing this makes good farming 
more difficult. In the parable about the 
husbandman's field, in which the enemy 
sowed tares, it was possibly the best that 
could then be done "to let both grow to- 
gether until the harvest." But he would 
scarcely now be considered a good farmer 
who would knowingly put a crop on land 
where it was sure to be crowded by weeds 
that could not be removed except by its 
own destruction. — American Oultivator. 

The American Dairyman says: Let a 
drop of fresh milk fall into a drop of pure 
water. If the milk promptly dissemin- 
ates itself through the water, the cow that 
yielded that milk is not with calf, but if 
it sinks to the bottom of the glass as it 
falls upon the water, and does not pro- 
duce but little of a milky cloud, the cow 
is pregnant. The specific gravity and 
viscidity of the albuminous milk being 
heavier than water, thus retains the drop 
of milk and causes it to sink. We ad- 
vise dairymen to make a note of this and 
give it a test. If reliable, the informa- 
tion may be of great value to them. 

C. M. Weed says in the Philadelphia 
Press that to keep flies out of the stable 
nothing is better than soft soap and car- 
bolic acid thrown on the floor once or 
twice a day. The mixture may be made 
of crude carbolic acid, which can be ob- 
tained very cheap, and orainary soft soap. 
The amount of the acid depends upon 
the strength of the soap. This can be 
easily told by pouring the two together 
and letting them stand, after thoroughly 
mixing, for an hour or two. Then mix a 
little with soft water. If too much acid 
is present, it will be shown by particles of 
oil floating on the surface. Two or three 
tablespoonfuls of acid to a quart of soap 
will usually sufHce. 




LIBIS, A.I2, Y 



"T/ie Broken, Se.aV'> 

"The Master's Carpet." 

"In the Coils, or The Coming Conflict." 

"The Character, Claim.s and Practical Work- 
ings of Freeniaso7iry ," by Pres. C. G. Finney. 

'■'Jievised Odd-fellowship;" the secrets, to 
getlier with a discussion of the character oi 
the order. 

"Freemasonry Illustrated;" the secrets of 
first seven degrees, together with a discussion 
of their character. 

"' Sermons and Addresses on Secret Societies;" 
a valuable collection of the best arguments 
against secret orders from Revs. Cross, Wil- 
liams, McNary, Dow, Sarver, Drury, Prof. J. 
G. Carson, and Prests. George and Blanchard. 



FOB SALE BY THE 

National Christian Associat'n 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

i. complete Oataloeue iieBt tree on Application, 

In the Coils; or, the Coming: ConfliJt. 

By "A Fanatic." A historical Bketch, by a United 
Presbyterian minister, vividly portrayins; the work- 
ings ol Secretism in the various relations of every- 
day life, and showing how individual domestic, 
social, religions, professional and public life are 
trammeled and biased by the baneful workings of 
the lodge. Being presented in the form of a story, 
this volume will interest both old and young, and 
the moral of the story will not have to be searched 
for. $1.50 each; $15.00 per dozen. 

Holden "With Cords. Or. tue Power ov 
THE Secret Empire. A faithful representation in 
story of the evil influence of Freemasonry, by E. 
E. Flagg, Author of "Little People," "A Sunny 
Life," Etc. This is a thrillingly interesting story ac- 
curately true to life because, mainly a narration of 
historical facts. In cloth $1.00; paper 50cent3. In 

t^inney on. Masonry. The character, clai os 
sad practical workings of Freemasonry. By Preot. 
Charles Q. Finney, of Oberlin College. President 
Finney was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge 
when he became a Christian. This book has openec 
the eyes of jnultltudes. In cloth, 'i'5 cent..; pei 
aozen, $7 BO. Paper cover, Rb cents; per dozan. 

TPbe Broken Seal; or Personal Reminiscence^ 
ot the Abduction and Murder of Capt, Wm, Morgan. 
By Samuel D Greene. One of the most interesting 
books ever published. In cloth, 75 cents, per dozen, 
Ift BO,. Pape^ covers. 40 cents; per dozen, $.3.50 

Secret. Societies, Ancient and Modbrn. 

A bock of great Interest to ofiicers of the army and 
navy, the bench and the clergy. Tablb of Con 
TENTS' The .inttqulty of Secret Societies, 'Xhe Life 
of Julian, The Eleuslnlan Mysteries, The Origin of 
Masonry, Was Washington a Mason? Fillmore and 
Webster's Deference to Masonry, i _ jJrtef Outline of 
the Frogresfi of Mason-y In the United States, The 
Tammany Ring, Masonic Benevolence, the Usee of 
Masomy, An Illustration. The Conclusion 60 cents 
sach ! oer dozen, $4,75. 

Ex-President John Gmr,c;r Adams* 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obliga- 
tions and Penalties. Thirty most interesting, able 
and convincing letters on the above general subject, 
written by this renowned statesman to different pub- 
lic men of the United States during the years 1831 
to 1833. With Mr. Adams' address to the pec.ile of 
Massachusetts upon political aspects of lodgery; an 
Appendix giving obligations of Masonry, and an able 
Introduction. This is one of the most telling anti- 
secrecy works extant, aside from the Expositions. 
Price, cloth, $1.00; per dozen, $9.00. Paper. 3£ 
cents; oer dozen, $3.50. 

aeneral Washington Opposed to Se- 
CRET Soci-KTiES. Thls is a republication of Gover- 
nor Joseph Eitner's '^Vindication of General 
Washington f.-om the Stigma of Adherence ic 
Secret Societies,''^ communicated to the House of 
Representatives of Pennsylvania, March 8th, 1837', 
at their special request. To this Is added the fact 
that three high Masons were the only persons who 
opposed a vote of thanks to Washington on his re 
tlrementto private life— undoubtedly because they 
considered him a seceding Freemason. 10 cents 
each; per dozen, 75 cents. 

College Secret Societies. Their customs, 
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H. L. Kellogg, Containing the opinion of many 
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cents each ; per dozen $3 00 

Secret Societies. A discussion of their cliar- 
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l-'.lanchard and R.;v. Edward Bcecher In cloth, 
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History of the Adduction and Murder 

on Capt. Wji, Moeqajt As prepared by seven com- 
mittees of citizens, appointed to ascertain the fate 
of Morgan. This book contains Indisputable, legal 
evidence that JTreemasons abducted and murdered 
Ww. Morgan, for no other offense than the revela- 
tion of Masonry. It contains the sworn testimony 
oi over twenty persons. Including Morgan's wife-, 
and no candid person, after reading this book, can 
floubt that many of the most respectable Freema- 
sons In the Empire State were concerned !a this 
crime. 25 ceatB each; per doi.ea, fS.OO. 

Keminiscences pf Morgan Times-, "j 

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■masonry 10 cents each; per dozen, $1.00, 

Freemasonry Exposed. By Capt. ■William 
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dresB of candidates, signs, due guards, grips, etc. 
This revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
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per dozen, $3.00. 

ON FREEMASONRY. 

Li.c'ht on Freemasonry. By Eider d. 

Bf-rnuid. To which is appended "A Revelation of 
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Member of the Craft." The whole containing over 
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Hand-Book of Freemasonry, by F-. Ro- 
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Chicago, gives the correct or "standard" work and 
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officer in the lodge room, order of openiug and 
closing the lodge, dress of candidate, ceremony of 
initiation, the proper manner of giving the signs, 
grips, etc., are fully illustrated and explninod. 
First three degrees. Paper cover, 35 cents. 

The Master's Carpet, or Masonry and Baal 
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meaning of every ceremony and symbol of the 
lodge, and proves that Modern jylasonry is identi- 
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Bound in fine cloth, 420 pp ,...75cts. 

Freemasonry at a Glance lUuetrates every 
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Vapes toviSo 83 gogso. &iS,^A ^iiW> ^^ s^^te. 



Freemasonry Illustrated. A complete 
exposition of the seven degrees of the Blue Lodge 
and Chapter. Profusely Illustrated. A historical 
Bketch of the Institution and a critical analysis of 
the character of each degree, by Prest. J. Blanch- 
ard, of Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations 
and nearly four hundred notes from standard Ma- 
sonic authorities confirm the truthfulness of this 
exposition and show the character of Masonic teich- 
tag and doctrine. The accuracy of this exposition 
legally attested by J. O. Doesburg, Past Master Un- 
ity O No. 191, Holland, Mich., and oth rs. This 
b the latest, most accurate and complete exposi- 
tion of Blue Lodge and Chapter Masonry. Over 
one hundred Illustrations — several of them full 
page — give a pictorial representation of the lodge- 
-oom, chapter and principal ceremonies of the de- 
grees, with the dress of candidates, signs, grips, 
itc. Complete work of 640 pages, in cloth, $100 
per dozen, $9.00. Paper covers, 75 cents ; per doz- 
en, $7..50. First three degrees (376 pages), in cloth, 
75 cents ; per dozen, $7. .50. Paper cover, 40 cents ; 
per dozen, $4.00. *®=-The Masonic quotations are 
worth the price of this book. 

Mah-Hah-Bone ; comprises the Hand Book, 
Master's Carpet and Freemasonry at a Glance. 
Boimtl in one volnme. This makes one of the most 
complete books of information on the workings 
and symbolism of Freemasonry extant. Well 
bound in cloth, 589 pp , gl.OO 

Adoptive Masonry Illustrated. A full 
and complete illustrated rit'-ial of the five degrees 
of Female Free Masonry, by Thomas Lowe; com- 
prising the degree of Jephtha's Daughter, Ruth, 
Esther, Martha and Electa, and known as the 
Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, Wife's De- 
gree, Sister's Degree and the Benevolent Degree. 
§0 cents each ; per dozen, $1.75. 

Knig-ht Templarismi Illustrated. A full 
Illustrated ritual of the six degrees of the Council 
and Commandery, comprising the degrees of Royal 
Master, Select Master, Super-Excellent Master, 
Knight of the Red Cross. Knight Templar and Knight 
of Malta. A book of 341 pages. In clotli, $1.00; 
$8.50 per dozen. Paper covers, 50cts; $4.00 per 
dozen. 

Grand Lodge Masonry. Its relation to 
civil government and the Christian religion. By 
Prest. .J. Blanchard, at the Monmouth Convention. 
The t'.n-Chrh;tlan, anti-republican and despotic 
character of Freemasonry Is proved from the high- 
est Masonic authorities. 5 cents each; per dozen. 
50 cents. 

«uaga Whitney's Defense before the 
ijBAND Lodge OF Illinois. .Judge Daniel H Whit 
aey was Msister of the lodge when S, L Eelth. a 
member of his lodge, murdered Ellen Slade. .'^udge 
Whitney, by attempting to bring Eelth to juKtIce, 
brought on himself the vengeance ^f the lodge, but 
ibe boldly replied to the cha,rge3 against him, ana 
afterwards renounced Masonry. 15 cents each; per 
dozen. Sl,!i5 

Oaths and Penalties of Freemasonry, 
as proved In court lu the New Berlin Trial. Also 
the letter of Hon. Richard Rush to the anti-Mason 
Ic committee of York County, Pa., May 4th, 1831, 
The New Berlin trials began In the attempt of 
Freemasons to prevent public Initiations by seceding 
Masons. These trials were held at New Berlin. 
Chenango Co., N. T., April 13 and 14th, 18:11, and 
General Augustus C. Welsh, sheriff of the county, 
and other adhering Freemasons, swore to the trutl 
ful revelation of the oaths and penalties. 10 cents 
each; per dozen, $1.00. 

Stearns' Inquiry into the Nature and 
Tekdency of Freemasonry. With an Appendix 
treating on the truth of Morgan's Exposition and 
containing remarks on various points In the charac- 
ter of Masonry, and a Dialogue on the necessity of 
exposing the lodge. 338 pages: cloth, 60 cents each 
per dozen. $5.00. Paper covers, 40 cents each; pe< 
dozen, $4.00. 

Masonic Oaths Null and Void ; or. Free- 
masonry Self-Convicted. This is a book for the 
times. The design of the author is to refute the ar- 
guments of tliose who claim that the oaths of Free- 
masonry are binding upon those who take them. 
His arguments are conclusive, and the forcible 
manner in which they are put, being drawn from 
Scripture, makes them convincing. The minister 
or lecturer will find in this work a rich fund of 
arguments. 207 pp., postpaid 40 cts. 

Bernard's Appendix to Light on M& 
sonry. Showing the character of the Institution 
by its terrible oaths and penalties. Paper covers; 
25 cents each; per dozen, $2,00. 

Freemasonry Self-Condemned. By Ret? 
J. W. Bain. A careful and logical sta( jment oi 
reasons why secret orders should not be fellowsblpeu 
ijy the Christian Church, and by the United Presby- 
terian church In particular. Paper covers; price 
20 cents each; perdozen, $2.00. 

JVlasonrj' a Work of Darkness, adverse 
to Christianity, and Inimical to republican govern- 
ment. By Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong (Presbyterian), 
a seceding Mason of 21 degrees. This Is a very 
telling work and no honest man who reads It wIlL 
think of Joining the lodge. 15 cents each; per 
dozen. $1.25. 

The Etystic Tie, or Freemasonry a 
Leagoe with the Devil. This Is an account of 
tne church trial of Peter Cook and wife, of Elkhart. 
Indiana, for refusing to support a reverend Free- 
mason; and tholr very able defense presented by 
.Mrs. Lucia C. Cook, In which she clearly shows 
that Freemasonry Is antagonistic to the Christian 
religion , 15 cents each ; per dozen. 11 . '^5. 

• Sermon on Masonry, by Rev. James Wll 
ilams. Presiding Elder of Dakota District North- 
we,»t.ern Iowa Conference, M. E. Church — a seced- 
ing Master Mason. Published at the special le- 
ijuest of nine clergymen of different denominations, 
and others. 10 cents each; per dozen, 75 cents. 

Are Masonic Oaths Binding on uae In- 
ITIATE. By Rev. A, L. Post. Proof of the sinful- 
ness of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate theln. 5 
cents each; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Freemasonry Contrary to the Chris- 

TiAN Religion. A clear, cutting argument against 
the lo ige, from a Christian standpoint- 5 cents 
s^ach ; oer dozen, 50 cents. 

Thirteen Eeasons why a Christian should 
not be a Freemason. By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 
The author states his reasons clearly and carefully, 
and any one of the thirteen reasons, If properly con- 
sidered, will keep a Christian out of the lodge. 5 
cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents. 

Oaths and Penalties of the 33 De- 
SBKKS or "REKJiASONRY. To get thcsB thirty-three 
degrees o. Masonic bondage, the candidate takes 
!ialf-a-mIllton horrible oi.th8. 15 cents each; per 
iozen, $1.00. 

ON ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

Sermon on Odd-fellowship and Other Se 
cret Societies, bv Kev. J. Sarver, pastor Evangel- 
ic.' I Lutheran church, Leechbnrg, Pa. This is a 
verv clear argument against secretism of all forms 
and" the duty to disfellowship Odd-fellows. Freema- 
Bous, Knights of Pythias and Grangers Is clearly 
shown bj their confessed character as found In 
their own jrabUoatlons, 10 ceatf ssch: y^s- ao.xaa- 
70 ceatE. 



Odd-fellowship Judged by Its Own Utter- 
sinces; Its Doctrine and Practice Examined In ths 
Light of God's Word, By P.ev. ,1. H. Brockman. 
This Is an exceedingly Interesting, clear discussion 
of the character of Odd-fellowship, In the form of ft 
dialogue. In cloth, 50 cents; per dozen, $4,00, 
Paper covers, 25 cents; per dozen, $2.00. German 
edition, entitled "Christian and Ernst," paper covers, 
50 cents each. The German edition Is published by 
the author. 

Revised Odd-fellowship Illustrated. 
The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, Encamp- 
ment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees, profusely Illus- 
trated, and guaranteed to be strictly accurate; with 
a sketch of the origin, history and character of the 
order, over one hundred foot-note quotations from 
standard authorities, showing the character and 
teachings of the order, end an analysis of each de- 
gree by President .1, Blanchard. This ritual cor- 
responds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. In cloth, 
$1.00; per dozen, $8.00. Paper cover, ,50 cents; per 
dozen, $4.00, 

Other Secret Society Rituals. 

Ritual of the Grand Army of the Ee- 

PtTiiLic, with signs of lecognition, passwords, etc. 
and the ritual of the Machinists and Blacksmiths' 
Union. (The two bound together.) 10 cents each; 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Knights of Pythias Illustrated. By 

Past Chancellor. A full Illustrated exposition of the 
three ranks of the order, with the addition of the 
"Amended, Perfected and AmpUfled Third Rank." 
The lodge-room, signs, countersigns, grips, etc., 
are shown by engravings. 25 cents each ; ner dozen, 
$2.00. 

United Sons of Industry lUustratod. 
A full and complete iUitstrated ritual of the secret 
trades-union of the above name, giving the signs, 

trips, passwords, etc. 15 cents each; per dozen, 
1.25. 

Exposition of the Grange. Edited by Rev 
-A, W. Geeslin. Illustrated with engravings, show- 
i ng lodge-room, signs, signals, etc. 25 cents each ; 
uer dozen, $2,00. 

Temple of Honor Illustrated. A full and 
.-omplete illustrated ritual of "The Templars of 
Honor and Temperance," commonly called the 
Temple of Honor, a historical sketch of the order, 
and an analysis of its character. A complete ex- 
position of the Subordinate Temple, ancf the de- 
grees of Love, Purity and Fidelity, by a Templar 
of Fidelity and Past Worthy Ch'ifii Templar. 25 
cents each ; per dozen $2.00. 

Good Templarism Illustiated. A fuU ano 

iccurate exposition of the degrees of the Lodge, 
i-'emple and Council, with en&avings s'nowing the 
signs, grips, etc. 25 cents each; per dozen, $2.00 

Five Rituals Bound Together. "Oddfel 
lowship Illustrated" (old work), "Knights of 
Pythias Illustrated," "Good Templarism illus- 
trated," "Exposition of the Grange" and "Patual 
of the Grand Army of the Republic," are sold 
bound together in 'Cloth forSLOO; perdoz., $9-00 
Rituals and Secrets Illustrated- com- 
posed of "Temple of Honor Illustrated," "Adop- 
tive Masonry Illuetiated,'" "United Sons of In 
dustry Illustrated," and "Secret Societies Illus- 
trated." $1.00 each; per dozen, $9.00. 

Sermons and Abbresses. 

Sermon on Seci-etism, by Rev, E. Theo 
Cross, pastor Congregational Church, Hamilton, N. 
Y. Tnis Is a very clear array of the objections to 
Masonry that are apparent to all. 5 cents each; oer 
dozen. 50 cents. 

Prof. J. G. Carson, D. D.^ on Secret 

Societies. A most couvinclng argument against 
fcUowshlplng Freemasons In the ChrlscIaD church. 
10 cents eac'^ ; psT t^c-T^es.. '^■^ ■^,e?:^3■ 

Freemasonry a Fourfold Conspiracy. 

Address of Prest. ,1. Blanchard. before the Pittsbuigh 
Convention. This is a most convincing argument 
against the lodge. 5 cents each ; per dozen, 50 cents, 

A Masonic Conspiracy, Resulting in a 
fraudulent divorce, and various other outrages 
upon the rights of a defenseless woman. Also the 
account of a Masonic murder, by two eye-witnesses. 
By Mrs. Louisa Walters. This is a thrillingly Inter 
esting, tme narTfttive, 3Q i>«Kt« sstc."?- ^ev- ^s?*. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. By Rev. 

Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The special object 
of this sermon is to show the r'ght and duty of 
Christians to examine into the character of secret 
societies, no matter what object such societies pro 
(ess to have. Scents each; per dozen, 60 cents. 

Iiisoussion on Secret Societifas, f,^ 

Elder M S Nev.'comer :md Elder G. W, Wilson, i 
Royal Arch Mason. This discussion was first piiC 
lished in a series of articles In the Church Advocal 
25 cents each ; per doz $2.00. 

Prest. H. H. George on Secret Societies. 

.^ powerful address, showing clearly the duty of 
Christian churches to disfellowship secret socletlea, 
10 cents each : per dozen. 75 cents. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State and 

C.1URCH. By Rev. M. S. Drury. The antagonlsu. 
of organized secrecy to the welfare of the family, 
state and church is clearly shown. 10 cents each: 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Narratives and Arguments, showln,^- the 
conflict of secret societies with the Constituv.on 
and laws of the Union and of tb" States, By 
Fr<ancls Semple, The fact that see societies In 
terfere with the exeeuticn and perve- 1 the adminls 
tratlon of law is her-e clearly proved, 15 ceats each, 
[ssv dozen. $1 85. 

Sermon on Filasonry, '^^i'f''^\'^-,^'^7 

Brownlee. In reply to a Masonic Oration by Rev. 
Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, Ohio, An able Sermon by 
'in able man. 5 cents each ; per dozen 50 cents. 



History Kat'l Chiistian Association. 

Its origin, .^t-Jects, what ic has done and aims to dc, 
and the best means to accomplish the end sought; 
the Articles of lucorporat'on. Constitution and By- 
'^w»ot the Asso-jlation. S:5c. each, perdoz. fl.BO. 

Secret Societies, Ancient and Modem, 

AND College Secret Societies. Composed of 
the two pamphlets combined in this title, bouna 
together in Cloth, $1,00 each; per dozen, $9.00. 

Morgan's Ex:position, Abduction and 

-li-EDEK, AND Oaths OF 3:3 p-.-ysES, Composed oi 
■•preemasonri- Exposed." by Capt. Wm. Morgan, 
■'History of the Abduction and Murder of Morgan;' 
•Valance's Confession of the Murder of Capt, W n 
Morgan;" Bernard's Reminiscences of Morgai 
Times," "id Oaths and PenaltSeu ot 33 Der'ece " 

National Christian Association. 



^ -.^^ 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October 8, 1885 



XEAVS OF THE WEEK. 



The niinois State House Commissioners 
having expressed a determination to 111) 
the niches in the rotunda of the Capitol 
with bronze statues of Gov. Xiniac Ed- 
wards. Got. Shadrach Bond. Supreme 
Judge Sydney Breese, Gen. Grant. Lyman 
Trumbull. John A. Logan. Gov.R. J. Og 
lesby and TTm. R. Morrison, a feeling of 
indignation pervades the population of 
Springfield that the commissioners should 
plan to thus illegally expend the appro- 
priation, and to take upon themselves the 
work of honoring the Illinoisans men- 
tioned. Injunction proceedings are prob- 
able. 

At least thirteen inches of rain fell at 
Jacksonville. Fla.. in four days, and the 
railroad people think it unsafe to send out 
any but work trains. 

One of the buildings of the insane asy- 
lum at "Warm Springs. M. T.. was burned 
Tuesday, four of the inmates perishing 
In the liames. 

At midnight Sept. 27. a camp of Chi- 
namen at Newcastle coal mines, near Se- 
attle. Wash. T . was visited by a masked 
mob. A white man who was doing guard 
duty was compelled to surrender his arms, 
and after some parley the visitors agreed 
to give the Chinamen twenty-four hours 
to leave the camp, threatening to riddle 
with bullets all who rem,nned at the end 
of that time. 

A peculiar kind of oar, seemingly part 
silver, but hard as steel, was struck in 
Richview, m., Monday by a miner who 
was sinking a well. People in the dis- 
trict are greatly interested in the find. 

A falling meteor at Pittsburg, Saturday 
night caused a half dozen rumbling ex- 
plosions, alarming many, who thought 
they were earthquake shocks. The aero- 
lite was found Monday night buried deep 
in the soU on a farm near Cannonsburg, 
south of Pittsburg. 

An omnibtis containing school children 
was struck by a train at a crossing in 
Xew Britain, Conn. Minnie and Lottie 
Dyson died of their injuries and their 
brother Charles cannot recover. Two sons 
of David Appenzellar were killed at a 
crossing near Chambersburg, Pa., their 
father narrowly escaping. 

A decree ordering the sale of the "West 
Shore road for not less than $22,000,000 
was entered at Xewburgh Thursday by 
Judge Brown. Abram S. Cassidy was 
appointed referee for the sale of the 
property. 

The loss sustained by reason of the 
collapse of the building in the rear of the 
Dake bakery on Clark street, Chicago, at 
an early hour Thursday morning, will be 
about $T2,0<>0. A number of men en- 
gaged in !he building escaped after they 
found the floors settling. 

The mud-drum connecting a battery of 
boilers in Clarke & Co.'s solar iron works 
at Pittsburg, exploded Friday morning, 
blowing machines, hoop-iron and tools in 
all directions, a flying missile bursting 
the cylinder head of a large engine, the 
escaping steam doing deadly work among 
the employes. Seventeen men and boys 
were burned or maimed, two of the vic- 
tims dying after removal to the hospital. 
Four others are thought to be mortally 
injured. This is the third explosion in 
the same mill within five years. 

A terrible accident happened on the Fer- 
gus Falls branch of the Northern Pacific 
railroad, seven miles west of St. Paul 
Sunday morning, by which five men lost 
their lives, and thirty or forty more were 
more or less injured. John Robinson's 
show left "Wahp&ton, D. T., in two sec- 
tions. "When within seven miles of Fer- 
gus Falls, the head or baggage section 
broke in two while going up a heavy 
grade, and ten or twelve cars went flying 
back for a mile at a tenffic rate. On the 
rear of the train were three sleeping cars, 
occupied by workmen, over two hundred 
in number, all of whom were sound asleep, 
and not aware of impending danger. 
The engineer of the rear section saw the 
cars approaching, but only had time to 
stop his train before it struck his engine 
with tremendous force, throwihg the 
three sleepers from the track and smash- 
ing them beyond recognition. More than 
a hundred men were buried in the debris. 
The village of Westwood, N, J., was 
struck by a regular "Western cyclone about 
1 o'clock Sunday afternoon, causing much 
damage, but no loss of life. A dark fun- 
nel-shaped cloud, which seemed to rise 



from behind the hills west of the village, 
approached at a terrific rate of speed. 
The path of the cyclone was about 200 
feet wide, almost directly to the center of 
the village. The hotel, a new, but unfin- 
ished school-house, and the village church 
were completely wrecked, and many 
dwellings, barns, and outbuildings were 
scattered about the fields. C S. De- 
baun's distillery, which contained 13.000 
gallons of cider and a large quantity of 
apple whisky, is almost a complete loss. 



The Sultan has issued a decree ordering 
the Turkish troops to mass at Adrianople. 
Si;rvia has 80,000 men under arms. Rus- 
sian journals express the opinion that the 
Constantinople conference will be with- 
out result. 

The Earl of Shaftesbury, the English 
philanthropist, died Thursday, aged 84 
years. 

A dispatch to .the London daily Tele- 
grap/i states that 6,000 Russians have 
crossed the Danube in Bulgaria and ar- 
rived in Roumania by special trains dur- 
ing the night. 

Mr. Gladstone, replying to telegrams 
from Bucharest and Philippopolis, has 
written as follows to the metropolitan of 
Bulgaria: "I understand that the powers 
are disposed to treat the recent events 
with caution and moderation. I sincerely 
trust that the attitude of the population 
will encourage the powers in such a 
course. My position now is that of a 
simple member of Parliament, but I shall 
continue to hold the same views in re 
gard to the Balkans as I have held for the 
last three years." 

Disastrous floods covering an area of 
3,500 square miles, have occurred in the 
Presidency of Bengal, the largest and 
most populous of the twelve main divis- 
ons of British India. A great amount 
of property has been destroyed and num- 
bers of lives lost. Many families have 
been made destitute. Houses, crops, cat- 
tle, and portable goods of every descrip- 
tion have been carried away by the floods. 
The government authoritiss are distribut- 
ing provisions and clothing, and doing all 
they can to relieve the sufiierers. 

In consequence of the inauguration of 
compulsory vaccination a howling mob 
surrounded the East End branch of the 
health office in Montreal last week Mon- 
day, and completely wrecked the build- 
ing. The police on duty were powerless, 
and the mob, gathering strength from this, 
marched upon the central oifice in the 
City Hall. After the mob smashed the 
central ofiice, they turned their attention 
to the central police station, and soon 
had all the windows in that building bro- 
ken. Revolver shots were freely flred at 
the police. To scare them the police fired 
over their heads, only to be received with 
jeers and laughter. The constables now 
charged the mob, clubbing them right 
and left and succeeded in dispersing them, 
but not be 'ore they had wrecked the 
greater portion of the Court House win- 
dows, which are opposite the City Hall. 
The mob broke up into different bodies, 
and proceeded to wreck the windows of 
the Herald ofiice and the windows of the 
oflSce of the Medical Health officer, chair- 
man of the Finance Committee and Pub- 
lic "Vacinators. A number of arrests 
were made. 

A dispatch to the London News from 
Sofia says: "Bulgaria is one military camp. 
All the male population between the ages 
of 15 and 45 are under arms, and thou- 
sands of volunteers are being enrolled 
daily. They appear to be earnest and de- 
termined." 

In suTiming up the situation in regard 
to the revolution in Roumelia Smalley's 
special cablegram says that it develops no 
decided phase.s, and that war still hangs 
in the balance. The danger of the situa- 
tion is increased by the delays of the pow- 
ers, owing to difficulty at arriving at com 
bined action. Other cablegrams say that 
the President of the Hungarian Council 
in addressing its members made the au 
thoritative statement that at the recent 
meetings of the Austrian and Rutsian 
Emperors no matters were discussed that 
in any way related to Roumelia. A dep- 
utation of Bulgarians waited on the Czar 
at Elsinore, Denmark, and solicited his 
approval of the annexation of Roumelia 
to Bulgaria. The Czar in replying 
to the deputation, said he would 
endeavor to secure accord among 
the powers to effect a pacific solu- 
tion of the Roumelian difficulty. 



A GOOD MANY 

TIMES ONE WANTS TO REFER TO SOME 
ARTICLE IN THE GynOSIire, BUT THE NUM- 
BERS ARE KEPT LOOSLY AND SOME ARE 
LOST, AND THE .ARTICLE IN A BACK NUM- 
BER CANNOT BE FOUND. To MEET THIS 
DIFFICULTY WE HAVE MADE ARR.VNGE- 
MENTS TO FURNISH THE 

EMERSON PATENT BINDER 

TO ALL WHO WISH IT FOR ONE DOLLAR. 




Each issue of the Cynosure as it 
arrives can be easily adjusted to 
thejblnder and then it is in shape to 
bevery easily referred to. each 
Binder will hold the issues for a 
year, when the volume can be re- 
moved and bound permanently, and 
THE Binder is ready for the next 
year's papers. 

The Binde will be sent postpaid 
on receipt of the price, $1.00 

FOR CODSHSwCROUP USE 

TAYLOR'S 




^^"|E>H 



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MULLEIN. 

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growing along the small streams iu the Southern States, 
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whooping-cough. W'lien comhiued with the healing muci- 
laginous principle in the mullein plant of the old fields, pre- 
sents in TiVLOH's CHEr.oKEE Remkdv o? .Sweet Gum a.nd 
Mullein the flnest known remedy for Coughs, Croup, 
n'hooping-Cough and Consumption ; and bo palatable, any 
child is pleased to (irkc it. Asli your druggist for it. Price, 

25c.aud$l. WALTE R A. TAYIOR, Atlanta, Ga. 

Use DB. BIGGKRS' HUCKI.KBKKRY IJdKDIAI, (or 
Diarrhff-a, Dysentery and Children Teething. For sale by 
ell druggists. 



Cares BLOOD Diseases, 

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all other remedies fall. 

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ver Blossoms and Fluid and 
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COLLECTION BOXES. 

Do Ton Want Money for missionary, church 
or Sunday-school purpoaesV It Is surprising how 
much the children will collect with the 
FAIRBANKS' SAVINGS BOXES 
They are simple and cheap. Price 3 cents each 

T. B. AKNOLD.BPabllsher "^ 
108 rranljllnI8t.,lChlcago, III. 




look: at thk 

AND SEE IE YOUR STJBSCKIPTION EX- 

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" " ' L" l» U , girls for the best colleges, business 
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10, Jan. 5, Mch. SI. G. F. Linfield, Prin., 

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TODD SEMINARY FOR BOYS. 

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kind, parental care, and thorough Instruction. Am- 
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KEV. R. K. TODD, A. M., Prin., Woodstock, 111. 



Man Wanted! 



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In hie locality. Responsible house. References ex- 
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UB. J. C. HOFFMAN, Jefferson, 'Wis. 



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**1h ■ IbB^ every county to sell our 
goods. Salary $75 per Month and Expenses. 
Canvassini; Outtit and Particulars FREE. 
Standaud Silvek-Wake Co., Boston, Mass. 






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weighs accurately from one ounce to 25 
pounds. No springs, no slides, no weights. 
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and r.ipid sales surprise old ag-ents. 
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A flP'NTTS Wantedl Rider's Improved 

filoider. Agents 
ave grand success. a|gn»- , 
Houyekeepers will ' 

have from 1 to 5. S 
Send for circulars,]! 
and see what it is,* 
anyhow, ^ ... ^ 

E.W. Rider, Racine. Wis. 

NOVELTY RUG 
MACHINE. Pat'd 

Dec. 27, I8SI. For making Rugs, 
Tidies, Hoods, Mittens, etc. Sent 
1)V mall with full directions. Prices!. Agents wanted. 
Alanufucturers of stamped Rug Patterns and dealers 
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Si. in 3 years. Climate and soil same as California. 
Send for circular and prospectus. Also Colony lands 
In California. Monthly excursions, $5'2.60. 

Wm. H. Martin, 126 Washington St., Chicago. 

Lesson Quarterly. 

Contains the same matter as the Light and Life 
Lesson Leaf, hound in a quarterly forui, with maps 
and other helps. It also contains many suggestions 
and Instructions concerning the management of the 
Sunday-school. Price, per quarter, 3 cents. 

T. B. ARNOLD, Publisher. 

106 Franklin street Chicago, 111. 

SUCCESSORS TO PRESTON, KEAN & CO., 

CMICA.GO, ILL. 

RECEIVE DEPOSITS, GRANT DIS- 
COUNTS, FOREIGN EXCHANGE, 
COLLECTIONS. 

A line of CHOICE Investments always on hand. 




For this Grand Rapids Bedroom Suit, 
1 three pieces. Mahogany finished, hevel 

plate glass. Plush Parlor Suits complete, 
k82.5. Tapestry carpets, 50 cents. Ingrains, 
l3Uc. No. 7 Range, complete, Sll. 
' The Newberry Furniture Company, 

284, 281) and 288 Wabash av. Only one Suit 
to each Customer. Open evenings. 



$18^ 




And take no 
other. If he 
does not keep 
it. It is be- 
cause of its 
durability. 
Price. Family 
Size, 50 cents; 
Laundry size, 
75 cents. 



This Washboard Is made of one solid 
■ihcet of heavy corrugated zinc, which 
produces a double-faced board of the 
best quality and durability. The flut- 
ing is very deep, holding more water, 
and consequently doing better wash 
Ing than any washboard in the mar- 
ket. 'I'll!' truitic is made of hard wood 
iiiid held toKclher witli an iron bolt 
running llir'out.'ti a tulie formed on the 
l;i\ser ii\^r Ml* (he zinc, thus binding 
I hi- nil. lie tii[,'i'ther In the most sub- 
niiiil iniiniicr, and producln^a wash 
ellence 
onably the 
so many 
object to our board on 
account of Its DtrEABiLiTY, saying, "It 
will last' too long. We can never sell 
a customer but one." We take this 
means to advise customers to insist 
upon having the Nor. th Star Wasb- 

BOAKD. 

The best is the cheapest. 



siiiniiiil iniiniicr, and producln^d 
lioard w hull foi' economy, exce 
ami (luiii'iiljty, is unquesfionabl 
^lest In I he world. We find so 
Iilealers that object to our bo; 



We will forward board on receipt of 
price. 

MANUFACTURED BT 

P FANSCHMIDT, DODGE & CO. 

sS to 86'TFalton st. - \- li Chicago, IU 

&&.,_ _ _ 



Christian Closure. 



Vol. XV in., No. 4. 



"IN SECRET HAVE I SAID NOTHING. "—Jesus Ohrist. 

CHICAGO, THTJESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1885. 



Wholb No. 807. 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHEISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

£21 West Madison IStf^cM, Chicago. 

J. P. STODDARD, , General Agent 

W. I. PHILLIPS Publisher. 

SUBSCBIPTION FEB YEAB $2,00. 

If PAID STRICTLY IN ADVANCE $1.50. 

M^'No paper dincontmued unless so requested by the 
subscriber, and all arrearages paid..,£^ 

Address all letters for publication to Editor Christian 
Cynosure, Chicago. Writers' names must always be 
given. No manuscript returned unless requested and 
postage enclosed. 

Address all business letters and make all drafts and 
money-orders payable to W. I. Phillips, Treas., 221 
West Madison Street, Chicago. Currency by unregistered 
letter at sender's risk. When writing to change address 
always give the former address. 

[Entered at the Post-office at Chicago, 111., as Second Class matter.] 



Editorial : 

Notes and Comments 1 

Hon. Richard Rush 8 

Personal Mention 5 

Contributions : 
The Kingdom of God on 

Earth 1 

A Powerful Appeal for 

the South 2 

A Plea for Union 2 

The Order of Templars. . . . 3 
Selected : 

Who Bides His Time 

(Poetry) 3 

The Gospel the very heart 

of Social Reforms 3 

Hon. Richard Rush on Se- 
cret Societies 4 

Bible Lessons 6 

An Appeal for Rev. R. N. 

Countee 9 

The Home 10 

Temperance 11 



Correspondence : 
Loyal United Brethren to 
the Front; Half-way An- 
ti-mason; An Invitation 
to Lecturers; Pith and 

Point 6 

Reform News : 
Notices ; From the Gener- 
al Agent; To Ohio 
Friends ; From the Kan- 
sas Agent; Bro. Hawley 

in Iowa 4,5 

TheN.C.A 7 

The American Partt 7 

Churches vs. LoDGERT — 7 

Lecture List 7 

The Churches: 
Free Methodist Testimony 12 

Lodge Notes 13 

Home and Health 14 

Farm Notes 15 

News op the Week 16 

Markets 13 



The Hamilton county Ohio Prohibition conven- 
tion held at No. 200 Vine street, Cincinnati, August 
21st, broke the ice on the lodge question and set the 
example for all the Prohibition friends by resolving, 
"That we are in pavor of open methods of 
WORK, and we therefore bid God speed to the W. C. 
T. U. iuits methods and labors, and will supplement 
their endeavors by our vote." Let this action be 
echoed all along the line, and Americans and Prohi- 
bitionists can easily be one. 



The Mormon General Conference last Wednesday 
received a long general epistle from the two presi- 
dents of the church, Taylor and Cannon, in which 
the Edmunds law and the authorities engaged in en- 
forcing it are denounced with-the strongest language, 
and the Mormons are urged to stand by the faith. 
The letter expresses a slight hope in the clemency 
of President Cleveland. Meantime the work of 
prosecution drives on relentlessly. Five Mormons 
were convicted last Monday, and on refusing to agree 
to obey the law, were all given the full sentence of 
$300 fine and six months' imprisonment. The letter 
of the presidents further advises the Mormons to 
avoid secret societies of all kinds!! Truly the poor 
Saints of the Latter Day are now in an evil case. 
Beset on all sides by the law that jails them because 
they will adhere to the oaths they have taken in 
their Endowment House lodge, now their very lead- 
ers and oracles demand that they shall avoid that to 
which they have sworn. If Taylor and Cannon can 
find a society more secret than their own we should 
be thakf ul for the information. 



the Endowment House lay right across the path of 
justice in the Territory; that witnesses either would 
not testify or would swear to falsehoods; and that 
Mormon jurymen had no regard for the oath of 
God if it conflicted with their Mormon oath, he bold- 
ly drew a line before the jury-box on every for- 
sworn Mormon in every case where the tenets of the 
church were involved. His decision and practice 
has been sustained by the United States Supreme 
Court and he has thus been enabled to convict scores 
of polygamists. The case with Masonry is almost 
exactly the same. We must remember this. 



"Woe be to the Judge that sits on the bench of 
the Third District Court. We will not stand his 
abuse much longer," was the solemn sentence pro- 
nounced on Judge Zane by Apostle Heber J. Grant, 
in the Mormon Tabernacle on a late Sunday. Nev- 
ertheless Judge Zane lives, and we hope will live to 
see the last of the Mormon abomination. To him 
Anti-masonry is indebted for a precedent which may 
in time be useful. Finding that the secret oaths of 




RICHARD RUSH. 
[See pages 4 and S.J 

Infidel and Masonic France holds its elections on 
the Sabbath. A nation that thus scouts the law of 
God might be expected to use its power in injustice 
and cruelty in the greedy endeavor to seize upon 
Madagascar and Tonquin. But the leaders have 
been rebuked by a "Conservative" victory in the 
election of October 4th. There is a universal ex- 
planation that the large gains of the monarchist fac- 
tions are due to the extravagance of the government 
in foreign wars. The people embraced the opportu- 
nity to protest against the disastrous colonial policy 
pursued during recent years. The policy of con- 
quest in Tonquin and Madagascar, M. de Molineari, 
chief of the French delegates in Canada, says was 
never popular with the French people. France lost 
15,000 men in the Tonquin campaign, and her losses 
in money, including the cost of building forts, hos- 
pitals, and frontier defenses, were $215,000,000. As 
a result of the elections the Tonquin operations are 
much restricted and a large portion of the troops 
have been ordered home, and a portion of the Cabi- 
net have resigned. It is believed this defeat will 
not endanger the republic but will put a stop to for- 
eign aggression. 



A remarkable Morgan case has transpired among 
the Chinese of Oregon and has reached the courts, 
as the dispatch quoted in our "Lodge Notes" shows. 
The best comment we can make is to reprint the fol- 
lowing from the Chicago Daily Herald, entitled "A 
Chinese Morgan:" "The Chinese of Portland, Ore., 
have a Morgan named See Choy. Mr. Choy was a 
member of a Mongolian secret society; which sus- 
pected him of divulging its secrets. He was enticed 
to the lodge-room one evening and murdered, but by 
whom is yet something of a mystery. The Chinese 
have themselves put forward a fellow named Wah 
Tim as the guilty man and are making an eflbrt in 
their own peculiar way to have him convicted, but the 
authorities believe that he is being made the scape- 
goat for the sins of many others. This inference is 
well warranted by the known customs of the race. 



Many of the most mysterious crimes against China- 
men are perpetrated by Chinamen themselves, who 
have their own professional assassins, and who fre- 
quently use them to carry out sentences imposed by 
their own secret tribunals. The Portland tragedy 
looks like the work of one of these hired murderers 
to protect whom when in trouble it becomes the dut}^ 
of the entire colony. If such is the case the law 
may hang somebody for the crime committed, but 
the chances are that the victim will not be the guilty 
party." 



TH£! KINOLOM OF COB ON EARTH. 



BY REV. DAVID MCKAIJ.. 



We say "Thy kingdom come" every day. We be- 
lieve in the realitj' and desirableness of the kingdom 
and in the supremacy of his will, and hence the 
prayer. If it is uttered under any other impression 
it is insincere and parrot-like. There are some who 
affect to believe that the establishment of this king- 
dom on earth as it is in heaven would be a world-wide 
calamity, and that the doing of his will here as it is 
done there would deluge the nations with blood. In 
support of this they appeal to histoiy. They have read 
of fires being kindled, and gibbets erected, and in- 
quisitions held, where wheel, and boot and thumb- 
screw, and such instruments of torture were em- 
ployed: and as this was done hj men professing to 
be doing God's service, they predict a return of the 
same methods, if Christianitj' should ever become a 
controlling power in the laws of any land. 

We think these gentlemen should quiet their ap- 
prehensions. T\xQj are in no danger. If the}^ would 
take a second look at history's page they would see 
that when blood flowed freest there was not an infi- 
del drop in it. That fact should be reassuring. It 
is hardly within the range of possibility that a 
preacher of blasphemy should suffer for righteous- 
ness' sake; or a believer in nothing be persecuted for 
his creed. That would be a new thing under the sun. 
The simple truth is, those who suffered were believ- 
ers in the Lord Jesus Christ; and they suffered be- 
cause they persisted in doing what they could to es- 
tablish his kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. 
They suffered indeed at the hands of men who 
claimed to believe in the same name, and to be act- 
ing for the good of the same cause, and b}" a very 
large exercise of charity — -that charity that "believ- 
eth all things" — we may sujypose them to have been 
sincere. But that they were wholly mistaken we 
confidently appeal to the enlightened judgment of 
the 19th centui'}'. Our terrified friends, therefore, 
are simply putting the shoe on the wrong foot, and 
it is all we can do to give them credit for sinceritj' 
in doing it. The facts are so plain that even fools 
should not err therein. 

One circumstance, however, seems to lend color to 
the genuineness of their alarm. They affiliate with 
the ancient oppressor. In case a difficulty should 
arise they want to be on the safe side. This looks 
a little cowardly, but we are not responsible for it. 
The fact is as we have stated it. On all test ques- 
tions as to to the actual supremacy of a pure Chris- 
tianity the infidel and the Catholic stand shoulder 
to shoulder, and always in the opposition. W^itness 
the hostility to the Bible in the public schools, op- 
position to Sabbath laws, chaplains in the army and 
navy, and the general onslaught on every vestige of 
Christianity found in the institutions of our country. 
In all this the infidel is hand in glove with the Cath- 
olic. The closest observer can hardly tell which is 
animated by the deeper hatred of Protestant Chris- 
tianity. 

It is curious to notice this .alliance. The infidel 
does not love the Catholic nor the Catholic the infi- 
del. Oh, no. It is not on that principle that they 
have joined hands in this crusade. But the infidel, 
with as little discrimination as a goat at a mirror, 
attacks whatever religion is uppermost; and so, un- 
der pretence of averting persecution he seeks to 
overthrow that very form of religion, which, like fts 
Master, has ordered the sword into its scabbard; and 
lends whatever aid he can to the Catholic, who, in 
his admiration for the methods of St. Peter would 



r 



THE CHKISTIAN CYKO^U^S^. 



October 15, 1885 



soon iejive the most of us without our ears. And it 
is just in order to reach this very desirable end that 
the Catholic accepts of inlidel assistance. He seeks 
to overthrow Protestant Christianity in order to es- 
tablish the goovi old npime when blood llowed like 
water in the interests of the Romish corporation. 
You will perceive, therefore, the ditlerent intention 
which each has in view. The infidel wishes to avert 
all persecution for conscience' sake, but foolishly 
goes to work to saw oH' the very limb on which liVi- 
erty of couscieni.'e depends. The Catholic encour- 
ages him in his work, in the meantime keeping his 
weather eye on the inquisition, and making no rash 
promises as to what he will do when the limb is 
down. 

We think it is just as well, however, that these two 
should Ix? united. Pivtestaut Christianity has to 
deal with both of them, and the sooner they get 
squarely in front so much the better. We may be 
permittetl to hope the contest will not be bloody, al- 
though the readiness with which 19th century civili- 
zation appeals to the sword is not very encouraging. 
Of this only we are assured that Christ's kingdom 
will come, and his will shall be done on earth as it is 
in heaven. The prayere of the church for these 
many years will not always remain unanswered. The 
enemy will not always prevail. The Lord will one 
day take to him his great power and reign. The king- 
doms of this world will yet become the kingdoms of 
our Lord and his Christ. 

But what are we to understand by God's kingdom 
on earth? Those who oppose its establishment are 
constantly reminding us that Christ said "My king- 
dom is not of this world." Very true. Still he did 
not say -My kingdom is not in this world." If he 
had that would have settled the question. On the 
contrary numerous passages of Scripture speak of his 
kingdom as here. Would he have taught us to pray 
daily --Thy kingdom come."' if there were no king- 
dom to come? Or is he to '-take to him his power 
and reign" over nothing? Surely not. He has a 
kingdom then in this world, which is to grow, like 
the stone cut out of the mountain without hands, 
tmtil it fills the whole earth. 

This kingdom is spoken of both as to its charact- 
er and its effects. In its character it consists in 
••righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Ghost." 
Hence it presents a strong contrast to the character 
hitherto borne by the kingdoms of this.world, which 
has been very largely that of iniquity, spoliation and 
war. 

The effect of its establishment on earth is described 
in the loftiest language. The mountains and the 
hills shall bring forth peace to the people. The na- 
tions shall beat their swords into jjlowshares, and 
their spears into pruning-hooks. and learn war no 
more. All bitterness and animosity shall depart. 
The wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard 
lie down with the kid, the calf and the j'oung lion 
and the fattling together, and a little child shall lead 
them. The cow and the bear shall feed and their 
young ones lie down together, and the lion shall eat 
straw like the ox. The 3'oung child shall play at the 
hole of the asp. and the weaned child put his hand 
on the adder's den, and they shall not hurt or destroj' 
in all my holy mountain. The effect of it on the 
lives and enjoyments of men is also spoken of. 
There is to be a new state of society, and a very 
much improved condition of human life. There is 
to be a new heaven and a new earth, and so superla- 
tive will these be that the former will not be remem- 
bered nor come into mind. The voice of weeping 
shall be no more heard, but the voice of joy and re- 
joicing instead. The ravages of disease will be 
stayed, and the grave will be reached through ma- 
turity. •'As a shock of com cometh in in his season." 
There shall be no more an infant of days, nor an old 
man that hath not filled his days. The earth herself 
shall renew her youth and being forth b}- handfuls. 
There shall be abundance of corn in the earth upon 
the top of the mountains. The earth shall keep ju- 
bilee, and God even our God shall bless us. 

This is the effect, pictorial!}- described, of the es- 
tablishment of Christ's kingdom on earth. It repre- 
sents a time when the song of the angels shall be 
realized. •Glorj- to God in the highest and on earth 
peace and good will to men." And when this comes 
to pass we may be sure that most of the evils that 
now curse the earth will be abolished. Such cr3-ing 
evils as intemperance and the use of tobacco by 
which the resources of the famih' are criminally 
squandered, its peace destroyed, and the moral and 
spiritual welfare of it seriously imperiled, will be 
discontinued. 

But this idea of the kingdom of ChrLst does not 
complete the picture. It is worth while to labor and 
pray and wait for this, but it is not all. Indeed we 
could hardh- have this much without having more. 
Such peace, happiness, and prosperity could hardly 
be the world's portion unless the governments of the 



earth were ditlerent from what they are to-day. Wen- 
dell Phillips used to say that goverumeuts were like 
crutches, or go-carts, to help the people along: and 
he hoped for the time when the people would be so 
good, and enlightened, and loyal to the right that 
they would get along without them. We do not look 
for that, but we do look for the time when the gov- 
ernments of this world will be born again; when they 
will be loyal in their allegiance to King Jesus, when 
they will make his will their supreme law, and thus 
recognize him Lord of all. Wheu this point has been 
reached the governments of this world, instead of 
being crutches and go-carts, to be laid aside as use- 
less by a people who have learned to do without 
them, will be found to be earth's greatest blessing — 
the crowning ornament of a blessed and happy peo- 
ple. Order is heaven's first law. There is govern- 
ment there. The Lord Jesus Christ rules there at 
the right hand of God; and if he were obej'ed on 
earth as he is in heaven, earth would be, according 
to its measure, as happy as heaven. The more ex- 
tensively bis kingdom is established here, the more 
fully his will is done, and the nearer it reaches all 
the springs of human action, the blighter and better 
the day will be for our world. 

This kingdom is established first of all in the 
heart of the individual. Men are not born Chris- 
tians. New blood must be infused in all our veins. 
Some are earl}' admitted as Jeremiah was, others, 
like Paul, are born out of due time. But no matter 
how or when the change is wrought, the kingdom of 
God is then set up in the heart. Then the peace of 
God fills the soul and the joj' of the Holy Ghost 
makes it vocal with song. 

But such a heart is not content to be alone in this 
respect. It ardently wishes all hearts to be brought 
into the same relations to God, and to enjoy the 
same blessings. The very spirit of the kingdom of 
God is like leaven which a woman took and hid in 
three measures of meal till the whole was leavened. 
Put one such heart in a million, and if true to itself, 
it will not rest until all are brought into obedience to 
Jesus Christ. The living waters always overflow. 
As these hearts multiply in any particular place, or 
nation, they must, if true to themselves, exert a 
healthful influence on public affairs. It is not possi- 
ble for instance, that a dozen true Christians should 
conduct a business on anti-Christian principles. 
Would twelve men, separately or individually, ab- 
horing dishonesty, conduct a joint business on dis- 
honest principles? Would they, reverencing the 
name- of God themselves, make blasphemy a promi- 
nent feature of their firm? Or each of them being 
a firm believer in the sancit}' of the Sabbath would 
they unitedl}^ profane it? No, certainly not, unless 
drugged and cozzened by fallacious reasoning, until 
the}' had come to imagine that social relations de- 
stroyed individual responsibility. Hence, whenever 
Christians are responsible for the management of 
public affairs, if true to themselves, these aflJairs 
must be conducted on Christian principles. When- 
ever truly Christian people become sufficiently num- 
erous in any locality to exercise a controlling influ- 
ence over its affairs, the kingdom of God might be 
established there: and as soon as they rise to a 
just sense of their responsibility and make their in- 
fluence felt, the kingdom of God will be established 
there. In this way the kingdom of God, which is 
first established in the heart, comes abroad, and is 
finally openly and publicly established in the world. 
And when this comes to pass will not that kingdom 
be a power for good in the world? And will not 
that power be greater than the power of its individ- 
ual members? What a power a state or nation has 
when it speaks through its regularly constituted au- 
thorities. What a power for good such a state or 
nation would have if it spoke or acted on Christian 
principles. One such nation as the United States 
could bless mankind. 

The practical question occurs here, Are there not 
enough Christian men and women in the United 
States to transform its character in a day? Could 
they not, if true to their Master, with a voice as au- 
thoritative as his own, cast out all the evil spirits 
that infest the country? Could intemperance, Sab- 
1)ath-breaking, secretism, Mormonism, the social 
evil, or any of the crying e- ils of our day, resist the 
might of public opinion, if it were crystalized into 
law and brought to bear upon them? The great dif- 
ficulty is, private conscience loses its purity and 
power when it becomes public. The need of our day 
is a Christianity true to itaelfin all the relations of 
life. If some of our gifted revivalists would take 
up this point and push it until it would be realized, 
we should .soon see the kingdom of God come among 
us with power. We have so long looked at the need 
\ of personal religion, that we have almost lost sight 
jof the public necessity for it, and some doubt if it 
'• has any claim upon our attention. 
Chwrnhen ISt. Church, Boston. 



A POWERFUL APPEAL FOR THE SOUTH. 



Editor Christian Cynosure: — There will never 
be a more favorable time for sending the Cynosure 
to colored pastors, and for distributing your tracts 
and books among the colored people of the South 
than now. The evils of secret societies have be- 
come so great in many places that many of the bet- 
ter classes of pastors and other leaders in the church- 
es are alarmed. 

Some are already out-spoken in their opposition 
to them, but there are many others, good men too, 
who have not the courage to come out and take a 
positive stand against the societies. All that many 
of them need to become valuable helpers in turning 
the people away from secret societies is to be heart- 
ened and strengthened, as they would be by reading 
the Cynosure. They do not kuow that anybody of 
any standing and influence is opposing secretism. 
They have every reason to believe that these secret 
orders are approved by the the leading men of the 
country, preachers included, seeing as they do so 
many prominent white men in them, and never hear- 
ing a word against them. It is a surprise, a revela- 
tion, to many to learn that so many of the best Chris- 
tian men and women in the world are not only ut- 
terly opposed to all kinds of secret societies and 
boldly speak and write against them, but have a 
strong organization for the prosecution of this great 
reform. This knowledge itself greatly strengthens 
and encourages them. But when they become strong 
enough to speak out, they need facts and arguments 
such as are furnished in your paper and other publi- 
cations. 

In some places the evils of secret societies on the 
churches have not been experienced. They are just 
being brought under their baneful influence. Many 
pastors are thoughtlessly, some selfishly, joining them 
and helping to influence their members to join them. 
The church houses are used generally in villages and 
country places, at first, as the places for the society 
meetings. In a number of places, in different States, 
during the past few months, I heard of men who 
were establishing secreb orders among the colored 
people, where none had existed before. With prop- 
er effort to warn the people against them now, mul- 
titudes could be saved from their influence. 

The lodges everywhere make a special effort to 
get young men of talent, teachers and professional 
men, and men who are beginning to make their mark, 
or who are accumulating property, and whoare lead- 
ers of sentiment among the colored people, as well 
as the preachers, to join them, and many are being 
entrapped, and their influence secured for secretism, 
who would not go into them if properly instructed 
as to their nature. 

Many other reasons could be given why the Oyno- 
nosure, by the thousand, and tracts by the million, 
should be sent into the South at this time. 

If only the leaders of the 800,000 colored Bap- 
tists were supplied the whole South would be leav- 
ened. The eff'ect would be nearly as great if the 
leaders of the vai'ious Methodist bodies were sup- 
plied. One hundred dollars now would do more 
good than thousands will ten years from now, or even 
five. 

There is one other reason that I will mention why 
the National Christian Association should do more 
than ever now to circulate literature and help in 
other ways to push forward this reform in the South. 
The Association has helped to bring on the battle, 
and it would be in every way wrong to leave such 
brethren as pastors Countee, Brinkley, and Imes in 
Memphis, and brethren in other sections, who are as 
truly in the fight and suff'ering because of the stand 
they have taken, to battle alone. The Association 
ought, at least, to furnish them ammunition. 

H. WOODSMALL. 

luka, Miss., Sept. SO, 1885. 

. i» « *■ 

A PLEA FOR UNION. 



When Prohibition votes were cast only for protest 
and for conscience their force was but little weaken- 
ed by division. But when success looms up as one 
of the possibilities of the near future, division be- 
comes a serious matter. 

Such is the situation to-day, and^many hearts are 
aching while they ask, Can the American and Prohi- 
hition parties he united f 

I know of but one serious difficulty in the way, 
and that is the question of secrecy. If my memory 
serves me right, both parties endorse National Re- 
form. Both are prohibition to the core. There 
might be some heart-burning over the name adopted 
and over the proper distribution of honors, for we 
are all human. But I doubt not all this could be 
arranged without difficulty or delay were the ques- 
tion of secretism disposed of. 

Can this difficulty be satisfactorily adjusted? 



October 15, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAK CYNOStTRE. 



It is plain that Americans cannot vote for lodge- 
men to be the rulers of the people. Not because 
they are stubborn and prejudiced, but simply because 
they are conscientious. "We may plant a stone at 
this point, and call it one of the "Ancient Land- 
marks." On the other hand neither principle nor 
conscience forbids a Prohibitionist to vote for a 
man who may be entirely free from lodge affiliation. 
I do not believe that the leaders of that party would 
usually even prefer that their standard-bearers should 
be lodge-men. 

In view of these facts I will take the liberty to 
make the following 

SaGGESTION: 

Let the leaders of the American party address a 
letter over their united signature to all the leading 
names in the Prohibition party sending a copy to 
each one individually, and requesting a reply. Let 
the letter set forth: 

1. Our deep interest in the early success of the 
prohibition cause. 

2. To secure that success we, as a party, are 
willing to unite with them and be governed by the 
decisions of the majority in convention assembled, 
if they will respect our conscientious convictions in 
only one particular, viz., that adhering lodgemen 
shall not be endorsed as candidates for office. 

3. Will you personally favor such a compromise? 
Let the letter and the replies be published. If 

the union is eflTected much will be gained. If it is 
rejected there will be but one course open to us as 
Americans. We must be true to our principles 
though the heavens fall. P. S. Feemster. 



WHO BIDES HIS TIMB. 

Who bides his time and day by day 

Faces defeat full patiently, 
And lifts a mirthful roundelay, 

However poor his fortune be — 
He will not fall in any qualm 

Of poverty— the paltry dime 

It will grow golden in his palm. 

Who bides his time. 

Who bides his time —he tastes the sweet 

Of honey in the saltest tear ; 
And though he fares with slowest feet, 

Joy runs to meet him, drawing near ; 
The birds are heralds of his cause. 

And like a never-ending rhyme, 
The roadsides bloom in his applause. 
Who bides his time. 

Who bides his time, and fevers not 
la the hot race that none achieve, 
Shall wear cool wreathen laurel, wrought 

With crimson berries in the leaves, 
And he shall reign a goodly king, 
And sway his hand o'er every clime, 
With peace writ on his signet ring. 
Who bides his time. 



— Seleetbd. 



THE ORDER OF TEMPLARS. 



Office of "Tidens Fragor," ] 
New York, Sept. 25, 1885. ) 

I notice that your paper is against secret societies. 
You may therefore be pleased to learn of an order 
that is not secret. As founder of the same, I take 
pleasure in enclosing the platform of principles. 

The order was organized June 16th and 18th, 
1883. Some of the ceremonies are copied from the 
Grood Templars, being about half as long and sim- 
plified with the obligation of secrecy excluded in 
each degree. We have three degrees: temple, dis- 
trict, and grand degree. The names of officers are 
shortened. The ceremonies in each degree can be 
omitted where preferred and the pledge only used, 
etc. 

So far as I know there is no temperance order in 
existence, except this one, but they are all secret, 
and I can see no necessity for it. If a friend wish- 
es to be present there should be no objection. 

The GrOod Templar order (in which I before have 
been an active worker since 1872) refused at its 
Right Worthy Grand Lodge session, 1883, in Chi- 
cago, to permit the existence of an American-Scan- 
dinavian Grand Lodge which Scandinavian lodges 
in this country should be subordinate, and then ten 
Scandinavian Good Templar lodges left that order 
and organized a new organization as above. We 
believe that our people can work better together for 
temperance if united under one supreme body on 
the same principles as the Swedish Lutheran Augus- 
tana Synod and other religious bodies are united for 
Christian work. 

When forming this order, we believed and still 
believe that the time for any great prosperity of 
secret temperance orders is passed, and that a new 
order can be founded with the best features of other 



orders without such secrecy, that may be able' to 
unite all temperance elements into one strong active 
body. Our order numbers to-day forty-two subord- 
inate temples and four district temples in this coun- 
try, with nearly 1,200 members. (3f these forty-two 
there are thirty-one Swedish, seven Norwegian, and 
four Finnish temples. We have also seven temples 
in Sweden and one in Norway. A Grand Temple 
will be organized in Sweden in October or Novem- 
ber. Our next annual session is held in Chicago, 
third Monday in July, 1886. 

We held a meeting in Boston (extra Grand Tem- 
ple session) last Monday (Sept. 21st), and public 
meeting Sept. 20th in memory of the Rush Temper- 
ance Centennial. Over 200 Scandinavians were 
present from New York and the New P]ngland 
States. We have six temples in Illinois, ten in 
Michigan, and one in Texas. Others so far are in 
Eastern States. We intend to try and introduce 
orders among native Americans whenever desired. 
A resolution adopted in Boston recommends the 
support of the Prohibition party as the leading one 
of the future and that the temples hold public polit- 
ical meetings in October. Yours fraternally, 

A. Peterson. 

THE TEMPLARS PLATFORM OF PRINCIPLES 

is as follows, never to be changed : 

1. To concentrate and unite all acceptable persons, men and 
women, of any race, language or nationality, who believe in the 
existence and power of Almighty God, for the purpose of pro- 
moting total abstinence and encouraging them to co-operate, 
politically or otherwise, with all such etlorts that have in view 
the abolition of the license laws and the vrohibltion of the impor- 
tation, manufacture and sale of all intoxicating liquors, as a 
beverage. 

3. To assist each other in cases of sickness by establishing a 
fund for that purpose to be under the charge of each District 
Temple. 

3. To establish a life insurance fund for cases of accidents or 
deaths to be under the charge of each Grand Temple. 

4. To assist each other in obtaining employtnent by establish- 
ing offices for that purpose, wherever possible. 

a. To keep the machinery of the order as simjMfled as possible, 
only adopting the best features of other organizations. Short 
ceremonies to be used, or, where preferred, only the pledge. 

6. To avoid pledging any member to secrecy in any degree, as 
this order ds not intended as a secret organization, only organ- 
ized in a similar manner; the members to be the proper judges 
of what to keep private at their business meetings without anj- 
such pledge. 

7. To grant "duaV Grand Temple charters to foreign-born 
residents and citizens, who from a better knowledge of their 
own people's language and customs, can show they may become 
more successful by having their own Grand Body, with jurisdic- 
tion only over those speaking such language, similar to the sys- 
tem now existing among the principal religious denominations 
and synods of this country. 

8. t/;iiforniity in the work by the use of same kind of charters, 
constitutions, rituals, and supplies in the subordinate bodies; 
the most systematic, united and organized efforts being neces- 
sary to hasten the hour of complete victory for the great temper- 
ance reform and enforce laws relating thereto. 



THE GOSPEL, THE VERT HEART OF SOCIAL 
REFORMS. 



The corresponding secretary of the Prison Asso- 
ciation of New York, Mr. W. M. F. Round, when 
at Saratoga some time since, attending the annual 
meeting of the American Social Science Association, 
found himself one evening talking with a venerable 
member of that body in the parlor of the hotel, 
while the association was holding a session in the 
adjoining hall. The secretary expressed some sur- 
prise that his friend should be absent from the meet- 
ing. He replied: "I stayed at home to read a book 
on social science that furnishes me with a solution of 
all the problems they discuss there." Nearly all 
the solutions that have been at all successful in deal- 
ing with pauperism, vice and crime, have uncoseious- 
iy acknowledged their dependence on that same book, 
the Bible, by the very mottoes they have adopted. 

The prison association itself prints on a promi- 
nent page of its pamphlets the words of Jesus: "I 
was in prison and ye came unto me. Secretary 
Rounds, in a recent article in the Hmnlletic Review, 
shows that while the population of New York State 
has increased "but about twenty per cent," since 
1880, the criminals have increased thirty-three per 
cent, a failure of our prison system which he at- 
tributes to the fact that it is not dominated by the 
principles of the Gospel. 

From the same book the Florence Night Mission 
takes its watchword. Visiting the low dens of New 
York with its missionary, I heard a young thief, 
when invited to its evening meeting, reply, "I work 
nights." Because so many of the devil's emploj'es 
and some good men "work nights," this mission has 
been organized for night work, chiefly among fallen 
women. On one of the pages of its report I find 
these words: "Let the wicked forsake his wa}', and 
the unrighteous man his thoughts; and let him turn 
unto the Lord and he will have mercy upon him; 
and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon." 

And the new "White Cross Army," whose work 
is the complement of that just mentioned, to encour- 
age puritj' of thought and word and deed in boys 
and young men, takes two of its mottoes from that 
book: "Keej) th3'self pure." "Blessed are the pure 
in heart for they shall see God." (Its pledge against 



smutty talk is not superfluous for some who are no 
longer young men.) 

The most successful temperance societies are those 
whose dependence upon the Christian Gospel are 
stamped into their very names, and proclaimed by 
ribbons which speak of the blood of Calvary, and 
the purity of the pardoned, and the peace of heaven. 

The most efficient assault yet made upon pauper- 
ism and other problems of poverty, that of charity 
organization societies, whose motto is, "Not alms, 
but a friend," is only an application, as the, Independ- 
ent has shown, of an acted parable of the same book, 
the story of Peter and John at the Gate Beautiful, 
where instead of giving the beggar the alms he 
sought they gave him a helping word and a helping 
hand to set him on his feet, a new man without and 
within and capable of self-support. 

London's best answer to the "bitter cry" of its 
j slums is a campaign of revival all along the line, in 
which the dignified regulars of the state church 
have copied, with variations, the tactics of the Sal- 
; vation Army, and sent their gowned procession of 
bishops, clergymen, and altar boys, singing litanies 
through their lowest streets, pausing often for pro- 
clamations of the Gospel. 

It is a very significant fact that though Free Re- 
ligionists at their conventions announce it as their 
lofty mission to provide "properly ventilated and 
drained houses," in reality not one of the fiftj'-cent 
pieces paid for the privilege of hearing these mis- 
sionary (?) addresses is heard from in the sanitary 
improvements of our cities. One New York society 
of Free Religionists has recently shown some inter- 
est in tenement house reform, good as far as it goes, 
but the superintendent of the city missions of New 
York, who knows more of its charitable work than 
an}' other man, is unable to name one charitable in- 
stitution in the city, of ten years standing, which 
was instituted and has been supported by those who 
reject the Bible. 

Mr. IngersoU raised a laugh among his shallow 
hearers recently by asking, in substance, if a man 
just come to town found himself in want, would he 
go for help to a Presbyterian deacon? 

It would have been appropriate to answer, "Per- 
haps not, if, like most infidels, he did not know 
enough about Christianity to be aware of the fact 
that deacons disburse the charitable ofierings of 
Christians, but he would surely have asked for a 
minister not for an infidel." One of the sad facts 
brought out by the recent biography of George Eli- 
ot, whose offences pain us like a sister's, is that she 
ceased the charitable work to which in her Christian 
days she had been devoted when she entered the 
Iceland of infidelity. What the London Atheneum 
calls "the great lapse that overshadowed her life to 
the end," could not have continued for a quarter of 
a century if she had not previously lapsed from her 
loyalty to the Bible. 

Those who reject the Bible are not only incapaci- 
tated for charitable work, but also for efficient serv- 
ice in the field of morals. At a recent club dinner, 
Mr. William Lloyd Garrison, son of the great eman- 
cipationist, in answer to the question, "What relig- 
ion can Liberals give their children?" said, "More 
than all else that troubles me in the ethical education 
of my children is the animalism that is engendered 
by materialistic thought. It would pain me little 
to have them embrace Calvinism with conscience, 
compared with entertaining liberal ideas and lax 
morals." 

Of the reform work and the four millions of dol- 
lars contributed annuall}' for charities in New York 
cit}', Free Religionists doubtless contribute some- 
thing as individuals, but the bulk of the work and 
the gifts are from those who have learned social sci- 
ence from the Bible, without whose support New 
York would have as meagre charities as cultured 
Rome, before the Gospel put hospitals in the place 
of arenas and stopped the wholesale abandonment of 
babes, and the worship of lust. 

All successful movements against pauperism, vice 
and crime, have, come at last to the Bible platform 
that permanent reform cannot be accomplished by a 
change of surroundings alone, by better clothes or 
better tenements, but onl}- by a change in the man 
himself, the displacing of the laziness, cowardice, 
appetite, and covetousness, which are the roots of 
degradation, b}' "work, education, kindness, indus- 
trial training in the public schools, and, most of all, 
the Gospel." "Make the tree good, and his fruit 
good." Matt. 12: 33. 

Mr. C. S. Wiugate, the eminent sanitary engineer, 
says that the surrounnings of the filthy and igno- 
rant in the slums are "foul and unhealthy, not more 
from necessit}' than from choice." This Ulyssian 
crew must be raised from piggishuess to manhood, 
or it is useless to remove them-from their pig pens to 
parlors. When Christ proclaimed his mission of 
charity to prisoners and unfortunates, the very foun- 



""q^^^WS 



s^ 



L^^rm 




THE CHRISTIAIT CYKOSTTKE. 



OCTOKER 1 5, 1885 



dation of his relief work was, "to preach the Gos- 
l.>el to the poor. " Luke 4: 17. 

At another time he said, "From within, out of the 
heart of men, pi-oceed evil thoughts, adulteries, for- 
nications, murders, thefts, covetousness, wickedness, 
deceit, laciviousness, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, 
foolishness." Since the disease is "within," there 
we must apply the remedy. — Bcv. Wllliur F. Crafts 
• •( the drion Signah 



EOS. RICEAHJ) BUSS OJV" SECBET SOClETIJiS. 



EXTKACTS FROM HIS rrBLISHED LETTEKS. 



wuY orrosE toe lodge. 

I see objections to secret societies, because, pursuing 
objects not known to the public, through means not 
known to the public, they act under diminished responsi- 
bilities to the public. If the objects be good, why not 
state them? if bad, they ought to be known. Our legis- 
lative halls are all open, and our courts; so are all the 
acts of our people, that may come to affect the interests 
of the body politic or social. Xot a bridge company, 
not a turnpike company, no bank, scarcely an association 
of any kind, for whatever purp.se existing, whether for 
the advancement of charity, or learning, or religion, or 
any of the common business of life, whether incorporated 
by the laws or not, but renders its statements to the pub- 
lic either voluntary or by command of the laws. If the 
latter do not positively enjoin publicity, a competent 
share of information regarding the objects of any such 
associations, is rarely or ever withheld, on proper inquiry 
being made. Societies, then, profoundly secret by the 
lirst element of their constitution, whatever their ostensi- 
ble ends, caunot be too closely watched, in a country 
whose primary principles of political and social action 
are all in the face of dav. 



the morg.Ov case 



A>"D THE DECLAKATION 

^E^'DE^•CE. 



The press on this occasion has fallen into stupefaction, 
or turpitude; for it cannot so utterly have lost its senses 
as not to know that the crime would never have been 
committed and left unavenged, but for the full and con- 
tinued existence, in our country, of the Masonic obliga- 
tion. No sophistry can gainsay this position. The evi- 
dence of it is flagrant; its foundation is upon a rock. Had 
a case like Morgan's arisen in 17 76; had blood been so 
atrociously shed, and gone so long unavenged, through 
any acts of the government then ruling us, or the black 
doings and subtle hidings of Masonry within its borders, 
I believe that it would have acted upon public opinion 
like an electric shock, and that our fathers would have 
sought no stronger cause for prostrating in the dust an 
open au horit}- or secret influence that could so iniqui- 
tously prostrate justice. Ami wrong? Do I aflirm too 
much? Am I giving way to feeling, in place of reason- 
ing? Xo! I speak under the highest of all sanctions, be- 
fore the American public. Turn to the Declaration of 
Independence, that glorious charter of our liberties, and 
see it it be not there recorded as one of the causes for dis 
membering an empire, that the British King, by his odi 
ous acts, had obstructed the administration of justice in 
our country. No single case, comparable in atrocity to 
this of ilorgaa's, whether as regards the original conspir- 
acy and murder, or the total obstruction of the laws since, 
ever disgraced the tyranny of that era over us. 

LODGE AGAINST LAW. 



I am in a field by itself. There my astonished sight be- 
holds two figures: the State, with the broken sceptre of 
the law in her hand, on one side, and Masonry, with a 
veil over her face, on the other. My vision is distinct 
though the spectacle is so portentious! I go not beyond 
the narrative thsrt presents it. Keeping to that, I am 
guarded against mistake or confusion. I have here im 
moveable ground under me. I take post as upon the ver- 
ity of a legal record. A few facts are all that I want, and 
these I have. I desire to render the case irresistible, by its 
concentration and its simplicity. I believe that Morgan 
was seized and carried from his home by Masons, and by 
Masons murdered. I believe that this was the result of a 
conspiracy, engendered and carried through, under cir- 
cumstances of peculiar deliberation, malignity and terror. 
Yet, to this very hour, the infamous deed remains unpun- 
ished. I have watched the pursuit of justice. I see how 
she is disheartened, fatigued, worn down, by efforts con- 
tinued throughout years, to clutch these worse than Cal- 
abrian banditti. I see her at fault: I see her countenance 
in despair. Ma.sons know the whole tale of blood. "Who 
can deny this? Masons conceal it. "Who can deny this? 
Can, then, any sentient, reasonable being say, that Ma- 
sonry is not at the bottom of the evil? True, these are 
depraved Masons who act in this manner, and I do not 
mean to judge all other Masons by them; but Masonry, 
corporate, e.-<istent Masonry, is the root. The abandoned 
fiends of the order, who know the truth, conceal it on 
system. They are wicked through principle. They con- 
found crime with virtue; murder with Masonic merit. 
Like imps of pandemonium, they rejoice and dance in 
their sin. 

How, gentlemen, can my zeal in Antimasonry abate? 
I take from one of the letters of "William Penn, the great 
founder of this Commonwealth, the following sentence: 
"that a goternrnent is free to the peopU under it, wJi^n they 
are party to the laws, and irJien the laws yovern." This is 
a fine axiom in a republic, expressed with clearness and 
brevity. But who can say that the laws govern while 
Masonry exists? True, that in a thousand cases occurring 
all around us, the administration of law goes fairly on, 
and we never hear of Masonry obstructing it, or arythin" 



about M.isonry; why, then, it may be asked, any ,alarm 
about it? But what does this prove more than that it is 
harmless, as long as its belligerent spirit is not called out; 
but excite that spirit, tell the secrets of the institution, 
bring it, by any meami. into contlici with the laws, and who 
that has examined the case of Morgan but must see it is 
stronger than the laws? Hence Anti-masonry. 

OXE DEGREE ENOUGH EOK MR. RUSH. 

!Many years ago I became an "entered apprentice," went 
to a lodge once — and but once. On my return from Eng- 
land, afFer an absence in the service of the United States, 
I voluntarily withdrew from the body, by a letter to that 
effect. My separation from it was in 1836, before the 
murder of Morgan was known to me, and had no connec- 
tion with the just indignation which that deed excited 
among a portion of the citizens of New York. 

THE RE.^SOX FOR THE AMERICAN PARTY. 

The only concern that society at large can have with 
Masonry politically, is on the ground of its doing a posi- 
tive injury to society. "What its predilections may incite 
it to cherish in theory or enact in practice, within its own 
walls, those outside need not care about. Let it employ 
itself as any other benevolent, or festive, or theological 
brotherhood, if any or all such it constitutes, with its own 
duties and pastimes, as long as it keeps within its own 
limits. But the line must never be passed. It exists per- 
missively, under the license of society. The continuance 
of its charter depends upon its innocent conduct. This 
must be unequivocal and invariable. There must be no 
exception collaterally, any more than directly. The mo- 
ment it is discovered that persons belonging to this broth- 
erhood can conspire against the liberty and life of a citi- 
zen who had broken no law of the land, but merely some 
of its own edicts, and when these persons can escape de- 
tection by persuading themselves that the voluntary oaths 
and other self-assumed obligations which bind them to 
the brotherhood are of higher authority than the laws, no 
matter under what mistaken notions of those oaths and 
obligations they act, from that moment the whole institu- 
tion, from which such rank delusions and tremendous 
perils proceed, assumes a new relation to society. It is 
placed in the attitude of an aggressor. It rides over the 
laws. It is guilty; constructively if you will, but obvious- 
ly and legally guilty. 

Hooker, personifying law, eloquently exclaims, "her 
seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the 
world; everything on earth does her homage, the highest 
as not beyond her control, the least as claiming her pro- 
tection." Masonry has overset this primordial system. 
She has dethroned this image of God upon earth. To re- 
instate it over so insolent a victor, we must have a politi- 
cal organization. There is no other way of assaulting, 
there is no other hope of vanquishing, there need be no 
other dream of humbling such a foe. It fights with des- 
peration. It murdered Morgan by force of its oatns; it 
beat down the law by force of its oaths; and, like any 
other murderer on trial for life, it will resort to every 
means that these same oaths can engender, to escape the 
doom it deserves. It is itself an organization the most 
tremendous, and for political as well as other purposes, 
when it may see fit to aim at them, though this, as many 
things besides, be kept out of its written code. It is, 
therefore, incontestibly proper to attack it politically. 

MASONRY AND MURDER. 

The Rev. Dr. Cathcart, of York, a learned and enlight- 
ened clergyman, kept an account of all the murders in the 
United States in 1831, and found that they amounted, as 
far as he could ascertain, to one hundred and 7iine. The 
fear is that this list fell below rather than exceeded the 
truth, as he put down none of which he had not an ac- 
count Others may have been committed that escaped 
him; but his aggregate, which I must add did not include 
those of the Southampton insurrection, or the individuals 
killed in the public affray in Rhode Island, probably ex- 
ceeds the whole number of murders in both France and 
England for that year. The number in the latter coun- 
try for *e»«?(. years, ending with 1830, appears by their 
parliamentary returns, to have been one hundred and three 
or about fifteen for each year. What American, solicitous 
for the reputation of his country, but must feel deeply at 
a difference so amazing; however, the sum total of all 
other offenses may place those in our land at a lower 
point in the comparison. I do not charge Masonry with 
swelling up this appalling amount of murders, because it 
murdered Morgan; but I say unequivocally, and I say it 
careless of fresh abuse, that if any one thing could tend 
more than another to lessen the salutary horror with 
which that highest of crimes ought ever to be regarded in 
every community, it was the behavior of our ptressex un- 
der the murder of Morean. 



Refoem News. 



NEWHAMPSHIRE NOTICE. 



CHANGE OF TIME. 

Owing to the meeting of the N. H. A. C. Conference 
at Concord, Oct 21-25, the annual meeting of the N. H. 
Christian Association is deferred one week, to Oct. 27, 
28, and 29, in the Advent church at East Rochester. El- 
der H. L. Hastings of Boston, and Elder Isaac Hyatt of 
Gilford Village are among our speakers. Full pro- 
gramme will be published as soon as possible. 

A. H. Li\.MPREY, Pres. 

S. C. KtMBALL, Sec'y. 

INDIANA. 

The Indiana Christian Association opposed to secretism 
will meet at Fairmount, Grant county, Indiana, October 
20, at 7 I". M., and continue sessions till the evening of 
the 22d. David Marshal will represent the Friends' 
church. Halleck Floyd, Rev. Z. McNew, and Rev. J. P. 
Stoddard are expected, also many others who will address 
the meeting have promised to attend. Respectfully, 

S. L. Cook, 



OHIO NO TIG E. 



The committee appointed at the late meeting of the 
Ohio Christian Association, held at Cedarville to arrange 
for a State Lecturer who should spend at least two months 
in the field prior to the meeting that is to be held at Co- 
lumbus, beginning Dec. 15, have chosen Mr. "W. B. Stod- 
dard, who has labored with success for the past two years 
in the State of New York. He begins his work in Ohio 
the 15th of October. "Will the friends of the cause care- 
fully notice his announcements and freely correspond 
with him in regard to the work? S. A. George, 

Cor. Sec'y 0. G. A. 



FROM THE GENERAL AGENT. 



Altona, III., Oct. 5, 1885. 

On Friday evening, the 2d inst., I attended a 
gathering of the young people in Bro. Lindehlad's 
church and obtained a few subscribers for the Cyno- 
sure. I reached G-alva Saturday morning, and call- 
ing on Rev. Mr. Borg, found that arrangements were 
completed and notices given in the papers for me to 
speak in the vSwedish Lutheran church on Tuesday 
and "Wednesday evenings. Spending a few hours 
with my sister and friends, I came on to this place 
at ;3*r. M., and was heartily welcomed by Bro. Abra- 
hamson, who was at the time suffering with a severe 
attack of sick headache, and was on that account 
unable to attend the evening meeting. I learned 
with regret that our true and efficient helper, Geo. 
]). Mackintosh, was absent, but soon found Bro. 
Hubbell, whose invitation to spend the night at his 
house I gladly accepted. The pastor of the Congre- 
gational church received" me kindly and was, I no- 
ticed, with his wife in the evening congregation. 

Saturday evening was not favorable for attend- 
ance from the country on account of a slight rain- 
fall and "thick darkness," but there were present I 
should judge nearly a hundred and twentj'-flve per- 
sons, to whom I spoke for an hour. The M. E. 
church here has for the past year been supplied by 
a professor from Hedding College, Abingdon, on 
whom I called just before time for the Sabbath 
morning service, 8.nd whose invitation to preach I 
accepted. The audience was not large, but very at- 
tentive, and I regretted not being able to remain to 
"class meeting" on account of an engagement nine 
miles away in Wataga at 2:30 i*. m. 

The attendance at "Wataga was good, and I was 
much encouraged to see the deep interest and full 
attendance in the Sabbath school that was in session 
when we arrived. This is one of pastor Abraham- 
son's mission outposts, and is in a prosperous con- 
dition, and has a very commodious house of wor- 
ship. 

A brisk ride of eighteen miles behind a fleet horse 
in the bracing air gave me an excellent relish for the 
cup of tea and a "No. 1" lunch that sister Abraham- 
son had thoughtfully provided, and I went to the 
work of the evening feeling "good as new." The 
choir sang "with the spirit and with the understand- 
ing" apparently, and after prayer and reading 2d 
Thessalonians 2: 7-12, I spent an hour and a half 
endeavoring to show that a man could not be a 
Christian and a true Freemason or Odd-fellow at the 
same time. The attention was marked and the or- 



MASONRY AND POLITICS. 

The defenders of Masonry allege that it is not political. 
"Where do they suppose our senses to have fled when they 
say so? It may not be political by its express constitution, 
or any of its formal rules, but if it be not so in fact — it it 
be not so by its influence— there is no truth under heaven. 
It can van((nish the law, and silence the press, yet it is not 
political! It can tower over the first, which holds the body 
politic togethei' — it can stop the second, by which the 
yjolitical universe is moved— yet it is not political! ! This 
is to mock, not reason with us; it takes us for blocks— | 
stones — not able to see what is before our eyes. And , 
smce Masonry has already done all that I have enumerated , "^'^^ P^'^"^®'^''- 

who Eo dull in thought or willful in infatuation, as not to One incident I should have mentioned. At the 
feel sure that it will, in some form or other, go on with its close of my remarks on Saturday' evening a gentle- 
foul transgressions as occasion may incite, if ])ermitted man who had taken seven degrees and was a "Royal 
longer to have foothold in the land. I thence lay it down Arch" at one time, came forward to correct one er- 



with a confidence that in my mind admits of no qualifica 
tion, that the multiplied and proven dangers of Masonry, 
render the effort for its extirpation the hitchest public duty 
which our citizens can be summoned to perform at the 
approaching election of a President. 



ror which I had inadvertently made in giving the 
ritual of the first degree. I had quoted from Mack- 
ey's Ritualist, page 22: "There he stands on the 
■ * threshold of this new Masonic life," etc., 



October 15, 1885 



THE CHBISTIAN CYNOSTJBE. 



which as he understood I gave as part of the initia- 
tory ceremony; with this exception he said my rep- 
resentations were correct. I am encouraged by the 
hearty approval of pastor A. and other friends of 
the work thus far, and trust that this evening's gath- 
ering may be more largely attended and spiritual 
and heli^ful to the pastor in his work than any pre- 
ceding. 

Galva, Oct. 8. — My third and last meeting at Al- 
tona was a better one than the two preceding, 
though the rain kept many from the country awaj'. 
Bro. Abrahamson showed me every possible kindness 
and will present our cause and give his people an 
opportunity to aid in its support next Sabbath morn- 
ing. This I find a very needy field, though so far 
as the American population is concerned not as hope- 
ful as could be desired. I was glad to see the faces 
of several friends of olden times in the audience the 
first evening, and among them E,ev. Mr. Harrah, with 
prominent members of his church. Here, as ft Al- 
tona and Moline, dark and unpleasant weather pre- 
vailed, greatly diminishing the attendance from the 
regions round about; but all things considered, the 
audience was fair and the attention good. 

Yesterday I spent with one of the pioneers, who, 
if she was not my mother, i would mention as a note- 
worthy exception to the common infirmities of our 
"fast age." In her 91st year, she retains her memo- 
ry and faculties in great clearness, and when we were 
out calling, she would enter and alight from the car- 
riage unaided with more ease and expedition than 
many who were born half a century after she began 
to spin and weave in her New England home. 

Last evening the churches held their regular prayer- 
meeting services, which doubtless accounted for the 
absence of some, but there was very little vacant 
space in the audience room, and those present re- 
mained for two hours without any apparent diminu- 
tion of interest. When opportunity was given by 
the pastor for any who desired to aid in our work 
there was a cheerful response; and judging from the 
number of small coins the oft'ering was general as 
well as liberal. I felt that not only a good work had 
been done in Galva, but as a gentleman present from 
a neighboring town subscribed for the Cynosure, its 
weekly visits for one year may prepare the way for 
light to enter that place of lodge darkness. 

Bro. Abrahamson's congregation meet in the larg- 
est house of worship in Altoona, but finding it al- 
ready too small for their growing membership they 
are talking and jjlanning for a new structure. The 
present membership is reported at 490. 

Bro. Borg's house of worship is not as large as 
some others in Galva, but is neat and substantially 
built of brick, with ample ground for enlargement. 
He reports a present membership of 140. 

Both these pastors are radical temperance men, 
though Bro. Abrahamson is hoping more from the 
Republican party than the facts seem to warrant. 
There is one feature noticeable in all these Swedish 
Lutheran anti-lodge churches, viz: they contain about 
the natui'al proportion of male and female members. 
Pastors in lodge-harboring churches often tell me 
that they fail to i-each the younger men, and that the 
pra^^er meeting, if not the church roll, is almost en- 
tirely made up of old men and women, and it is re- 
freshing to find a people who are not dependent on 
the '■'■rejected material" of the lodges for attendants 
and workers in the church. When these men be- 
come more thoroughly instructed they will speak 
with the voice and votes of freemen in tones that 
will penetrate even the deaf ears of political dema- 
gogues. 

The Swedish Mission movement has not met with 
the hoped-for success either in Altona or Galva as 
yet. In both these towns they have houses of wor- 
ship which are, I am told, unoccupied at present. 

J. P. Stoddard. 



TO TEE FRIENDS IN OHIO. 

Chicago, 111., Oct. 10, 1885. 

Dear Friends: — By the time this will reach you, I 
will, D. v., be in your State prepared for work, and I 
want you to get just as much as you can, while I am 
with you. 

You will see a notice of my appointment in this 
paper. I take this opportunity to thank those 
of you who have so nobly assisted in the past, and 
ask your co-operation in the present, which I am sure 
you will give. If you do, and we all take hold of 
the work together, there is no reason why we should 
not see the cause of God and humanity advanced, 
and the powers of darkness driven back. 

1 shall go immediately to Columbus, as this is the 
place you have designated for your State meeting to 
be held Dec. 15th, next. I shall hope to see all the 
friends in the neighboring towns and speak whenev- 
er you can find a church or school-house open for the 
truth on this question. If you have a Mason in 



your community who is "willing to debate the ques- 
tion on any moral or religious ground, I will meet 
him at any suitable place for such discussion. 

Will Robert Boyd of Reynoldsburg, 

Rev. George Richey of Pataskala, 

John Swickard of Hope, 

Mrs. L. L. Ducher of Lewis Center, 

F. M. Gardner of New California, 

I. S. Williams of Ostrander, 

E. Pfeiffer of Delaware, 

J. B. Lyons of Mt. Gilead, 

L. Powers of Ashley, 

D. Marshman of Cosica, 

John Finney of Ontario, and Abraham Cox of 
Gallon, each consider themselves a committee of one, 
to see what can be done in their several towns? 

Will all who are ready for lecturers or who may 
desire them later, in any part of the State, write me 
immediately, so that I may be able to arrange a se 
ries of lectures without going over the ground twice. 
Please state the time that will be the most conven- 
ient. 

My address will, until further notice, be at Co- 
lumbus, Franklin county, Ohio. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



FROM TEE KANSAS AGENT. 

Oct. 6, 1885. 

Dear Editor: — Having attended the State Con- 
vention in Iowa at West Branch, and the Kansas 
State Convention at Willis, after leaving the lectur- 
er's conference at Wheaton, I did not get home till 
the 5th of September, and have by various things 
been hindered, so I did not get into the lecture work 
till the 27th of September. Since then I have been 
at work, preaching once, lecturing twice. I failed to 
get a hearing at one other place, on account of a 
cold rain just at the time for gathering. 

On Sabbath evening last I spoke on the Religion 
of Freemasonrjf at Strawberry school-house, showing 
from Masonic authority, and the Christian Bible, 
that there is an eternally uncompromising antagon- 
ism existing between the Masonic science of religion 
(as Mackey terms it,) and the Christian system; and 
that the abominations spoken of in Ezekiel 8th chap- 
ter, degree below degree, of still greater and greater 
darkness, in the worship of ^Hhe sun toward the East," 
was the great ideal from which the symbols of mod- 
ern Freemasonry were copied. As Mackey says: 
"Many, indeed all of the Masonic symbols of the pres- 
ent day, can only be thoroughly comprehended and 
properly appreciated by this reference to sun tcorship." 

Quite an interest was manifested after the lecture, 
and I am pressingly invited to come again, and also 
to speak in another school-house about three miles 
east, and some material aid is promised. 

I have spoken to some at every place in regard to 
a county organization, and the idea was favorably 
received by all. I shall make a vigorous eflbrt after 
our (U. B.) conference, which meets at our church 
to-morrow, to get a Washington county anti-secrecy 
organization effected. I think of trying, where I 
have two or more appointments for evening lectures, 
to have day appointments for prayer, conference and 
inquiry. Pray for me that the Lord may direct and 
give increase. R. Loogan. 



The next week I spent in distributing Anti-mason- 
ic literature, and in attending the Annual Confer- 
ence of the Iowa Wesleyan Methodists. Upon the 
cars I met a pastor who does not teach separation 
from the lodge to Christ, but contents himself with 
warning the lodge men not to attempt to climb by 
the Masonic ladder to heaven. I earnestly improved 
the time in teaching him the way of the Lord more 
perfectly. 

Twice I addressed the Wesleyan conference on the 
subject of our reform. This conference passed a 
resolution approving of the proposed National Con- 
vention of Christians and churches opposed to secret 
societies and elected delegates to the coming con- 
vention. 

Sabbath morning I preached a sermon in the 
United Brethren church on the ability of Christ U) 
save, in which I exposed the lying pretensions of the 
lodge to fit men, by Masonic methods, for heaven. 
In the evening I preached before the Wesleyan 
Conference on Christ the only way to God as op- 
posed to the false wa3's of Satan as taught hy the 
lodge men, and urged upon the pastors the duty of 
faithfully instructing and warning the people. I ex- 
pect the hearty co-operation of the Free and Wesley- 
an Methodists in the work of Christian reform. 
Christ expects every friend of his to stand with him 
in this contest with the Masonic auti-Christ. Christ 
claims to be the only waj' to God; Masonry rejects 
Christ by teaching another way to heaven. If any 
man does that, says the inspired Paul, "let him be ac- 
cursed." C. F. Hawf.ey. 



IOWA. 



BRO. HAVt'LEY's FAITH AND ZEAL. 



Dear Cynosure: — On Wednesday, the 23rd of 
September, I came to Quasqueton, in Buchanan coun- 
ty. The second night I exposed the deistical and 
Satanic character of the lodge religion and defended 
the claim of Christ to be the one only name by which 
we can be saved. Here I met my old friend John 
Merrill. I formed his acquaintance when engaged 
in revival work in Buchanan county twenty-seven 
years ago. He is a veteran reformer and was de- 
lighted with the truth, and anxious that it should be 
preached at his regular place of worship which is 
several miles distant from Quasqueton. 

Sabbath, the 27th, I preached morning and even- 
ing in the village of Walker. Here, also, I exposed 
the Satanic methods of salvation taught by the lodge, 
and preached Christ and his atoning blood as the 
only way to God. The Sabbath evening sermon was 
preached in the Free Methodist church. The pastor 
heartily sympathizes with our reform work, and the 
brethren joyfully received the truth; as did the Wes- 
leyan Methodist friends to whom I preached in the 
morning. 

It is, however, but a few years since the misguided 
friends of tlie lodge in this place replied to my argu- 
ments against the validity of the Masonic oaths with 
eggs and stones. But ttiey must have felt that those 
methods were neither convincing nor winning, and 
so listened in silence this time. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



— Bro. A. H. Springstein has removed from War- 
ren, Michigan, to Wayne, Wayne county, in the 
same State. Correspondents will please note the 
change and send for him to lecture. 

— Rev. W. T. Gordon of Albany, Missouri, bro- 
ther-in-law of Bro. M. N. Butler, having been com- 
pelled to give up the ministry, for the time being, 
because of the failure of his eyesight, is about en- 
gaging in business in this city. He reports as 
strong determination as ever against the lodge in 
Northwestern Missouri, Init at present little acti-sity 
in their opposition. 

— Rev. T. L. Wilkinson, editor of the Iconoclast of 
Brantford, province of Ontario (now changed to the 
Golden Rule, Parkdale, Ont.), has been called to 
pass through the deep waters of affliction. During 
the last of August his youngest child, a sweet little 
girl of about seven years, was attacked with diph- 
theria. The disease was quickly fatal. The five 
older children were also prostrated immediately, and 
soon the father. In a few days a hoy of about ten 
was taken and then a girl of sixteen. Thus bereft 
of half their little flock Bro. Wilkinson and his de- 
voted wife have taken up again the labor of life 
with a sorrow whose depths their own hearts alone 
can fathom, yet sustained and comforted by the 
presence of Him who gave and who taketh away, 
whose name they bless out of the gloom of their 
trial. The readers of the Cynosure, who have be- 
come acquainted with this brother through extracts 
made from his paper, will join us in this expression 
of tenderest sympathy for the bereaved famil}'. 

— Bro. Edward Mathews visited the Illinois Free 
Methodist Conference meeting in Chicago last week. 
Our readers have been informed from time to time 
of his trial in Coldwarter, Michigan, for compelling 
an officer to show his warrant for the arrest of a 
brother minister. The judge, at first apparently 
prejudiced against Bro. Mathev/s, before the close 
of the trial as the facts came out showed plainly his 
change of conviction, and reserved the sentence for 
some^days after the report of the jury. The case 
will be appealed, but Bro. Mathews is a poor preach- 
er and has little means to spend in the trial. Some 
of his many friends who read the Cijnosure can do 
good with their money in this way. 

. The Association for the Advancement of Wo- 
men met at Des Moines, Iowa, on the afternoon of 
Oct. 7th. The attendance was large and iuclud ed 
many of the most noted women of the nation. 
Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, as president, made the open- 
in o- address. This was followed by an essay on 
"The Work of the World's Women," by Mrs. Wol- 
cott, of Massachusetts. Miss Francis E. Willard, 
of Illinois, then ably sketched the plan of success- 
fully organi?:ed work as illustrated by the methods 
of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 
Amono- the distinguished guests reported as present 
were Mrs. Emma C. Bascom, of Wisconsin; Dr. Ju- 
lia H. Smith, of Chicago; Mrs. Abby W. May, of 
Boston; Mrs. Clara B. Colby, of Nebraska. 



X 



■.^9*^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSDTHE. 



October 15, 1885 



CORiRESPrNDEIfCE. 



LOTAL ryiTED BRETRREX TO THE RESCUE. 

Dear Brethren in the Lord: 

One of oiir vital principles is assailed by a crafty 
foe. "To the breach, dear friends I" Our Surnp- 
ter has been fired on and many are ready to sacri- 
fice ••the ancient landmark, which thy fathers have 
set."" For the sake of peace, and the false notion — 
that ••perhaps they"ll do more harm than good." many 
of our good brethren are deceived, and are willing 
to compromise. Let us organize in the name of 
the Loni of Hosts, that "the" weak hands may be 
strengthened, and the feeble knees confirmed." 
••Say to them that are of a fearful heart: Be strong. 
fear not, behold your G-od will come with ven- 
geance, even God with a recompense: he will come 
and save you.'" Let us organize that we may pre- 
sent an unbroken fi^ont to the foe. "SVhy shall not 
our every conference be represented in ••The Confer- 
ence of Churches".'"" Let our classes organize into a 
Defence Assoc-iation and elect a delegate to meet del- 
egates from every charge on each presiding elder's 
district at some central point on the district: to be 
known as the District Convention of Consti- 
tutional United Brethren in Christ. After transact- 
ing business for the sustentation of our Constitution, 
let them elect four delegates from their district (of 
prei'chers or laymen or both) to meet similar dele- 
gates from the other districts throughout the church 
at a convenient point That convention to direct 
the constitutional organization for the church. I al- 
so suggest, that as soon as possible after the preach- 
er is assigned, that the constitutional brethren of 
that field wait upon him, and should he declare for 
the Weaver wing, or is weak on the question, that 
the amount that he would get if loyal from each 
member be put into a common fund to fight this evil. 
Brethren, dallying now means weakening of our 
cause. I understand that since the passing of the 
lodge-appeasing act by our last General Conference, 
a member of the class 1 lead has joined the G. A. R. 
and we are powerless to help ourselves. 

Exchange ideas, brethren. J. C. Young. 



HA LF-WAY ANTI-MASON. 



Seymour Lake, N. Y. 

Editor Ct-Vostre: — Dear Brother. There was 
in the Cynosure of Sept 17th, a sharp reproof to 
correspondents, which, if I listened to the human 
instead of the divine, I would dare not pen these 
lines. "What God wants me to write, that I write; 
if it goes into the waste basket I have done my 
duty. 

I find many men who cry aloud against Masonry; 
they can tell off from the first to the third degree, 
and point out many of the evils contained therein; 
tell us how Masonry is corrupting society, demoral- 
izing the churches, corrupting our government, — in 
fact they have the outward form of a zealous Anti- 
mason. But ask one of them for a dollar to help 
on the cause, or a few dollars to help some poor se- 
ceder out of trouble — Oh how soon their counte- 
nance will change; their zeal collapse. 

Now what we want in the Anti-masonic ranks is 
men filled with the Holy Ghost, endowed with pow- 
er from on high: then the good work will go on. It 
is only through the power of God that Freemasonry 
will ever be put down. Give us men filled with the 
spirit of Christ, who are all consecrated to the work, 
then the Masonic kingdom will totter. Men whose 
pocket-books are open for the cause prove their faith. 
God help the National Christian As.sociation and 
keep it pure. D. Ben.iamin. 



AN INVITATION TO LECTURERS. 



Lexington, III. 
In this vicinity where the secret orders have full 
sway, controling everything, the churches included, 
we much need the assistance of an able worker in 
our midst About one year ago folder Browne spent 
a few days with us, visiting in town and c-ountry. 
The weather being unfavorable we made no attempt 
to get up an audience. Brother Hinman .sfjent two 
weeks with us in November, visiting the same ground 
over, doing a noble work. He lectured twice in 
Lexington and had a small, but attentive audience. 
At Selma he gave two lectures, and had quite a re- 
spectable audience; and he spoke once in the country 
where we met with the greater encouragement but it 
rained so that the people could not get out. Now if 
there is any place on the earth where the subject of 
secretism should be agitated and its evils revealed, 
it is McLean county, Illinois, in Lexington especial- 
ly. I can give so little encouragement that 1 hardly 
dare ask or expect further aid from the N. C. A.; 
but in case there should be a lecturer passing by, or 



near this place and will favor us with a call, sooner 
or later, I'll meet them at the depot, will convey them 
around, and will entertain them while they see 
tit to remain. Twelve or fifteen years ago Bro. C. 
A. Blanchard lectured here, aud he gave the frater- 
nity such a stirring up that the Masous allude fre- 
quently to it I have some acquaintance with Bro. 
Stoddard, but it is not for me to dictate who, but 
will say, send a good one or none, as the prejudice is 
bitter against us here. Yoiu's in the work. 

Wm. D. Johnston. 



PITH AND POINT. 



THE G. .\. R., .^ND THE KUM POWER. 

The following record is from the Era of Bradford, 
Pennsylvania, of Sept 39th, 1885: 

"G. A. R. Resolutions. — At a meeting of Bradford 
Post, No. 141, Dep't. of Pa., G. A. R , held last Wednes- 
day evening, the following resolution was adopted: Re- 
solved, that the thanks of the Post are due and are hereby 
tendered to Messrs. A. Mayer &Co., for their generous 
gift of the life-like bust of our late commander and com- 
rade, General U. S. Grant; and that Post 141 will ever 
hold them in grateful remembrance for the gift. By order, 
R. A. Dempsby, Commander. 

Chas. F. Cummings, Adjutant. 

A. Mayer & Co. are wholesale liquor dealers in Brad- 
ford, and the query is, how much did the G. A. R. action 
in Maine soften the hearts of these liquor men? How 
many dollars will Post 141 put into A. Meyer's coffers? 

J. T. Y. 

A widow's mite and blessing. 

I wish I was able to tend you much more, but am glad 
to be able to help you a little in the good work of sending 
the Cynosure South. It is surely God's messenger and he 
win bless its truths to those who receive and read it. May 
God's blessing be upon all who are working in this re 
form. — Mrs. M. W. Bingham, Mallet Creek, 0. 

HOW stands dr. LEONARD? 

Please allow me to ask through your valuable paper if 
the Prohibition candidate for Governor of Ohio, Dr Leon- 
ard, is a member of either the Odd-fellows or Freema- 
sons? My reason for asking the above question is I will 
not knowingly vote for a man for offlce that belongs to 
either of those orders. I do not consider a man after tak- 
ing such oaths as a fit man to hold offlce. He is in dan- 
ger of being placed in a situation where he would be 
compelled to violate one or the other of the oaths he has 
taken. We have no American ticket in our State, or I 
would not think of voting any other. I think the Cy 
7io«Mr6 the best paper printed.— T. W. Stewart, Belle- 
center, Ohio. 

Dr. Leonard, we understand, is not a Freemason, but 
joined the Odd-fellows years ago. How much interest he 
takes in the lodge we know not, but hope little or none. 
Members of the nominating convention raised the ques- 
tion of his lodge affiliation, and we believe were satisfied 
with his present standing. Write to him and learn direct- 
ly how he stands. 



Bible Lessons. 



important work. The third verse gives one prime reason 
for this general apathy, "the high places were not taken 
away." Just iu proportion as these high places were fre- 
quented the temple worship declined. In our own day 
there is the same rivalry between these man-chosen shrines 
and the house of God. Any standard Masonic writer will 
inform us that the lodge always meets in an upper room 
to copy the example of their ancient brethren who met 
to worship on hills. Thus we have in our midst literal 
"high places" on which are expended the money, the in- 
terest, the affection which should be given to the church. 
As a consequence "the breaches of the Lord's house" 
grow larger and larger, and even our Jehoiadas seem to 
have no conception of the real cause. A complete tear- 
ing down of these high places would have saved such a 
tax on the king's patience. The honesty of the master 
workmen shows that this was indeed a revival of national 
righteousness such as our own nation sadly needs. It is 
time that moral issues should be brought to the front. 
Politics divorced from religion and morals, will grow like 
stagnant waters — a fountain of public corruption infect- 
ing all officials from the highest to the lowest. 
LIGHT FROM THE WORD. 
Why is early training so important? Pr. 22: 6. Were 
high places ever used for true worship? Gen. 21: 33. 
What made them sinful? Num. 33: 52. 



FOURTH QUARTER. 

STUDIES IN THE KINGS AND PROPHETS. 
LESSON IV. Oct. 25, 1885.— The Temple Repaired. 2 Kings 
12: 1-15. 

GOLDEN TEXT.— I was glad when they said unto me, Let us 
go into the house of the Lord. Ps. 122: 1. 
\Open the Bible artd read the le.<ismi.'[ 

COMMENTS ON THE LESSON BY E. E. FLAGG. 

1. Children trained in the fear of Ood will make God- 
fearing rulers, vs. 1, 3. The young king Joash is a fine 
example of the value of early training. There is no 
reason to suppose that with the blood of the house of 
Ahab in his veins he would have turned out better than 
the kings who preceded him had it not been for that 
combination of circumstances which made the good Je- 
hoiada the sole guardian and teacher of his childish years. 
Our greatest national danger lies in the fact that such a 
large proportion of our children and youth are allowed 
to grow up without any moral or religious education worth 
the name. The virtues of the Puritan age have become 
nearly extinct in our public men, simply because the Pur- 
itan home with its strict discipline and daily grounding 
of the children in Bible truth, has become almost obso- 
lete. Perhaps no reformation is more needed than one 
which shall begin at our own firesides in a revival of the 
old-fashioned home training. 

2. A true reformation will beyin at Ood'a home. vs. 3- 
15. In the great national declension, the temple had 
been suffered to fall into a state of general neglect and 
dilapidation. Joash perceived the duty of repairing the 
sacred edifice, strange as it seems, 'nefore Jehoiada did, 
and issued a command that a n%tional subscription should 
be taken up for this purpose, yet at the end of twenty- 
three years not the first step had been taken towards this 



"Began to reign." When he was seven years old (2 
Chron. 24: 1). He was the eighth king of Judah, and 
son of Ahaziah, and hence a great grandson of Ahab. For 
many years Joash was naturally very much under the in- 
fluence of Jehoiada; and during this period his reign was 
an excellent and prosperous one. The very first act of 
Jehoiada, in the king's name, was to bind the people to 
the abolishment of the worship of Baal, and the restora 
tion of the worship of Jehovah. In the excitement of the 
revolution, the people, iu a great mob flew to the temple 
of Baal, and tore it down and killed its priest. Forthwith 
Jehoiada, in the king's name, re organized the temple ser- 
vice, so that his worship, which had been falling into de- 
cay through three reigns, might be conducted iu a more 
fitting manner. But the building itself had become ruin- 
ous, owing to neglect and the depredations which had been 
made upon it by idolaters and invaders. The king there- 
fore early directed his attention to its restoration. — Todd. 
"But the high places." The unlawful altars of Jeho- 
vah built in groves upon hilltops. The Israelities found 
that all prominent points had been consecrated by the for- 
mer inhabitants for idol worship, and they used the same 
localities in the Jehovah worship The idol worship was 
full of the vilest impurity, and it was perhaps impossible 
to worship Jehovah purely amidst the suggestions of the 
former impurity which those high places called up. There- 
fore there were strict commands to destroy them (Lev. 
26: 30; Num. 33: 53; Deut. 33:29) —ScArtjf. 

"Were not taken away." (1) Perhaps the king and the 
high priest did not realize that these were forbidden. (2) 
The true God was worshiped upon them, although in a 
wrong way. (3) Possibly they were unable to take them 
away, — or feared to go farther in their reforms than they 
had already done, lest they excite revolts among the peo- 
ple. — Pelouhet. The popular fondness for the private and 
disorderly rites performed in the groves and recesses of 
hills was so inveterate that even the most powerful mon- 
archs had been unable to accomplish their suppression. — 
J., F. and B. 

"The need of reformation." God's spiritual temple, the 
church, is sometimes neglected and needs reformation. 
That money, and time, and thought, which should be de- 
voted to religion and the spread of the Gospel, is trans- 
ferred to the temple of Mammon. Prayer and the read- 
ing of the Bible declines, in private, and in the family; 
meetings are poorly attended; few are invited to Christ; 
worldliness prevails. — Pelouhet. 

"The priests had not repaired the breaches." It is not 
common for people to be very enthusiastic in spending 
for the public good the income they need themselves, 
when those for whom it is done will not give their part. 
Then there was the difficulty of determining what part of 
the money should be appropriated to the repairs, and what 
to the support of the priests and the ordinary temple ex- 
penses. In truth Joash had set the priests a hard task; he 
required them to take the funds for repairing out of their 
own income, and the}' not unnaturally found difficulty in 
settling the proportions — Tayler Lewis. If they had 
trusted God and the people more, and repaired the tem- 
ple, more income would have come in. People are not 
apt to give freely where all that is given is absorbed in 
the expenses of the collection. They must see worthy re- 
sults of their self-denial to stimulate their benevolence. — 
Pel. 

"And the priests . . . put therein all the money." A 
contribution box should always be ore of the attractions 
of the Lord's house. We ought to goto church to give as 
well as to get. Praying and singing in a church mean 
but little from a person who is unwilling to give anything 
into the Lord's treasury. In making choice of a church 
home, it is well to look out for one where the contribu- 
tion-box is always open and always prominent. — H. C. 
Trumbull. 

"They reckoned not with the men." For they trusted 
implicitly in their honesty. But this work has a strange 
anding. Joash himself in his later years not only favored 
idolatry, but took from the temple the very treasures he 
had placed there with the surplus money, and gave tnem 
as a bribe to Hazael, the king of Syria (2 Kings 12:17, 
18). 



October 15, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSTJKES. 



ANTI-MASONIC LECTURERS. 

Generai, Agent and Lectxjker, J. P. 
Stoddard, 231 West Madison street, Chi 
cago. 

H. H. Hinman, Willimaatic, Conn. 
State Agents. 

Illinois, Geo. T. Dissette, Cynosure of- 
fice. 

Indiana, S. L. Cook of Albion 

Mich., A. H. Springstein, Wayne. 

Missouri, M. N. Butler, Burlington June. 

Minn., J. P. Richards, care Prof. Paine, 
Wasioja. 

New York, W. B. Stoddard, Dale. 

Wisconsin, Isaac Bancroft, Monroe 

Kansas, Robert Loggan, Clifton. 

Degree Workers. — [Seceders.] 
J. K. Glassford, Carthage, Mo. 

D. P. Rathbun, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Other Lecturers. 

C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 
N. Callander, Thompson, Pa. 
J H. TImmons, Tarentum, Pa 
J. H. Baird, Templeton, Pa. 
T. B. McCormlck, Princeton, Ind. 

E. Johnson, Dayton, Ind. 

H. A. Day, Williamstown, Mich. 

J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Pa. 

A. Mayn, Bloomington, Ind. 

J. B. Cressinger, Sullivan, O. 

W. M. Love, Osceola, Mo. 

A. D. Freeman, Dovraers Grove, 111 

E. Mathews, Spring Arbor, Mich. 

Wm. Fenton St Paul, Minn. 

E. I. Grinnell, Blairsburg, Iowa. 

Warren Taylor, South Salem, O. 

J. S. Perrv, Thompson, Conn. 

C. F. Hawley, Wheaton, 111. 

J. T. Michael, New WUmington, Pa. 

8. C. Kimball, New Market, N. H. 

S. G. Barton, Breckinridge, Mo. 

Joel H. Austin, Goshen, Ind. 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

E. Barnetson, Jackson Valley, Pa. 

Wm. R. Roach, Pickering, Ont. 

D 4. Rf'-harde, Brighton, Mich. 

R. J, Williams, Winnebago City, Minn. 



A Wonderful Woman, 

A Wonderful Life, 

AND 

A Wonderful Book, 

Laura S. Haviland is a quiet, gentle, 
unassuming Quaker woman, 76 years of 
age, yet vigorous, wi'^o has had a remark- 
able career of usef unless, and has now 
given to the world a remarkable history 
of her "Life Work" as a teacher, at an 
early day, of the colored refugees in 
Canada and in Michigan, and in other 
States, as a traveler down South in the 
guise of a "berry picker," helping out 
into freedom many slaves; as a nurse and 
preacher to the sufferers in hospitals dur- 
ing the war; and with Gov. St. John and 
Flizabeth Comstock, relieving the desti- 
tute and suffering refugees in Kansas, 
etc. 

Her book is neither fiction nor found- 
ed on fiction, but is an interesting narra- 
tion of facts of a most thrilling charac- 
ter, as every one will find and testify who 
will get and read her book, now on sale 
at the Cynosure office, 221 W. Madison 
St., Chicago, 111. Price, cloth, $1,75; 
half Russia, $3.25. 

A WOMAN'S VICTORY; 

OB 

THE QUERY OF THE LODGEVILLE 
CHURCH 



BY JENNIE L. HARDIB, 

This simple and touching story which 
was lately published in the Cyno 
sure is now ready for orders in a beautiful 
pamphlet. It is worth reading by every 
Anti-mason —and especially by his wife. 
Gl-et it and take it home to cheer the heart 
of your companion who may desire to do 
something for Christ against great evils, 
but is discouraged from making any pub- 
lic effort. Price, fifteen cents. Ten 
for a doUar 



The American Party. 



First Nomination for President at Oberlin, 
Ohio, May 23, 187a. 

PnATroRM Adopted at Chicago, June 28, 
1872. 

Name Adopted at Syracuse, N. Y., June 3, 
1874. 

PRESIDENTAL CANDIDATES: 

1873— Charles Francis Adams and Joseph L. 
Barlow. 

1876— James B. Walker and Donald Kirkpat- 
rick. 

1880— J. W. Phelps and Samuel C. Pomeroy. 

1884— J. Blanchard and J. W. Conant nomi- 
nated; the former withdrawing, Samuel C. 
Pomeroy was nominated. Both nominees with- 
drawing, the support of the party was generally 
given to John P. St. John and William Daniel, 
candidates of the Prohibition party. 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

F. W. Capwell, New York ; /. A. Gonmtt, Con- 
necticut; E. O. Paitie, Minnesota; O. W. Nee- 
dels, Missouri; E. D. Bailey, District of Colum- 
bia (Ex. Com ) James Kennedy, California; 
Robert Hardie, Dakota; J. F. Galloway, Flori- 
da; L. N. StrattoD, Illinois; Israel Hess, Indi- 
ana; .1. N. Norris Iowa; H. Curtis, Kansas, S. 
A. Pratt, Massachusetts ; H. A. Day, Michigan ; 
E. Tapley, Mississippi; S. C. Kimball, New 
Hampshire; Robert Armstrong, New Jersey; 
E. A. Foldstrom, Nebraska; J. M. Scott, Ohio; 
Wm. H. Pruett, Oregon; A. M, PauU, Rhode 
Island; J. W. Moss, West Virginia; M. R. Brit- 
ten, Wisconsin. 

AMERICAN PLATFORM. 



ADOPTED AT CHICAGO, JUNE 20, 1884. 

Viewing with deep concern the corrupt and 
unsettled condition of American politics, and 
witnessing with alarm the fearful prevalence of 
caste and clannishuess by which our citizens 
are being arrayed in hostile bands, working se- 
cretly to compass political ends, a method di- 
rectly and powerfully tending to increase cor- 
ruption, to destroy mutual confidence, and 
hasten disruption and bloodshed ; and having 
no hope of adequate remedy for these evils 
from existing parties, and believing the foun- 
dation of a party based upon the fundamental 
principles of the Declaration of American In- 
dependence, both inevitable and indispensable : 

We, therefore, a portion of the American 
people, believing with our fathers that we have 
our rights and liberties, not from men or par- 
ties, but from God ; believing in the Christian 
marriage, and not in Mormonism; believing in 
the religious democracy of the New Testament, 
and not in the despotism of the lodge ; believ- 
ing, also, with our Scotch and English ancest- 
ors, that civil government, though ordained in 
God, is "founded in nature, not in grace," and, 
therefore, that all have equal civil rights ; while 
we abhor the idea of enforcing religion or con- 
trolling conscience by human laws and penal- 
ties as calculated to make hypocrites, not 
Christians, and savoring of the days of priest- 
ism, the fagot and the stake, we at the same 
time as firmly believe that atheism and priest> 
craft are twins and both alike foes to human 
liberty and welfare. We further most firmly 
believe that a government without God has 
none but lynch power, and is destitute of all 
legitimate authority to maintain civil order, to 
swear a witness, to try a criminal, to hang a 
murderer, to imprison a thief ; and while we 
consider government without God as a mere 
usurpation, we regard all religions and wor- 
ships Invented by men, and so having no high- 
er than human origin, as mere swindling impo- 
sitions and cheats. We believe in peace and in 
national arbitration as a means of perpetuating 
it; yet we as profoundly believe that the 
bravery and blood of our soldiers have bought 
us the peace which we enjoy, and we honor 
the memories of the dead and will be just to 
the claims of the living ; and we take up and 
prolong the strain raised by the women of this 
country: "For God, and home, and native 
land," and trust that this beautiful and patri- 
otic motto will soon be not only echoed by their 
voices, but sustained by their votes. 

We, therefore, solemnly adopt and present 
the following, as containing a brief synopsis of 
the principles of our government, by which we 
intend to be governed in casting our votes. We 
hold: 

I. That ours is a Christian and not a heathen 
nation, and that the God of the Christian Scrip- 
tures is the author of civil government. 

a. That the Bible should be associated with 
books of science and literature in all our edu- 
cational institutions. 

3. That God requires, and man needs a Sab- 
bath. 

4. We demand the prohibition of the impor- 
tation, manufacture, and sale of intoxicating 
drinks. 

5. We hold that the charters of all secret 
lodges granted by our Federal and State Legis- 
latures should be withdrawn, and their oaths 
prohibited by law. 

6. We are opposed to putting prison labor or 
depreciated contract labor from foreign coun- 
tries in competition with free labor to benefit 
manufacturers, corporations or speculators. 

7. We are in favor of a revision and enforce- 
ment of the laws concerning patents and inven- 
tions; for the prevention and punishment of 
frauds either upon Inventors or the general 
public. 

8. We hold to and will vote for woman suf- 
frage. 

9. That the civil equality secured to all 
American citizens by Articles 13, 14 and 15 of 
our amended National Constitution should be 
preserved inviolate, and the same equality 
should be extended to Indians and Chinamen. 

10. That international differences should be 
settled by arbitration. 

II. That land and other monopolies should 
be discouraged. 

12. That the general government should fur- 
nish the peopl* vlth kq uipl* «&d aouad €Wl- 



13. That It should he the settled policy of the 
government to reduce tariffs and taxes as rap- 
idly as the necessities of revenue and vested 
business interests will allow. 

14. That polygamy should he immediately 
suppressed by law, and that the Republican 
party is censurable for the long neglect of its 
duty in respect to this evil. 

15. And, finally, we demand for the Ameri- 
can peonle the abolition of electoral colleges, 
and a direct vote for President and Vice Presi 
dent of the United States. 



TB^E CHURCHES VS. LOD^^RY. 

The following denominations are com- 
mitted by vote of their legislative assem- 
blies or by constitution to a separation 
from secret lodge worship): 

Adventists (Seventh-day.) 

Baptists — Primitive, Seventh-day and 
Scandinavian. 

Brethren (Dunkers ov German Bap- 
tists.) 

Christian Reformed Church. 

Church of God "^Northern Indiana El 
dership.) 

Congregational — -The State Associations 
of Illinois and Iowa have adopted resolu- 
tions against the lodge. 

Disciples (in part.) 

Friends. 

Lutherans — Norwegian, Danish, Swed- 
ish and Synodical Conferences. 

Mennonites. 

Methodists — Free and Wesleyan. 

Methodist Protestant (Minnesota Con 
ference.) 

Moravians. 

Plymouth Brethren. 

Presbyterian — Associate, Reformed and 
United. 

Reformed Church (Holland Branch.) 

United Brethren in Christ. 

Individual churches in some of these 
denominations should be excepted, in part 
of them even a considerable portion. 

The following local churches have, as a 
pledge to disfellowship and ojipose lodge 
worship, given their names to the follow- 
ing list as 

THE associated CHURCHES OF CHKIST. 

New Ruhamah Cong. Hamilton, Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Cong. Sandford Co. Ala. 

New Hope Methodist, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Congregational, College Springs, Iowa. 

College Church of Christ, Wheaton, 111. 

First Congregational, Leland, Mich. 

Sugflr Grove Church, Green county. Pa. 

Military Chapel, M. £., Lowndes county, 
Miss. 

Hopewell Missionary Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Cedar Grove Miss. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Miss. 

Simon's Chapel, M. E., Lowndes Co., Miss. 

Pleasant Ridge Misa. Baptist, Lowndes Co., 
Vliss. 

Brownlee Church, Caledonia, Miss. 

Salem Church, Lowndes Co., Miss. 

West Preston Bantist Church, Wayne Co.,Pa. 

OTHER LOCAL CHURCHES 

adopting the same principle are — 

Baptist churches : N. Abington, Pa. ; Meno- 
monie, Mondovl, Waubeck and Spring Prairie, 
Wis.; Wheaton, lU. ; Perry, N. Y. ; Spring 
Creek, near Burlington, Iowa ; Lima, Ind. ; 
ConstableviUe, N. Y. The "Good WiU Assocl- 
ton" of Mobile, Ala., comprising some twenty- 
five colored Baptist churches; Bridgewater 
Baptist Association, Pa. ; Old Tebo Baptist, 
near LeesviUe, Henry Co., Mo. ; Hoopeston, 111; 
Esmen, lU. ; Strykersville, N. Y. 

Congregational churches : 1st of Oberlin, O. ; 
Tonica, Crystal Lake, Union and Big Woods, 
111. ; Solsbury, Ind. ; Congregational Methodist 
Maplewood, Mass. 

Independent churches In Lowell, Country- 
man school house near Llndenwood, M?rengo 
and Streator, 111. ; Berea and Camp Nelson, Ky ; 
Ustlck, 111. ; Clarksburg, Kansas ; State Associ- 
ation of Ministers and Churches of Christ in 
Kentuckv. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS 

Who depend on voluntary contributions 
of Christian people in whole or in part 
for their support: 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

Eli Tapley, Columbus, Miss. 

J. F. Galloway, Okahumka Florida. 

Wm. Hazenburg, Cape Town, 8. 
Africa. 

A. D. Zaraphonithes, Andros, Greece. 

C. B. Ward, Secunderabad, India. 

The Evangelists associated with Rev. 
John Q. Fee, of Berea, Ky. 

Contributions for either of these breth 
ren may be forwarded through the Treas- 
urer of the N. C. A. Please designate 
to which one such funds shall be sent. 



ordering; goods, or ; 
iuiries concerning articles advertised 
la this paper, will confer a favor by stat 
lag that they saw the advertisement ist 




N. C. A. BUILDING AND OFFICE OP 

THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSLTIE, 
221 WEST MADISON STREET, CHICAGO 



NATlONALCHBIbTIAN ASSOCIATION 

President.— F. W. Capwell, Dale, N.Y. 

Vice-president — Rev. W. T. Meloy, 
D.D., Chicago. 

Rec. Sec'y.— W. I. Phillips. 

Cor. Sec'y and Gbneal Agent. — J. 
P Stoddard, 221 W. Madison st., Chicago. 

Treasurer.— W. I. Phillips, 221 W. 
Madison Street, Chicago. 

Directors. — Alexander Thomson, M 
R. Britten, John Gardner, J. L. Barlow, 
Joseph Travis, William Moerdyk, 0. F. 
Lumry, M. C. Ranseen L. N. Stratton, 
Thos. H. Gault, C. A. Blanchard. 

The object of this Association is; 

"To expose, ivithstand and remove secret 
societies, Freemasonry in particular, and other 
anti-Christian movements, in order to save the 
churches of Christ from being depraved, to re- 
deem the administr? ion of justice from per- 
version, and our r'p blican government from 
corruption." 

To carry on this work contributions are 
solicited from every friend of tae reform. 

Form op Bequest.— I give and bequeath to 
the National Christian Association, incorpo- 
rated and existing under the laws of the State 

of Illinois, the sum of dollars for the 

purposes of said Association, and for which 
ffie receipt of its Treasurer for the time being 
^iJaU be sufficient discharge. 

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

President. — Rev. S. Collins, D. D 
Secretaries. — Rev. 8. A. George. H. 
L. Kellogg and M. N. Butler. 

state auxiliary associations 

Alabama.— Pres.jW. A, McAlpine; Sec, G 
M. Elliott; Treas., E. Fishel, all of Selma. 

California.— Pres., L. B. Lathrop, HoUls- 
ter; Cor. Sec, Mrs. U. P. Merrill, Woodland; 
Treas., C. Ruddock, Woodland. 

CoNNBCTiCTTT.— Pres., J. A. Conant, WilU- 
mantic; Sec, Geo. Smith, WUlimantie ; Treas., 
C. T. CoUins, Windsor. 

Iliinois.— Pres., Wm. H. Chandler, Dover; 
Sec, H. L. Kellogg; Treas., W. I. Phillips^ 
Cynosure office. 

Indiana. — Pres., William H. Figg, Reno- 
Sec, 8. L. Cook. Albion; Treas., Benj. Ulsh 
Silver Lake. 

lOWA.— Pres., Geo. Warrington, Birming- 
ham; Rec. Sec, A. W.Hall, College Springs; 
Cor. Sec, T. C. Maughlin, W'ashingtw; 
Treas., J. A. Laird, Wayne. 

Kansas.— Pres., J. P. Richards, Ft. Scott; 
Sec, W. W. McMiUen, Olathe; Treas., 8. 
Alexander, Linden. 

Massachus TTS.— Pres., S. A. Pratt; Sec, 
Mrs. E. D. Bailey ; Treas., David Manning, Sr. ; 
all of Worcester. 

Michigan.— Pres., D. A. Richards, Brighton ; 
Sec'y, H. A. Day, WUliamstown ; Treas., 
Geo. Swanson, Jr., Jackson. 

Minnesota.— Pres., E. G. Paine, V"/asloja 
Cor. Sec, W. H. McChesney, Fairmont; Rec. 
Sec'y, Thos. Hartley, Richland ; Treas., Wm. 
H. MorriU, St. Charles. 

Missouri.— Pres., C. J. Kephart, Avalon 
Treas.. William Beauchamp, Avalon; Cor. Sec. 
M. N. Butler 

Nebraska.— Pres., S. Austin, Fairmount, 
Cor. Sec, W. S. Spooner, Kearney; Treas 
J. C. Fyc 

New Hampshire.— Pres., A. H. Lamprey, 
Laconia; Sec, S. C. Kimball, New Market; 
Treas., '• eorge Crosby, Gilford Village. 

New York.— Pres., F. W. Capwell, Dale; 
Sec'y, John Wallace, Syracuse; Treas., M. 
Merrick, Syracuse. 

Ohio.— Pres., Vm. DlUon, Dayton; Cor 
Sec, J. P. Lyt..,, Sago; Treas., J. M. Scott, 
Alexandria. 

Pennsylvania. — Pres., A. L. Post, Mon- 
trose; Cor. i=ec, N. Callender, Thompson; 
Treas., W. B. BertelSLWilkesbarre. 

Vermont.— Pres., W. R. Laird; Sec, C. W. 
Potter. 

Wisconsin.— Pres., J. W. Wood. Baraboo; 
Sec, W. W. Ames, Menomonie: Treas., M. R 
Britten, Vienna. 

Wbst Virginia.— Pres., D.B. Tnmey ; Sec, 
John Bosley, Graftno. Tree., H B Biggins, 
Fetroleom. 



I 



"^ 



THE CHRISTIAN CYl^OStTRE. 



October 15, 1886 



The Christian Cynosure. 

Editobs. 
J. BLANCHAKD. HENRY L. KELLOGG 

CHICAGO, THTJKSDAY, OCTOUEK 15, 1885. 



Reap with cake nvo articles in this uumbcr, "^1 
Poicerf'ul Appeal for the /South" and -A J^ha for 
Union.'' They aiv both excellent and from Missis- 
sippians by nativit}" or choice. The senior editor of 
the Cynosure has in contemplation making a tour 
through the South this autumn or winter, to see 
•what can l>e done, and to speak where gooil audi- 
ences can be had, prior to the proposed General 
Evangelical convention. Will Bro. Woodsmall of 
luka, Mississippi, and others, write to the Cynosure 
whether meetings can be had with them, or in Mem- 
phis and New Orleans? 



Pres. C. a. Bi.AXcnARP of Wheaton College has 
read Mrs. Haviland's -Life Work,'" and thinks it 
makes a stronger impression against slavery than 
did "T'ncle Toms Cabin." 



TuE KETTLE si.VGs BEFORE IT BOILS, and the Coun- 
try now on the subject of secret societies is in the 
condition of that kettle. Old conservative papers, 
like the ^'e^mont Chronicle, are now attacking the 
swarms of secret orders because they are disintegrat- 
ing the churches by drawing the men and mone}' out 
of them, and leaving the women to do the paying 
and praying. 



Thz Con-jiP-cs Index (Miss.) gives the case of a 
colored preacher, H. H. Milburn, sentenced six years 
to the i)enitentiary for embezzling S400, money be- 
longing to a secret society called --The Seven Stars," 
and made up of both sexes, of which Milburn was 
treasurer. The South everywhere swarms with such 
societies, constructed on the principle of villain}' 
and scouudrelism. The American Misionarj- Asso- 
ciation is short this year. Between two and three 
thousand Congregational churches have contributed 
nothing to its treasury. Xearly ever}- Christian de- 
nomination has missions for the ex-slaves; yet how 
few of those colored churches exclude members of 
secret societiesi But until they do so their work is 
a failure. The secret societies suck out all vitality 
and spirituality from them. Such churches are not 
worth supporting, and the wonder is that sensible 
people give them support. 



TiiK Arkansas Baptist, (Little Bock) Oct. 1, 
asks why colored people have a school house costing 
but s=2..500, while the whites have one costing .$15,- 
UOO. and answers. -Because white people put their 
money into school houses, and colored people put 
theirs into societies." The Baptist is a bright, 
well-edited paper, taking enlarged and just views of 
things. It extracts -from the Century a Southern 
woman's letter urging Southern ladies to teach col- 
ored schools, and rebukes the ostracism with which 
Northern women have been visited for teaching such 
schools. This is good sense as well as good reli- 
gion. 



EON. EIGHARB RUSE. 



It is siMi'LY amazing that intelligent, educated 
men should ooniplain of preaching the terrors of 
God's law as harsh. There is more terror in the 
words of Christ than ever human lips uttered. In- 
stance. "In hell he lifted up his eyes, being in tor- 
ment;" and. "For I am tormented in this flame!" 



Small-I'OX mobs in Montreal to resist vaccination 
by French Catholics, one would think, must open 
the eyes of men to the uselessness of priests and 
their teaching. Ever since Quebec was founded in 
1608, one year after Jamestown, Xa.., and twelve 
years before Puritans founded New England, the 
Canadian French have been as clay in the hands of 
priests; and they are now, after 277 years' tuition, 
fighting a remedy tried and accepted by the civil- 
ized world. Christ "hath an unchanging priest- 
hootl." All true human priests pointed to and end- 
ed in him. Heb. 7: 24. So that all priests, since 
Christ, are usurpers and counterfeits, and the lodge 
reveals their true nature. They are antagonists and 
rivals of Christ. 



If the General Convention of Anti-secret 
Chckches, which thus far meets with much favor, 
promises to be a truly national gathering, the mis- 
sionary societies will wish to be represented, and 
some one will make a tour through the South and 
secure a full representation of the colored people. 



Take him for all in all, 

We shall not look upon his like again. 

— Sli ake^spvare. 

An old paper has been handed us, the Hartford, 
Conn., Intelligencer of 1S29. Daniel Webster, J. Q. 
Adams, Edward Everett, Seward, Stevens, and their 
peers were then Anti-masons, in print. So were the 
entire Andover faculty, and some thousands of or- 
thodox clergymen with them. Yet this Hartford 
paper tells us that there was not a town in the State, 
where the Intelligencer was taken, "in which Masous 
had not endeavored to prevent its circulation." 
Posl-riders refused to carry it to subscribers. A 
lodge-committee attempted to bribe a carrier not to 
take it. "A Masonic clergyman, on the Sabbath, 
just out of the desk, snatched the paper in the house 
of a subscriber and committed it to the fire. Post- 
masters, writing the editor on business, did not frank 
their letters. A multitude of abusive and insulting 
letters, were written to the editor, the postage not paid 
by the writers. Masonic postmasters retained the 
paper in their offices and wrote the editor that "it 
lay there dead," and charged him the postage, while 
refusing or neglecting to give the paper to subscrib- 
ers. Burning the paper by Masons was a common 
occurrence; and one post-rider was stopped by Ma- 
sonic ruffians and threatened with violence if he 
brought the paper there again. General Jackson, 
then President, with his Cabinet, Livingston, Barry, 
Eaton, Poinsett, etc., were members of Federal lodge 
No. 1, in the District of Columbia, and Livingston 
was "Grand High Priest." 

During that time, while the lodge was red with 
murder, and rank with every act which defines a 
villain, presses claiming decency and respectability 
spoke of the opponents of the lodge as "fanatics," 
"persecutors," "officeseekers," and "madmen." And 
though by a confession of judgment, 1,500 lodges 
gave up their charters under charges of murder, 
perjury, blasphemy, and treason against God and 
government, the scattered lodgeites bated no jot of 
their impudent haughtiness and supercilious con- 
tempt for great and good men. The same spirit is in 
them still. 

Philip C. Tucker, of Vergennes, Vt., was for a 
time almost the sole public adherent of the lodge in 
that vicinity. He was a small, red-faced, bloated 
lawyer. After discharging a volley of his rattling 
ribaldry in the Middlebury court-house, the Vermont 
jurist and Senator, Phelps, whose son now represents 
us at the English court, referred to Tucker thus: 

"Your honor, I have no word of reply, toMr.Tucker. 
He has given us neither law nor argument. He has 
come into court, and, like a bear.setting on his haunch- 
es, he has simply growled at the case which he neither 
understands nor explains." Yet this inferior,seventh- 
rate person is a high saint in Masonic books. 

The Cytiosure presents its readers with the picture 
of Hon. Richard Rush, 

A representative anti-mason 

of that day. A sketch of his father, Benjamin 
R-ush, has already been given to our readers, and his 
Centennial celebrated as the father and founder of 
the temperance cause. His two sons, Benjamin and 
Richard, have left names which will last while there 
is a Rush Medical College, or an American diploma- 
cy. Of these two sons, Richard was by much the 
greatest man. Born in Philadelphia, Aug. 29th, 
1780, he died there July 30th, 1859. 

Few lives have been richer or more diversified. 
As our minister to England, he negotiated treaties 
which prevented war. While Attorney General, he 
compiled our national laws. In 1833 he published 
a volume entitled "Memoranda of a Residence at the 
Court of St. James;" and in 18-15 added a second 
volume of "Memoranda, Official and Personal." In 
1857, he published "Washington's Domestic Life;" 
and in 1860 there appeared a volume of Miscella- 
nies. In 1828 he received 83 electoral votes for 
Vice President of the United States, on the ticket 
with J. (.1 Adams. Appointed minister to France, 
he was first to acknowledge the French Republic of 
1848. Eight years before (1840), the United States 
Democratic Review speaks thus of Mr. Rush; "If 
talent of the highest order, an education the most 
liberal, laborious study, a judgment matured by 
profound thought; if a long life of devotion to his 
country in connection with some of her most unfor- 
tunate civic services; if political wisdom drawn from 
the best and purest sources, and a ]jolitical integrity 
never questioned; if the most marked evidence by 
his fellow-countrymen of their just appreciation of 
his merits, — if such grounds can create an undenia- 
ble title to a national name, it will be awarded to 
Mr, Rush." And if blood enobles, he was the son 
of one signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
and the grandson of another. 



His first political speech on the attack of the Brit- 
ish on our frigate Chesapeake (1807) ranked him 
high among American orators. Next year he de- 
fended Col. Duane against Gov. McKean, which 
greatly endeared him to the then Democratic party. 
In January, 1811, Gov. Snyder appointed him At- 
torney General of Pennsylvania, and in November 
of the same year. President Madison appointed him 
Comptroller of the Treasurj-. In June, 1812, war 
was declared with England, and on July 4th follow- 
ing, Mr. Rush was selected to deliver an oration, 
when the President, Cabinet, both houses of Con- 
gress, and all the French ministers were among his 
audience. February, 1814, he had his choice of 
two seats iu the Cabinet. He chose that of Attor- 
ney General, and filled the post with great public 
approbation. In 1817 he was Secretary of State, 
pro tern, six months under Monroe. During this 
time he arranged with Great Britain to cut down the 
national forces on the lakes to one vessel for each 
nation. October 31st, 1817, Mr. Rush was appoint- 
ed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotenti- 
ary to Great Britain, a post which he held seven 
years. Many difficult matters were settled by him. 
His reports fill six or eight folios, and may now be 
seen in the State Department. 

Gen. Jackson executed Arbuthnot and Ambrister, 
two British subjects, and war was averted only by 
the patriotism and address of Adams and Rush: 
and the celebrated "Monroe Doctrine," which has 
been the settled policy of the country ever since, 
was formulated and established by these two states- 
men. After this Mr. Rush rendered important serv- 
ice in settling a dangerous and stormy dispute be- 
tween Ohio and Michigan; and also in securing the 
legacy which founded the Smithsonian Institution in 
Washington. 

Now unlock the lodges. March out the taterde- 
malian host of stripped and sworn and aproned 
dupes. Let the whole host of darkness confront 
this one American, whose magnificent record is par- 
tially given above! Let them all shout at once 
"Crank," ^^Fanatic!" and see how the army of frogs, 
swallowing grandiloquent titles to swell themselves 
to the size of men, see how they shrink and pale 
away before the indignant glance of this one honest 
man. See how their "Sovereign, Grand Commander 
Pike," followed by his Indian regiments in gray, with 
the scalps of Union soldiers dangling at their necks, 
quails before the indignant loathing of an honest 
American patriot and then let the world of lookers- 
on say which is the crank! 

We have presented Richard Rush as a man and a 
statesman. We shall now present him as an Anti- 
mason. 

In 1831 Anti-masons held in Baltimore the first 
national nominating convention for President of the 
United States. His friends applied to Mr. Rush to 
be their candidate. He declined. He had written 
and published powerful letters against the lodge; 
and he would not weaken the great force of his let- 
ters by running for office on an Anti-masonic ticket. 
Mr. Wirt was nominated. 

Mr. Rush gave the great force of his mind to the 
study of the lodge question as developed in the 
courts; in testimony before committees of legisla- 
tures; and in revelations by hundreds of seceders 
from the lodges, many of them the best men living, 
and their testimony all agreed; and Mr. Rush poured 
out the wealth of his mighty genius, as a lawyer, 
statesman, and diplomatist. It was the story of 
Hercules strangling the serpent turned to history. 
He wrote simply as a man and an American, against 
the lodge which "is," in the words of Seward, "hos- 
tile to every American principle." 

His first letter was a reply to a committee of the 
people of his own county, asking his views of the 
lodge. It is dated May 4th, 1831. He objects to 
"secret societies": 

1. "Because pursuing objects unknown to the 
public, through means not known to the public, they 
act under diminished responsil)ilities to the public 
* * * Freemasonry is such a society." 

2. Again: "It is seen from these [Lockport] trials 
that the laws cannot be executed upon the authors 
of an audacious and bloody conspiracy, in one of 
the most populous parts of the Union * * * although 
the conspirators are known to more than one hun- 
dred persons belonging to the Masonic body." 

3. Again: "The law is paralyzed by a hidden 
agent stronger than the combined force of its ma- 
chinery and its ministers." "I challenge the Span- 
ish Inquisition to exceed it." 

4. Again: "The press on this occasion has fallen 
into stupidity or turpitude. * * No sophistry can 
gainsay this position. * * True, these are depraved 
Masons who have done the deed, and I do not mean 
to judge all other Masons by them; but Masonry, 
corporate, existent Masonry, is the root. The aban- 

■ doned fiends of the order know the truth and con- 



October 15, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE3. 



ceal it on system. They are wicked through princi- 
ple. They confound crime with virtue; murder, with 
Masonic merit. Lilie imps of Pandemonium, they 
rejoice and dance in their sin. The deeper their 
guilt the more they make themselves invulnerable." 

5. Again: "The press is silent or scoffs! The in- 
stitution even turns complainant. It positively 
grows belligerant. It will not be 'persecuted.' It 
will have no noise made, none of this Hash and blus- 
ter. Those who are driving the conspirators into 
the toils and breaking up their dens to save the fu- 
ture from similar tragedies, are denounced, ridi- 
culed! They are infected with Anti-masonic excite- 
ment," etc., etc. 

Such is the tenor of the first of the series of let- 
ters by this great and noble American. Contrasted 
with the subtle, crawling outgivings of the lodge, 
they read like the sentence of a judge against con- 
victed felons. And they are not obsolete. Their 
doctrine is as true and necessary to-day as the mo- 
ment when uttered. 

The time of our readers, and our own, forbids in 
one article an analysis of the other five letters on 
Masonry. They should all be read and pondered by 
every young American. They were written: the 
' first as above; (li), to the officers of a Massachusetts 
convention; (3), to citizens of Lancaster county, Pa.; 
(4), to Hon. John C. Spencer; (5), to a State commit- 
tee of a convention at Harrisburg; and (6), to a Sen- 
atorial convention in Pennsylvania. 

In all these letters Mr. Rush deals with the lodge 
on political, not on religious grounds. He quotes 
Dymond "On the Principles of Morality" who saj^s: 
'■'■There are some creditable editors tvho do harm in the 
world, to an extent, compared with which jobbery and 
treason are as nothing;" and shows that their guilt is 
the crime of not doing; suppressing truth by silence. 
(See the religious press of to-day.) He spurns as in- 
sult the cry of Masons, ^^ Punish the guilty but not the 
innocent;" when every adhering Mason upholds the 
lodge which screens "<Ae guilty." He declares that the 
men convicted and then in jail for taking Morgan 
off were then in good standing in all the lodges; no 
one of them ever was turned out of any lodge; but. 
Masons fed and feted them, and carpeted their jails. 
Yet the editorial eunuchs of the lodge cry, ^'■Punish 
the guilty" whom the lodges conceal, while they up- 
hold the lodges which conceal murder, and so are 
themselves guilty. "Nobody dreams of indicting 
innocent Masons for the murder of Morgan; but 
only of putting an end to the institution which made 
Masons murder him." "The very dog unchained" 
fixes liability on the owner for the injury he does in 
the streets. He insists that "Prohibitory statutes" 
should be enacted against the lodge in New York. 
He calls the editors who act as janizaries and 
eunuchs for the lodge, "Cautious sentinels, prompt 
and valiant to fire on the foes of the lodge; but 
never too quick to hit the lodge." "When Masonry 
calls the name of Washington to its aid, it commits 
a profanation rivaling its crime of murder." "As 
surely as he tore in pieces the oath which once 
bound him to George III., so surely would he have 
torn up the oath which bound him to a lodge con- 
victed of crime against the laws;" and, "There is, ob- 
viously, no mode of getting rid of it but by bringing 
public opinion to bear on it at our elections." A sin- 
gle Mason on a jury defeated an action brought by 
the people of New York. Masons have refused to 
testify in courts, preferring a jail to testifying to the 
truth against the lodge. 

But enough, at least for this time. Our object 
has been to show which is the "crank," Hon. Pilch- 
ard Rush, or Confederate General Pike. To show 
that the lodge is a compound of mean and man-de- 
grading vices; in all ages, one and the same; its 
morals, villainy; its religion, blasphemy; and its 
god, Satan, the "god of this world who deceiveth 
the kings of the earth and the whole world." That 
good men are deceived by it is no more justification 
of it than that good men are bitten by mad dogs 
justifies hydrophobia. It is of Satan's planting, and 
Christ's word is given that it "shall be rooted up." 
And if a general convention of anti-secret churches 
can unite good men against it, that will be one of 
the brightest days that ever dawned on the hopes of 
America and the world since the advent of Christ. 



■ — Secretary Stoddard returned Saturday from a 
very profitable and encouraging trip of two weeks 
which has been reported. He expects this week to 
speak in Pecatonica and Rockford. 

— Bro. C. F. Hawley, Iowa agent, is preparing for 
a county meeting at West Union, Fayette county, 
October 19Lh, and writes to engage the services of 
Secretary Stoddard for that date. 

— The Iconoclast of Brantford, Ontario, whose edi- 
tor, Rev. T. P. Wilkinson, has dealt the lodge some 
heavy blows, has removed to Toronto and takes a 



new name — The Golden Rule. The editor's address 
isParkdale, Ont. 

— A few days ago an aged widow in Ohio sent *5, 
to help .on the blessed and urgent work for which 
Bro. Woodsmall pleads on the second page of this 
number. How many of our wealthy friends can 
add as much or more to this fund for sending the 
paper to Southern ministers? 

— Our untiring friend, George W. Clark, who will 
never allow us to call him "old," is still the bard of 
the reform. He has nearly ready for sale by the N. 
C. A. a choice selection of his reform songs, suited 
especially to our work, which will be supplied at so 
popular a rate that we hope every family will need 
two or three copies. 

—Elder Callender's appeal for the Memphis brethren 
will not, we are sure, be unheeded. Read it and lay 
it before the Lord. A sister also, who wishes to aid 
Bro. Zaraphonithes in Greece in the same way — se- 
curing a home, — starts a subscripiion of $1.00. 
Will not other friends add to this sum? Send for 
both objects, with plain designation, to Bro. Phillips, 
Treasurer N. C. A. 

— Bro. R. Loggan of the Kansas Association is 
attending the annual United Brethren conference at 
Clifton. Next week he hopes to begin a solid win- 
ter's work for the reform, traveling with his own 
conveyance much of the time and taking in the coun- 
try settlements. Let the Kansas friends welcome 
Bro. Loggan wherever he appears, and send for him 
when he delays long a visit. 

— Rev. George Warrington, president of the Iowa 
State Association, is the American candidate for 
County Superintendent of Schools for Van Buren 
county. The party has a full county ticket headed 
by S. Boon for representative to the State Legisla- 
ture. The partisan press is greatly exercised at the 
union of Anti-masons and Prohibitionists in sup- 
porting the State ticket. The conditions are favor- 
able for a good vote for the Mickelwaite ticket. 

— Bro. W. B. Stoddard goes to his new field in 
Ohio on Thursday of this week. His canvass of 
Chicago has enriched his experience and quickened 
his zeal against the lodge. Ohio friends must put 
their shoulders to the wheel with him. He does not 
propose to aim at nothing and hit It. Read his ad- 
dress in another column, and let there be no waver- 
ing in the lines. Our Great Master expects every 
man to do his duty when the battle Is set in array. 
There must be some self-denial in order to accom- 
plish anything in an unpopular reform. Such work 
only proves our faith. 

— The article in this number explaining the for- 
mation and character of a new temperance society 
among Scandinavians is by the editor of Tidens Fra- 
gor, (Questions of the Times). The principle of se- 
crecy which curses other movements in this direc- 
tion is very sensibly rejected, but will not the de- 
grees, titles and formality open the way for the lodge 
with its obligations? This society was formed evi- 
dently with a sincere purpose to promote temper- 
ance. This should be encouraged and if there has 
been some mistake in the methods employed let it 
be kindly shown. Will not some one of our Swed- 
isii brethren undertake this labor in Christ's name? 



— The report of the Trustees of the Peabody ed- 
ucational fund, Oct. 7th, shows that rapid advance- 
ment has been made during the past year in educa- 
tional methods in the Southern States. Public sen- 
timent had revolutionized the public school system. 
The freedmen are now enjoying many school privi- 
leges hitherto denied them. The following sums 
from the Peabody educational fund have been paid 
out during the past year in the Southern States: Al- 
abama, $5,300; Arkansas, $3,100; Florida, $2,375; 
Georgia, $4,175; Louisiana, $1,800; Mississippi, 
$2,250; North Carolina, $5,430; South Carolina, 
$5,000; Tennessee, $11,850; Texas, $7,150; Virgin- 
ia, $6,775; West Virginia, $2,500. Total, $57,705. 

The same number of the Boston Evening Record 
which reported the arrest, trial, and condemntaion 
of seven persons who were fined ten dollars each for 
preaching the Gospel on Boston Common, contained 
on another page a map of the very precinct where 
the preaching occurred, showing the precise location 
of about a dozen gambling dens, which were being 
run contrary to law, week days, and probably Sun- 
days; none of which were interfered with by the 
police. Not that the police were partial to gambling 
or opposed to preaching, but they were obliged to 
obey orders, and they were ordered to make com- 
plaints against the preachers, and were not ordered 
to meddle with the other violaters of the law. Be- 
sides, it is useless to arrest criminals when the 
authorities will not prosecute them if complained 
of. — Common People. 



AN APPEAL FOR REV. R. N. COVNTEE. 

Memphis, Tenn., Sept. 17, 1885. 
Elder N. Callender, 

Dear Bro: — Having learned of you through El- 
der J. H. Austin, of Goshen, and of your great suf- 
fering for the cause of Christ, I write you, believing 
you would sympathize with me in this my day of 
trial. You have no doubt learned of my suffering 
(an account of which was published in nearly all the 
papers, but fully in the (Jhristian Cynosure of Chica- 
go), because of my oppositon to secretism. I have 
been a member and an active worker in the Mason- 
ics, Odd-fellows, Pythians, and other kindred orders 
nearly one-half of my life, and now because God 
has inspired my heart to oppose their wickedness 
and denounce them, I have been assailed, my house 
mobbed and fired into at the dead hour of night by 
a band of disguised secretists; who, conscious of 
the presence of my wife and children, and regard- 
less of their screams and that of my aged mother, 
inhumanly fired shot after shot into the house. 
But blessed be God, we all escaped. But you know 
how they are; they are j'et breathing out vengeance 
against me. I live one mile from the city proper, 
and have no protection save my brethren who come 
out every night and staj^ with us, walking as senti- 
nels all night long. Winter will soon be upon us, 
and they will not be able to walk so far and attend 
to their daily work, hence they are anxious to get 
me near them and make the enclosed appeal, kind- 
ly furnished us by Bro. Austin. If you will please 
lay this before your church, or before such person 
or persons as you think can or will help us, we will 
be very grateful to you, and anything you may suc- 
seed in obtaining for us will be prayerfully ack- 
nowledged. May God sustain jow, my brother, as 
you in like manner go forward to assist in hurling 
from his seat this power of Belial, and establishing 
by God's grace the name and power of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. Your brother in Christ, 

R. N. COUNTEE. 

Thompson, Pa., Oct. 7, 1885. 

Dear Cynosdre: — Few events of greater moment, 
if any, have occurred since our "holy war" upon the 
"image of the beast" commenced, some eighteen 
years ago, than the brave and noble stand taken by 
Bro. Countee of Memphis, Tenn. That his posi- 
tion against the secret empire is of vast importance, 
the enemy well understands. That the "old red 
dragon" is touched in a vital part is demonstrated 
bv his agonized writhings. When one who has been 
foremost and prominent in so many lodges, one who 
has devoted "half his life" to those slavish clans, 
and has been a proficient in them, boldl}' cuts loose 
from them, and, as all honest men will do, warns 
God's people and the world at large against them, 
we may expect "the heathen to rage and the people 
to imagine vain things;" 

Brother Countee has set a good example for the 
thousands of our ministers, both colored and white, 
who have been unwisely drawn into the slimy folds 
of that old serpent, the father of lodgery. Happy 
the man, though it cost him his all, with life itself, 
who breaks fellowship with demons. 

Do we, does any one, need further proof of the 
murderous spirit of the lodge? That Bro. Countee 
may be counted with the tens of thousands who 
have been "counted worthy" to die a martyr for 
Christ and truth, is quite possible even though we 
do all in our power to protect him. But however 
this may be, let the loyal hosts of God's people rally 
to his defence. It is a rare opportunity God has put 
before us to help shield such a spirit from the ven- 
geance of a sworn foe. Let God's dear people all 
over the land, of all classes, seize the opportunity 
and place the hero of Memphis in the safest spot 
in the city; where, shielded and encouraged by gush- 
ing sjanpathy and strong arms, he will feel as secure 
as a man of moral convictions and positive charac- 
ter can be made to feel, in a Christ-hating world like 
this. Our brother needs more than sympathj- unal- 
loyed. Let our sympathy be well mixed with the 
material aid that will culminate in a home in the 
midst of his brave people. Suiting our course to 
this sentiment we will see what may be done. 

We have not forgotten the days when it cost to be 
a sterling Mason, i. e.. Anti-mason. Speculative An- 
ti-masons we have, but they are too much like specu- 
lative Masons — shams. Let us have more operative 
Anti-masons. Apprehensive as we were of personal 
violence, (and not without reason) no "3Iasonic ven- 
geance" was actually executed on me, save only to at- 
tempt the execution of my reputation on the altar 
of public sentiment by the Masonic "setting maul" 
of falsehood and slander. This for a time robbed 
me of a comfortable support and the good will of 
the superficial. Truly yours, 

Nathan Callender. 



SS3B 



■.W9*k 



^^utm^m 



iff'Tiig'^iT'^ 'a.- ---s^ 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October 15, 1885 



The Home. 



TSB FULZyESS OF CHRIST. 



For Christ and his abasement 

And varied pains, I see 
Enough for me while living, 

At death, enough for me ; 
For through his cross I triumph, 

1 glorv in his shame. 
And find surpassing riches 

In his beloved name. 

Those held in sin's dark l>oudage 

He came to set at large. 
And with his blood he purchased 

Their just and free discharge: 
There is no condemnation 

To all the blood-freed throng; 
The blood's redeeming virtue 

Will be their endless song. 

He pardons sins, though counting 

Like drops of morning dew ; 
His love no mind can measure — 

Its life is ever new. 
He craves for room to pity, 

And mercy to impart — 
For boundless stores of mercy 

Are treasured in his heart. 

In praises after praises 

Eternity I'll spend, 
If I. a fainting pilerim, 

Shall see my journey's end ; 
All storms gone by forever. 

My sins all washed away. 
Of spotle.is white my garments. 

My light the perfect day. 

— from the Wehh. 



SABBATH BREAKI2fO IN GOD'S HOUSE. 



That Christianity is a divinely inspired system of 
faith and a rule of daily life, all orthodox people 
admit: but do we make enough of it on the side of 
devotion? Amid all the excellent admonitions to 
■work, are we not in danger of belittling the dut}- of 
worship? The Sabbath was appointed not merely 
for physical rest and refreshment, but for the wor- 
ship of God; sanctuaries are built not only as places 
of religious instructions, but for services of horn 
age and praise to Jehovah of Hosts. The primary 
puriwse of the Lords Day is to lead men to the 
Lord. 

(1) Suppose that we could ascertain the real mo- 
tives which bring many people to church on the Sab- 
bath. We would discover that some come to church 
with no thought of meeting God, but only of meet- 
ing their minister or some attractive preacher. The 
up[>ermost thought in their minds is not "is God 
in this place?' but who will be in the puipit to-day? 

They huve come to hear Mr. A or Dr. B , 

to enjoy his sermon, and perhaps they have an hon- 
est desire to be profited by his instructions. But 
their thoughts do not rise one inch above the pul- 
pit The preliminary service of prayer and praise 
and reading of Gods word is merely a "first course," 
an apj>etiser for the substantial feast of the sermon. 
It would not be regarded as a serious loss if all acts 
and utterances of pure devotion were dispensed with, 
and if the discourse occupied the whole time, as the 
lecture does in a popular lyceum hall. Far be it 
from u.s to disparage the province or the power of a 
faithful pulpit in unfolding God's word, and in the 
whole range of its work in awakening, guiding, com- 
forting, and edifying the immortal souls assembled 
before it. But no possible profit from the best of 
preachers, even though he combined the powers of 
a Chalmers and a Spurgeon, can make up for the ab- 
sence of deep and devout heart worship. An elo- 
quent tongue may thrill an auditor with sublime 
thoughts abfjut God, and yet that auditor have not 
one outgoing of heart tfjwards God. If there be 
any worship at all, it is the intellectual homage \x) 
the minister, and not a particle of worship of^him 
who is a Spirit, and in spirit and in truth. Some of 
the most enthusiastic admirers of good preaching 
are men and women who seldom think again about 
religion until the next -'splendid sermon" comes. 
We are afraid that thousands of church members 
would seldom enter the sanctuary if there were to 
be either verv inferior preaching or no preachincr at 
alL 

(2j If this first class are drawn to church for the 
intellectual or moral profit of the sermon, there is 
ano'her class who go for mere entertainment. "How 
did you like it?" is the first question which one of 
this self-indulgent class might ask of another. They 
enjoy the musical performances, provided that they 
are artistic and stimulating: but thej- would enjoy 
Parepa or Patti or some "prima donna" vastly 
more. Thev enjoy the sermon also if it is piquant 
and smart or gracefully deli\ ered. A leisure hour 



of a long day is pleasantly whiled away in good 
company, and a certain credit of respectability has 
been gotten very cheaply. When the performance 
is over, such persons can tell you how the organ vol- 
untary could be improved, or the soprano's execu- 1 
tiou, or the minister's gestures, or the dress of the 
next neighbors: but what improvement has been . 
made in their own hearts or in their character before , 
an all-searching God? Has God indeed been in their ^ 
thoughts for a single moment? They have been so , 
occupied in self-worship (for that is the real motive j 
which brings them there at all) that they have utter- 
ly ignored him whom the heaven of heavens de- 
lights to adore. 

(o) Here are two classes of sinners against the 
primal idea of worship. There is a third class 
whose sin is that the}- bring their farms and their 
flour mills, their stock-lists and tneir ledgers, their 
housekeeping and their next week's party all into 
the house of God with them. What is the diflTerence 
between them and the sacrilegious hucksters whom 
our Lord scourged out of the Temple with their bird- 
stalls and their money -tables? These worldlings are 
selling stocks or planning business investments or 
deciding about the guests and the invitations for the 
coming entertainment, all the time thatthe}^ are pre- 
tending to be worshipers of him who reads their in- 
nermost thoughts. "You are the first minister who 
has ever preached me out of my flour store," said a 
very frank merchant once to his pastor. We hon- 
ored his candor; but it raised the question, How 
many human bodies may there be before this pulpit 
from which the soul is away ofl!" in broker's oflBces 
and warehouses and political caucuses or in some 
other form of mammon worship? All these per- 
sons maj- collect their wandering thoughts enough 
to join in a very solemn closing hymn, and then they 
will go home without the least compunction for hav- 
ing been Sabbath-breakers in the very temple set 
apart for Jehovah's praise. 

We would not employ harsh or censorious lan- 
guage; but do not all these classes of church-goers 
actually profane the Sabbath bj' utterly ignoring the 
primal idea for which the Sabbath was instituted and 
the sanctuar}' reared? It is not the' question be- 
tween more singing and less sermon, or between lit- 
urgical responses and the silence of the copgrega- 
tion during the services, that *we are now raising. 
It is the far more vital one whether God's day is not 
really violated inside of God's house by all who go 
there, for either minister-worship, or self-worship, 
or mammon-worship, and ofler no shred of hearts 
worship to their Creator. So much is said, and 
properl}' said, about the increasing external viola- 
tions of the Lord's da}', that there is danger of ig- 
noring the internal violation by refusing to worship 
the Lord of the day entirely. In God's sight, where 
is the difference between the man whose body is wan- 
dering in the fields or on the sea shore, and the oth- 
er man whose heart is wandering while his body is 
in a church pew? We raise all these questions sim- 
ply to set people to thinking, and some people, too, 
who imagine that they are fulfilling their duty by 
going to God's house, and j-et never go to God at 
all. Like every other sin, this sin is a sad robbery 
of their own souls. To lose the Sabbath is a terri- 
ble loss; and every Sabbath is lost that does not 
bring our poor, needy, sinful soul right up to our 
heavenly Father and to our only Saviour. Godless 
Sabbaths may lead to a Godless eternity. — Dr. T. L. 
Cuyler. 



we call the Sabbath-school should be rest to all who 
participate in it, even when its order is strict, its 
worship thoughtful, and its intellectual exertions in- 
tense. 

We should not make the Sabbath a dread to our 
young people, but, by kindling in them spiritual 
tastes, and impressing upon them the importance of 
spiritual truth, make them eager to know about the 
"things of the kingdom." They study five days in 
the week in secular schools, and learn nothing about 
God; they need on the Sabbath day to bring the 
same mental forces which are employed during the 
week, and consecrate them to the study of the divine 
character, law and government. 

That Sabbath-school which has the best order, the 
closest programme, the sharpest drills, the most con- 
centrated intellectual attention, the most fervent 
spiritual exercise, is ^/te Sabbath-school which is most 
restful to its members. 

The Sabbath day that is filled from early morning 
until dewy eve with home devotion and conversation, 
public worship and Bible study, is the Sabbath from 
which people go forth rested and invigorated, and 
prepared for the activities of the following week. — 
aS'. S. Journal. 



'A BURDEN." 



An unknown correspondent says: "Don't make 
the Sabbath and Sabbath-school such a time and place 
of discipline, rules, regulations, etc., as to defeat the 
object for which the Sabbath was made — rest. Free- 
dom is dear to all, old and young, and it is fatal to 
induce the child to dread the Sabbath and its duties. 
You are doing nobly, grandly. Beware of ex- 
tremes." 

There is wisdom in this suggestion. The Sabbath 
must not be a day of excessive labor; and it must be 
a day of rest. 

The Sabbath-school is the place of worship; it is 
also a place for Bible study. It is not a sociable; it 
is not a place for lounging; it is a provision for rest- 
ful work in intellectual and spiritual lines; in the in- 
tellectual because of an inner spiritual. That there 
ma}' be profitable study there must be good order. 
There is less wear and tear of the nervous system in 
one hour of well-disciplined order and restraint than 
in one hour of freedom and confusion. 

Rest is change of occupation rather than suspen- 
sion of activity. A true student rests by reading 
lighter or different literature from that upon which 
he has been concentrating his attention closely. A 
laboring man rests by thinking and reading. The 
service of song and prayer and class study, which 



QLAD AUTUMN DAYS. 



The magic voice of spring has gone. 
Her emer lid blades are turning brown ; 

The daudt'lion's ball of lace 
Has given place to thistle-down ; 

The violets have caught the dew. 

And hid it 'neath their bonnets blue, 

And orchard blossoms, pure and sweet, 

Have long since withered in the heat. 

The sickle, sharp and keen, has reaped 
The meadow blossoms, rows on rows, 

The barley lies in winnowed heaps, 
And aftermath luxuriant grows; 

The sumac tall, all touched with change, 

Forms crimsoQ head around the grange, 

And, floating now my path across, 

On gauzy wings is milkweed's floss. 

O, maples all in scarlet dressed ; 

O, spikes of fiery golden rod; 
O, purple asters everywhere 

Upspringing form the sere-grown sod; 
O, blue-fringed gentian, growing tall, 
Thou comest when the leaflets fall, 
Sweet flowers to bloom 'neath golden haze, 
And glorify glad autumn days. 

— VicK's Maganine. 



SOMETHING FOR BOFS. 



Two men stood at the same table in a large factory 
in Philadelphia, working at the same trade. Hav- 
ing an hour for their nooning every day, each under- 
took to use it in accomplishing a definite purpose; 
each persevered for about the same number of 
months, and each won success at last. One of these 
two mechanics used his daily leisure hour in work- 
ing out the invention of a machine for sawing a 
block of wood into almost any desired shape. 
When his invention was completed, he sold the 
patent for a fortune, changed his workman's apron 
for a broadcloth suit, and moved out of a tenement 
house into a brown stone mansion. The other man 
— what did he do? Well, he spent an hour each day 
during most of the year in the very difficult under- 
taking of teaching a little dog to stand on its hind 
feet and dance a jig, while he plaj'ed a tune. At 
last accounts he was working ten hours a day at the 
same trade and at his old wages, and finding fault 
with the fate that made his fellow-workman rich 
while leaving him poor. Leisure minutes may bring 
golden grain to mind as well as purse, if one har- 
vests wheat instead of chaff. — Wide Awake. 



THE GIRL THAT EVERYBODY LIKES. 

She is not beautiful— 0, no ! Nobody thinks of 
calling her that. Not one of a dozen can tell whether 
her eyes are black or blue. If you should ask them 
to describe her they would only say, "She is just 
right," and there it would end. She is a merry- 
hearted, fun-loving, bewitching maiden, without a 
spark of envy or malice in her whole composition. 
She enjoys herself and wants everybody else to do 
the same. She has always a kind word and a pleas- 
ant smile for the oldest man or woman ; in fact I 
can think of nothing she resembles more than a sun- 
beam, which brightens everything it comes in contact 
with. All pay her marked attention, from rich Mr. 
Watts who lives in a mansion on the hill to Sam, 
the sweep. All look after her with an admiring eye, 
and say to themselves : "She is just the right sort 
of a girl!" The young men of the town vie with 
one another as to who can show her most attention; 
but she never encourages them beyond being simply 



October 15, 1885 



THE CFRISTLAJSr CYNOSURE. 



11 



kind and jolly; so no one can call her a flirt; no in- 
ded, the young men all deny such an assertion as 
quickly as she. Girls— wonderful to relate — like 
her, too, for she never delights in hurting their feel- 
ings, or saying spiteful things behind their backs. 
She is always willing to join in their little plans and 
assist them in any way. They go to her with their 
love afTairs, and she manages adroitly to see Willie 
or Peter, and drop a good word for Ida or Jennie, 
until their little difficulties are all patched up, and 
everything goes smoothly again — thanks to her. 
Old ladies say she is "delightful." The sly witch — 
she knows how to manage them. She listens pa- 
tientlj' to complaints of rheumatism or neuralgia, 
and then sympathizes with them so heartily that 
they are more than half cured. But she cannot al- 
ways remain with us. A young man comes from a 
neighboring town, after a time, and marries her. 
The villagers crowd around to tell him what a prize 
he has won, but he seems to know it pretty well 
without any telling, to judge from his face. So she 
leaves us, and it is not long before we hear from 
that place. She is there the woman that everj'body 
likes. — Christian Advocate. 



THE FALL OF A MOUNTAIN. 

Some seventy years ago an old man sat at the door 
of his cottage in the Swiss village of G-oldau enjoy- 
ing the warmth of the summer sunshine, and the 
view of the fresh green valley dappled here and there 
with clumps of trees. All around the great purple 
mountains stood up against the sky, as if keeping 
guard over the pretty little village in their midst, 
with its tiny log huts clustered beneath the shadow 
of the neat white church, like chickens nestling un- 
der the wing of the mother. 

A big, florid, jolly-looking man came striding up 
the path, and held out his hand to the old peasant, 
with a hearty "G-ood-day, Neighbor Kraus." 

"Good-day, Neighbor Schwartz. Fine weather to- 
day." 

"Beautiful. We'll have a famous harvest this 
yea«r, please God." 

"I hope so, neighbor. Won't you sit down a min- 
ute ? It's warm walking." 

"Thanks, I will. Holloa! what's the matter over 
yonder?" 

Right opposite them, five thousand feet overhead, 
towered the dark mass of the Rossberg, the highest 
of the surrounding mountains. Just as Schwartz 
spoke, its huge outline seemed to be agitated by a 
slight tremulous motion, like the nodding of a plume 
of feathers. 

"Well, my friend, what are you staring at ? Did 
you never see the trees shaking in the wind before?" 

"Of course; but it seemed to me somehow as if it 
wasn't only the trees that shook, but the whole 
mountain." 

"You're easily scared," chuckled the old man. "I 
suppose you're thinking of the old saying that the 
Rossberg is to fall some day. Bah! they've been 
saying so ever since I was a child, and it hasn't 
fallen yet." 

Schwartz laughed, and the two friends went on 
talking. But suddenly the visitor started up with a 
look of unmistakable terror; and no wondei'. His 
spiked staff which he had stuck carelessly into the 
ground beside him when he sat down, was moving 
to and fro itself." 

"Good gracious! do you see that, Father Kraus ? 
And look at those birds yonder, flying screaming 
away from the trees on the Rossberg ! Something 
wrong, say what you will." 

At that moment Hans Godrel, the miller, came 
flying past, shouting: "Run for your lives! The 
stream's dried up, and that always comes before an 
earthquake or an avalanche. Run!" 

"Pooh! I'll have time to fill my pipe again," said 
old Kraus, coolly producing his tobacco pouch. 

But Schwartz was too thoroughly frightened to 
wait another moment. Down the hill he flew like a 
madman, and had barely got clear of the village 
when the earth shook under his feet so violently as 
to throw him down. He sprang up again just in 
time to see poor old Kraus's cottage vanish in a 
whirl of dust like a bursting bubble. 

The next moment there came a terrific crash, fol- 
lowed by another so much louder that it seemed to 
shake the very sky. In a moment all was dark as 
night, and amid the gloom could be heard a medley 
of fearful sounds — the rending of strong timbers, 
the hollow rumble of falling rocks and gravel, the 
crash of wrecked buildings, the shriek of the doomed 
inmates, and the roar of the angry waves from the 
lake below, as if all its waters were breaking loose 
at once. 

The last house of the village, on the side farthest 
from the Rossberg, was that of Antoine Sepel, the 
wood-cutter, who at the first alarm snatched up two 



of his children, and made for the opposite hill-side, 
calling to his wife to follow with the other two. 
But the youngest, Marianne, a little girl of six had 
just run into the house, and before her mother could 
reach her, the first crash came. The terrified woman 
seized the other girl, and fied without looking behind 
her. 

But the old servant, Francoise, could think of her 
little favorite under the shadow of coming destruc- 
tion. She darted into the house, and had just caught 
the child in her arms, when the tremendous din of 
the final crash told her that it was too late. la an 
instant the house was lifted bodily from its place, 
and spun round like a top. The child was torn from 
her clasp, and she felt herself thrown violently for- 
ward, the strong timbers falling to pieces around her 
like a pack of cards. Still, however, the brave wom- 
en struggled to free herself, but the weight that kept 
her down defied her utmost strength. For her own 
safety she cared but little, although a violent pain in 
her head and a numbness along her left arm told 
her that she was se\'erely hurt. But where was the 
child? 

"Marianne!" she cried in desperation. 

"Here I am," answered a tiny voice, seemingly not 
far from her. "I'm not hurt a bit, only there's 
something holding me down; and I can see light 
overhead quite plain. Won't they come and take us 
soon?" 

"No, there's no hope of that," said the old woman 
feebly; "this is the day of doom for us all. Say j'our 
prayers, darling, and commend yourself to God." 

And upward through the universal ruin, amid shat- 
tered rocks and uprooted mountains, stole the child's 
clear sweet voice, praying the prayer that she had 
learned at her mother's knee. It rose from that 
grim chaos of destruction like Jonah's prayer from 
the depths of the sea, and like it was heard and an- 
swered. 

How long the two prisoners remained pent up in 
that living grave they could never have told; but all 
at ouce Marianne thought she heanl a voice calling 
her name, and she held her breath to listen. Yes, 
she was not mistaken; there was a voice calling to 
her, and it was the voice of her father. 

Sepel, having seen his wife and the other three 
children placed in safety far up the opposite hillside, 
had hurried back to seek the missing girl. But it 
was in vain that he looked for any trace of the village 
or even the valley itself. The green, sunny uplands, 
where the laborers had been working and the chil- 
dren frolicking but a few hours ago, were now one 
hideous disorder of fallen rocks, bare gravel and 
l)lack cindery dust, amid which he wandered at ran- 
dom, calling desperately upon his lost darling. 

But the answer came at last: a clear, musical call, 
which rose from a shapeless heap of ruin that even 
he had failed to recognize as his pretty little cottage. 
Hurrying to the spot, he began to tear away the rub- 
bish with the strength of a giant, and speedily drew 
forth the child unhurt, the falling timbers, as if by | 
miracle, having formed a kind of arch over her, com- j 
pletely protecting her from injury. | 

Brave old Francoise had been less fortunate. Her , 
left arm was so badly hurt that she never recovered 
the use of it, and to the end of her life she was timid 
and nervous from the eflfects of that terrible night. ! 
But, compared with the rest of the ill-fated villagers 
she might well esteem herself fortunate. Four-fifths 
of them were killed on the spot, many more crippled 
for life, and those who escaped found themselves 
reduced to absolute beggary. Of Goldau itself noth- 
ing remained but the bell of its steeple, which was 
found more than a mile away. The lower end of 
Lake Lowertz, farther down the valley, was com- 
pletely choked up by the falling rocks; and the wat- 
er thus dislodged, rushed in a mighty wave seventy 
feet high over the island in the center, sweeping 
away every living thing upon it. The once happy 
and beautiful valley is still a frightful desert, and 
here and there among the surrounding hills, 3'ou maj' 
find some white-haired grandfather who himself wit- 
nessed the calamity, and will tell you, in his quaint 
mountain speech, liow Rossberg fell upon Goldau. — 
Harper s Young People. 



Tempeeance. 



DRINKING IN ENGLAND. 



The London correspondent of The Nation, writing 
upon "Manners and Morals in England," under date 
of October 20, thus refers to the drinking customs 
in our mother country: — 

"To come to a more serious matter, there can be 
no doubt that intoxication is far less common among 
the middle and upper classes than it was in our 
grandfathers' or fathers' times. One sees this in 
many ways. Thirty years ago people sat over their 
wine after dinner for an hour at least, and drank 
five or six glasses of port. Now they sit, unless 
some interesting subject of talk turns up, onlj- twen- 
ty minutes, and drink two or three glasses at most. 
It is true that more is drunk at dinner, but it is less 
trying to the head then. The number of those who 
drink nothing is large and increases daily, partly be- 
cause many physicians prescribe abstinence, partly 
from philanthropic motives and the desire to set a 
good example to the poor. On the stage, in comic 
papers, in after-dinner speeches, it is still a conven- 
tional joke to assume that people get drunk in good 
society; but in realitj^ the phenomenon is rare. A 
few weeks ago I heard a man of fift}', who had moved 
a good deal in the best circles of London and of a 
university city, declare that he had never but twice 
in his life seen a gentleman the worse for liquor; 
and several persons among the party present declared 
their experience to be similar. Others could not say 
quite so much, but all agreed that, considering how 
common intoxication is among certain classes, and 
used to be among all classes, it had become surpris- 
ingly rare in their own rank. This does not mean 
that there are not still many people who injure their 
health and character bj' the too-frequent resort to 
stimulants, for one hears many lamentations over 
the practice of taking 'nips' and 'pick-me-ups' through 
the day, — a practice alleged to prevail among ladies 
of fashion as well as j'oung men in the cit}'. I speak 
only of intoxication, which has become a mark of 
gross ill-breeding in the society of ladies, and is con- 
demned as 'bad form' even in a party of men." 

8UMPTUA RY LA WS. 

The Delaware Prohibitionist says: "Sumptuary 
laws, according to Webster, are 'such as restrain or 
limit the expenses of citizen's in apparel, food fur- 
niture, or the like.' How much propriety there is in 
calling prohibition statutes sumptuary laws appears 
by a mere glance at the above definition. Their only 
object is to remove from the path of thy citizen temp- 
tations to spend his monej' for that which is not 
bread, but which endangers health, life, happiness 
and morals. Their aim is not to 'limit the expenses 
of citizens in apparel, food, furniture,' or any similar 
thing, but to aid them in procuring more and better 
of all these things. Prohibitory laws are no more 
sumptuary than license laws or quarantine regula- 
tions, or the statutes prohibiting the use of the mails 
for immoral literature. They are police laws, not 
sumptuary laws." 



Tobacco and the Polse. — Dr. Troftski publishes 
the results of a number of observations made by 
him to ascertain the eflects iKoduced on the temper- 
ature and pulse by smoking. He has found that in 
every case, varying according to the condition of the 
individual, there is an exhilaration of the pulse-rate 
and a slight elevating of the temperature. It ap- 
pears, in fact, that if the average temperature of non- 
smokers were represented by one thousand, that of 
moderate smokers would be one thousand and eight; 
and while the heart in the former case was making 
one thousand pulsations, in the latter it would beat 
one thousand one hundred and eighty times. Hence 
the danger of tobacco smoking. 



Kind Deeds. — The Berlin City Missions employ 
thirty agents, who spend most of their time in visit- 
ing the neglected or negligent poor. They distrib- 
ute every Sunday 70,000 to 80,000 sermons among 
those who are prevented from going to church regu- 
larly, and an equal number of church papers find 
their way to the poorer quarters during the week. 
An asylum for discharged convicts is in course of 
erection. 

"Hell Gate Brewery" is the suggestive name 
printed in huge letters on the side of one of the 
largest beer manufactories in New York City. 
Signs sometimes tell a great truth. 



"Serpent of the still ' indeed, when coiled in the 
delicate wine-glass at the rich man's table! A ser- 
pent that stings like an adder, not only the proud 
father, but waits to sting more deeply still the fair 
boy with eyes opening to see good and evil, who 
"looks on the wine when it is red" in his own fath- 
er's hand. How much more cruel than he, who, if 
his child ask for bread, shall give him a stone, is he 
who, in answer to his boy's demands, feeds him with 
poison that shall destroy both body and soul. 

— — m » m 

At the Indiana Yearly Meeting of Friends, 

Sarah F. Willis gave an interesting account of her 
travels around the world in the interest of the cause, 
and branded the Russians as the most intemperate 
Christians. Quarterly meeting reports showed 65 
Friends indulging in alcoholic liquors, 11 raisijg 
tobacco, 31 selling it, and Gdi using it, thus expend- 
ing $5,915 annually. 



J 



iiir 



■-- -.#'»%' 



12 



THE CHBISTIAN CYNOSUEE. 



October 1 5, 1886 



The chtjeches. 



— The Chicago Training School for Bible and mis- 
sionray work will open at No. 19. Park avenue, Oct 
20th. under the prineipalship of Mrs. Lucy Kider 
Meyer. 

— The Illinois Free Methcxiist conference met hvst 
week, in Kev. C. S. Spaulding's church on Tilst street 
in tliis city. Superintendent E. P. Hart presided. 
This is the twenty-sixth annual meeting of this ba<iy 
and tlie churches were well represented. Among 
the committees appointed was one on secret socie- 
ties, brethren C. B. Ebey, Fay. and Fhick being se- 
lected. 

— The I'niteii Presbyterian Synod of Illinois met 
Sept 29ih. at Kirkwocnl. near Monmouth. Kev. T. 
G. Morrow, of P:ixton. the retiring moderator, 
preacheil the oix^ning sermon. Rev. W. S. Clana- 
han. of Viola, was chosen mcxlerator. The Synod 
chose Rev. J. A. Wilson, of St. Louis, synodical 
missionary. Mr. Wilson has a large and prosper- 
ous church which he will hesitate to leave. Strong 
resolutions were adopteil against mail trains on the 
Lord's day. 

— Rev. Galusha Anderson. D. D.. who served the 
Second Baptist church of this city as its pastor two 
years, and the University of Chicago as its president 
seven years, has accepted a call to the pastorate of 
the First Baptist church of Salem, Mass. 

— Representatives from each of the churches at 
Newburg. N. Y.. lately held a meeting to consider 
the advisability of extending an invitation to Messrs. 
Moo*.iy and Sankey to come to that city and hold 
meetings. Mr. Moody expressed his willingness to 
accept the invitation for some time in C)ctober.' 

— In order that there may be a responsible and 
permanent owner of missionary propertj-, it has be- 
come necessary that the faith missionary work car- 
ried on by Dea. 0. M. Brown of Oberlin, be incorpor- 
ated into a society. An organization has therefore 
been made with Rev. George Clark of Oberlin as 
president, and Dea. Brown as treasurer. The 
faith principle and independence of missionaries will 
be maintained as before. Subscribe for the Faith 
Mitiionary of Oberlin. 50 cts. per year, and learn of 
this interesting work. 

— Bishop Weavers character was -arrested" at 
the North Ohio and Anglaize conferences of the 
United Brethren church. The term means that ob 
jections were made to his otticial standing. This ac- 
tion proves that there is not entire subjection to the 
plotting of the managers at Dayton. 

— A new Wesleyan church was organized at Ath- 
ens. Pa.. September 25th, with twenty-four members. 
It is part of the ingathering of a great revival in the 
place last winter. 

— Brethren Kelley, Shemeld and Agnew, who left 
America some months since to devote their lives to 
missionary work in Africa, have settled in Umzilla's 
kingdom on the east coast opposite the southern end 
of Madagascar. They are addressed via Inhambane, 
a town on the coast just under the tropic of Capri- 
corn. They have thus far suffered little from sick- 
ness or inconvenience. 

— While the case of the brethren in Boston fined 
for street preaching is awaiting the action of the Su- 
preme court of the State, preaching on the streets 
and in the Common has gone on unmolested. 

— The Rev. Dr. George F. Pentecost began a 
series of Sunday afternoon services at the Academy 
of Music. Brooklyn, on October 4. He will be as- 
sisted by a large male choir, under the leadership of 
Mr. George C. Stebbins. 

— The growth of the churches connected with the 
United church of Japan during the last year has 
been ver\- marked. Twenty per cent has been added 
to the membership, and the advanf^e in contributions 
has been seventy per cent. 

— A school for the training of Christian workers 
was recently established at Springfield, .Mass. This 
school opened September 9 with very encouraging 
pros[>ects. Students were in attendance from Can- 
ada. New England, the Middle, Southern, and West- 
ern States. The design of the institution is to train 
laymen to be secretaries of young men's Christian 
associations, superintendents of Sunday-schools, and 
helpers to pastors. 

— The annual convention of the Women's Nation- 
al Christian Temperance Union will meet in Phila- 
delphia, October .30th to November .3d, numberina- 
at least two hundred and fift}- delegates. 

— When Mr. McAll began his now famous work 
in Paris he knew just two sentences of French. 
They were, "God loves you," and '•! love you." In 
them is found the key to the note-worthy fact that 



at present in more than thirt}- halls of Paris the 
Gospel is proclaimed every evening in the week, and 
in France SOO.OOO people are brought under Protest- 
ant Christian instruction. 

— At the Indiana yearly meeting of Friends held 
at Richmond last week, the ninth report of the Evan- 
gelical Committee disclosed sixty ministers in the 
work. There were fifty series of meetings and 3,- 
000 converts, resulting in 1,400 accessions. The 
Committee on Foreign Mission work reported iu the 
womaus branch 47 organizations and 370 members. 
They are operating a successful school for girls at 
Matamoras, Mexico, and C. G. Huzzy has donated 
$3,000 toward establishing a boy's school there. 

— Bro. W. T. Ellis, late of Topeka, Kans., has 
opened meetings ever}' evening ,at 329 West Randolph 
street, Chicago. 

— The mission opened in Carpenter hall, N. C. A. 
building, by brethren Loveless, Walker and others, 
is being wonderfully blessed. Conversions have 
taken place at every meeting, some of the saved 
ones being redeemed from the depths of degradation. 
These meetings are held each week-day evening but 
Tuesday. 

— The West Kansas Free Methodist Conference 
beside taking strong action against secret societies, 
adopoted a generous endorsement of the reform press 
in connection with their warm approval of their 
strictly denominational papers, the Free Methodist 
and Earnest Christian. It reads: "There are also 
other publications of reformatory character, whose 
literature is in general pure and elevating, which we 
would commend to the patronage of our people as 
far as practicable, among which we note the Van- 
guard., the Cynosure, the American of Washington; 
and the Christian Statesman, together with some tem- 
perance periodicals." 

— The General Conference of the Mennonite Breth- 
ren in* Christ, will be held Oct. 7th, 1885, at Upper 
Milford, Lehigh county, Pennsjdvania. The subject 
of a printing establishment will be considered. 

— Rev. T. D. Ingle, a j'ear ago last June, was 
struck a severe blow on the head by a rough, at the 
Petersburg, Pa., camp meeting. He had recovered 
from the effects so far as to be able to continue the 
work on his charge, and held meetings protracted to 
great length. But lately he was compelled to give 
up the work and is for the present entirely disabled. 

— Rev. D. F. Wilberforce is now in America for a 
season of rest, after six years faithful service in Af- 
rica as missionary in the emplo}' of the U. B. 
Board of Missions. He spent Sabbath, Sept. 12th, 
1885, with the King Street U. B. congregation, in 
Chambersburg, Pa. This congregation supports a 
school in Africa, and by invitation he came here to 
give some information with respect to the work there. 
His labors were highly appreciated, and the congre- 
gation and Sabbath school raised one hundred dol- 
lars for this mission work. Bro. Wilberforce spoke 
in the A. M. E. church on Monday night to a full 
house. Bro. W. is at present not employed by our 
Mission Board, as he is taking a course of study in 
medicine and expects to be returned by the Board 
to Africa in about one year. — Highway of Holiness. 

— The will of William W. Smith, of Worcester, 
Mass., recently deceased gives his whole estate, val- 
ued at $25,000, to the American Board of Commis- 
sioners of Foreign Missions, for the education of 
colored men in Africa. 

— The Missionary Herald reports as follows in re- 
gard to China: "The table given among the 'Notes 
from the Wide Field' presents at a glance the condi- 
tion of Protestant missionary work in China. The 
facts brought to light are unexpectedly encouraging. 
The communicants in the churches exceed 26,000, a 
number quite in advance of the estimate commonl}' 
made, and more than double the number reported 
eight years ago, at the Shanghai Conference of 1877. 
At the Mildmay Conference, held in London in 1878, 
Dr. Legge affirmed, in reporting 13,000 communi- 
cants, that it was fair to estimate four adherents for 
each one of these church members. On this Ijasis, 
against the 50,'000 souls who were then assumed as 
belonging to professedly Christian communities, we 
may now think of over 100,000 Chinese as standing 
in this relation. This is remarkable progress for 
any land, and is especially remarkable of China, 
where the people move so slowly. Tha increase in 
native assistants is also most hopeful, there being 
now 1,450 such Christian helpers in place of the 
1,040 reported eight years ago. We may well thank 
God and take courage." 

— The Earl of Shaftsbury, the distinguished Chris- 
tian philanthropist. President of the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, and of the Ragged School 
Union since its organization in 1844, and of the Vic- 



toria Institute, and a member and ofBcer of many 
charitable institutions, died on Sept. 24th, in his 
eighty-fifth year. He was the seventh Earl of Shafts- 
bury, was educated at Oxford, where he graduated 
with honor, was elected to the House of Commons 
in 1826, became a member of the Cabinet in Sir 
Robert Peel's first administration in 1834, but de- 
clined an appointment during Peel's second Premier- 
ship. He was distinguished for many years for his 
decided evangelical Christian faith, his devotion to 
the interests of the Christian church, his catholic 
sj'mpathies, his constant endeavors to improve the 
condition of what are called the lower classes. The 
Costermongers elected him a member of their frater- 
nity, and laboring men esteemed him as one of their 
most earnest, sincere and courageous friends. As a 
member of the House of Lords his efibrts were di- 
rected almost exclusively to the adoption of meas- 
ures designed to relieve and improve the condition of 
the humbler classes of society. 



FREE METHODIST TESTIMONY. 



OHIO CONFERENCE ON SECRET SOCIETIES 

Your committee on secret societies wish to report 
as follows: 

Inasmuch as we believe that organized secrecy, in 
all its branches, stands opposed to true Christianity, 
and is condemned by God's Word; that its teachings 
ai-e erroneous and false, and that it works treason 
against God and man; and inasmuch as it has al- 
readj^ gained possession of the reins of church gov- 
ernment in many instances, and is growing within 
nearly all ecclesiastical bodies; therefore. 

Resolved, That we will set ourselves individually, 
and as a church, more zealously in array against it, 
opposing it in every lawful way. Further, that we 
will use all the means in our power to enlighten the 
people in regard to the evil of secrecy, especially 
Freemasonry. 

WEST KANSAS CONyERENCE ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

We quote our book of discipline: "Voluntary as- 
sociations are not necessarily sinful because they are 
secret, but secrecy is always a ground of suspicion. 
Evil works instinctively incline to darkness. Good 
works grow up in light. God commands us to let 
our light shine. Even a good cause under the shad- 
ow of secrecy invalidates its claim to the confidence 
of open and honest men. Grace and guile can have 
no affinity. All secrets, necessary' to be kej^t, can 
be kept without an oath. A bad institution ought 
not and a good one need not be secret." One of 
the dangerous characteristics of secret societies is 
the unwillingness of members to have their claims 
examined and discussed. This alone should keep 
those who desire a clear conscience before God from 
entering their door. Another is the prevarication, 
subterfuge, and falsehood resorted to by adherents 
to keep those outside ignorant of their character. 
This is true to an extent that indicates that demor- 
alization and debauchery of conscience are incident 
to such association. The war against secret socie- 
ties is by no means ended. The enem}' has neither 
surrendered nor lost the virus of his disposition. 
Christian men should be on the alert, and girded for 
conflict. The life and strength of secretism is in 
Freemasonry. This defeated, most other orders 
would naturally succumb. We indict Freemasonry 
as un-American and anti-Christian. Its government, 
its titles, its style, are all undemocratic, calculated 
to foster the aristocracy of a class, and the subjec- 
tion and enslavement of the multitude. The as- 
sumption of Freemasonry to antiquity, morality and 
benevolence are egotistic, absurd, and hypocritical. 
Its principles are corrupt, its oaths un-Scriptural and 
demoralizing, its penalties blood-curdling. The light 
of day is shining in upon its darkness. If men will 
read they ma}' understand. We advise our people 
to be of one mind in withstanding, exposing and re- 
moving this enemy of the kingdom of Christ. 



CALIFORNIA EXCURSIONS. 



Our second California Excursion will, D. V., leave 
Omaha, Neb., Nov. 5th, v. m. next, for Los Angeles 
and San Francisco. We expect our car to stop 
at Denver, Salt Lake City, and other places of inter- 
est along the line, without extra charge to those go- 
ing with us. We invite all, and especially Christian 
people, who wish a pleasant trip to the coast of per- 
petual summer to go with us, as we have been 
through several times and think we can make all 
feel at home that accompany us. Through fare 
from Omaha, $45; from Chicago, $52.50. For fur- 
ther information write me at Lewis, Cass Co., Iowa, 
immediately, so that all will be ready when you ar- 
rive at Omaha on tlie day above mentioned. 

T. K. Bkkkin. 



October 15, 1885 



THE CFBTRTTAjsr CYNOSURE. 



13 



LODGE NOTES. 

—The Grand Lodge of Illinois Free 
masons was held in this city last week. 
Facts of much importance to Anti masont 
were reported by the oiHcers, but it ii 
necessary to wait until next week to fine 
room to report them. 

—The Iowa Knights of Honor met ii 
DesMoines last week. The salary of th( 
grand reporter was fixed at $1,000 pe 
year, and that of treasurer at $200. Th( 
lodge held over a day in order to adopt i 
new ritual and practice the work. 

—At a meeting in St. Louis Fridaj 
night after the riot, of the local assembly 
of the Knights of Labor it was resolved 
that while they regret the violence and 
denounce the killing of Hovey, they will 
raise a fund by taxing each member of 
the order to maintain the strikers. They 
urge the men to stand firm and fight with 
all legitimate means. 

— The Toronto Olobe says: "It is 
learned on pretty good authority that 
certain leading Orangemen in Toronto 
are sounding the rank and file of the or 
der with a view to ascertaining whethei 
the Orangemen generally will not be con 
tent to put up with the imprisonment o: 
Kiel for life instead of his execution." 

— The trial of the Socialists Vollmar 
Bebel, Auer, Dietz, Frohme, Viereck 
Heinzel, Mueller, and Ullrich, which be 
gan at Chemnitz, Germany, Sept 28, wa 
concluded Oct. 7, the prisoners being ac 
quitted. They were charged with beinj 
members of a secret society, the allega 
tions being made in connection with th( 
Socialist congress at Copenhagen in 1883 

— A dispatch from Portland, Oregon 
says: "Mah Yim is on trial here for thi 
murder of See Choy. The case excitei 
great interest. Both men were high mem 
bers of the Chinese Masonic order, anc 
the murder took place in a session of tht 
lodge. The motive for the deed is con- 
jectured to be the betrayal by Choy ol 
^lasonic secrets, but the case is a very 
mysterious one. 

— The "moonlighters" in Ireland are 
actively engaged in forcing farmers tc 
swear that they will not pay their rents 

Rev. J. R. Knodell, pastor of the Con- 
gregational church. Mason City, Iowa, 
writes: 

"Dr. A. H. Hiait, Central Music Hall, 
Chicago: Deak Sir: I am completely re- 
stored. I have no trace of Hemorrhage 
of the Lungs, Nervousness or Salt Rheum. 
I did not use the whole two month's treat- 
ment of Compound Oxygen. I only 
used it for six weeks. My testimony in 
this region is freely given. I distribute 
both written and printed information. 
Yours truly, J. R. Knodell." 

DON'T YOU THINK 

That you can send in a club op six 
or more trial subscribers at twenty- 
five cents each? We continue the 
offer of eight numbers of the Chris- 
tian Cyuosure to any address for 25 
cents. 



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FOB SALE BY THE 

National Christian Associat'n 

ll\ West MadisoQ Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

\ comDlete Oatalosus sent tree on AppUcatloo. 

In the Coils; or, the Coming ConfliJt. 

By "A Fanatic." A hietorical sketch, by a United 
Presbyterian minister, vividly portrayint; the work- 
ings of Secretism in the various relaiions of every- 
day life, and showing how individual domestic, 
social, religions, professional and public life are 
trammeled and biased by the baneful workings of 
the lodge. Being presented in the form of a story, 
this volume will interest both old and young, and 
:he moral of the story will not have to be searched 
for. 81-50 each ; $15-00 per dozen. 

Holden With Cords. Or tub Powbe of 
TOE Secret Empiki-. A faithful representation in 
story of the evil Inlluence of Freemasonry, by E. 
E. Flagg, Author of "Little People," "A Sunny 
Life,"Etc. This iS a thrllllngly Interesting story ac- 
curately true to life because, mainly a narration of 
historical facts. In cloth$1.00; paperSOcents. In 

finney on HEasonry. The character, clai an 
and practical workings of Freemasonry. By Preot. 
Charles G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President 
Finney was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge 
when he became a Christian. This book has openea 
we eyes of multitudes. In cloth, TO cent-; per 
dozen, $7 80. Paper cover, 36 cents; per dozen- 

ia.8C. 

Tha Broken Seal; or Personal Reminiscence" 
of the Abduction and Murder of Capt. Wm Morgan. 
By Samuel D. Greene. One of the most interesting 
books ever published. In cloth, 75 cents, per dozen, 
*( 50 Pape- covers. 40 cents; per dozen, $3.50 

Secret Societies, Ancient and Modfern. 

A bock of great interest to officers of the army and 
navy, the bench and the clergy. Table of Con- 
tents- The Antiquity of Secret Societies, The Life 
of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The Origin of 
Masonry, Was Washington a Mason? Fillmore and 
Webster's Deference to Masonry, . . iJrief Outline of 
the Progress of Masonry In the United States, The 
Tammany Ring, Masonic Benevolence, the Uses of 
Masonry, Ari Illustration, The Conclusion 60 cents 
each : oer dozen. $4, 75, 

Ex-President John duirc.,' Adams* 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obliga- 
tions and Penalties. Thirty most Interesting, able 
and convincing letters on the above general subject, 
written by this renowned statesman to different pub- 
lic men of the United States during the years 1831 
to 1833. With Mr. Adams' address to the peo.ile of 
Massachusetts upon political aspects of lodgery; an 
Appendix giving obligations of Masonry, and an able 
Introduction. This is one of the most telling anti- 
secrecy works extant, aside from the Expositions. 
" - - -'--^ ». nn. T^^r rtnzen. i9.00. Paper. 8£ 



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COLLECTION BOXES. 

Do Yon Want Money for missionary, church 
or Sunday-school purposes? It Is surprising how 
much the children will collect with the 
FAIRBANKS' SAVINGS BOXES 
They are simple and cheap. Price 3 cents each 
T. B. AKNOLD.^Publisher 
106 Franklin St., Chicago, 111. 



Special Inducements 

To Christian Workers in the United 
States, 



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Bound in French Morocco, protecting edges, elastic 
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No. I. Smallest size SI 00 

No. II. Medium size 1 Wi 

No. III. Large size 2 75 

For a short time we will mail to parties in the 
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No. I ForTOc. No. II For «1 10 

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Better Binding of Bagster's and Oxford Bibles 
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Complete Bible Catalogue sent free on application 



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This Bible is specially prepared for Mothers, S. S. 
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S. R. BRIGGS, 

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DR. PEIRO hasdeTotcd23yearstothespeclaltree.tinentof Catarrh, 
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Hon. Wm. Penn Nixon, Ed. Inter Ocean, . . Chicago. 

F. H. Tubbs, Esq., Manager W.U.Tel. Co., . ChlcagT). 

Cen. C. H. Howard, Mrs. T. B. Carse, - - Chicago. 

O .W. Nixon, M. D., Mrs. Netta C. Rood, » Chicago. 

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N. li.—Our Oxygen is sifely sent anywhere <n the United States, Canada 
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V* [The at ove is as frood a representation of Gaskell's Compendium as it is possible to give in an ordinary 
■^ coarse cut on so small a scale.] 

5 The idea of publishing a COMBINATION for self-instruction in Penmanship on this plan Is original with 
' the author of this COMPENDIUM. We have manv very good books on this subject, excellent so faras books 
a go. But Penmanship Is an abt that must be acquired by well-directed practice, and the material for such 
i prac. ice must be such as the owner can use separately from everything else. No one ever learned to 
write well from any book alone. 

' Here we have Copy Slips, consisting of Movement Exercises for beginners, the Principles, Alphabets, 

' Notes, Kecelpts, Addresses, Verses, Commencement and t losing of Letters, Ladies* Penmanship, Card and 

! Album Work, etc., etc. Ornamental Work on the slips and ona sheet by Itself. Uft-hand Flourishing of Birds, 

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* when first purchased. 

The CojiPKHDiUM complete, as above is mailed, prepaid to any part of the world, for ONE DOLLAR. 

^ Address 



THE G. A. GASKELL CO., 



Box 1534 New York City. 



MARKET REPORTS. 

CHICAGO. 

Wheat— No. a S7}4 @S8 

No. 3 81 

Winter No 2 9i}4 

Com— No. 2 431^ 44 

Oat8-No.2 273^ 

Rye— No. 3 «) 

Bran per ton 10 60 

Flour 1 75 @5 00 

Hay— Timothy 8 00 @12 00 

Mess pork per bbl 8 3.5 

Butter, medium to best 11 @2I 

Cheese 05 @10 

Beans 1 15 @1 60 

Eggs 1" 

Seeds— Timothy 1 65 @1 75 

Flax 1 18 

Broomcorn 03 @ 06>^ 

Hides— Green to dry flint 07X @ 14 

Lumber— Common 11 00 @18 00 

Wool 14 @28 

Cattle— Choice to extra 4 20 @5 35 

Common to good 2 25 @4 65 

Hogs 3 00 @4 05 

Sheep 3 75 @4 75 

NEW YORK. 

Flour 8 00 @5 25 

Wheat— Winter 933^ @1 01 

Spring 93M 

Com 46 @53 

Oats 30 (0)39 

Mess Pork 9 50 

Eggs 163^ 

Butter 8 23 

Wool 13 @37 

KANSAS CITY. 

Cattle 3 60 @5 40 

Hogs 3 65 @4 85 

S^ieeo 1 50 03 00 




jl4 -*:*_Bi!-««=««=3.«Ki:s..:2iJj. ^3 plan; 

* * * Thi marveh us hou e hTs been budt more than 
SOOti nesiiomourp uis id o? Iljlannt tliititaffords 
Tin le ro m e\eQ lor a laige UmiH I'-t 11 or shown 
a'lnvc on 2d floor are 4 bed rooms ind in itfic 2 more. 
Wenty ol Closets The \ hole w i-nied by one chimney. 
Larire illustiations and lull des,cnption olthe above 
as well as of 39 other houses, raneingin cost from $-100 up 
to $6,500, may be loimd in "Shoi'peli.'s Modkrn Low- 
Cost Houses," a large quarto pamphlet, showing also 
how to select sites, get loans, <tc. Kent postpaid on re- 
ceipt of 50c. Stamps talv-en. or send SI bill and we will re 
tarn the chanire. Address, Bf II.niNG Pl.AN AsSOCIATIOM, 
IMeuttou this Paper.) 2i Eeekman St., c Box 2702,) N. Y. 

Advertisers who wish to secure the at- 
tention of the best class of purchasers, 
will find it to their advantage to secure 
space in ^4 VEBT8TIAN OTNOSURE. 



OXJ]R CLXJB LIST. 



NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE! 

Families are making up their lists of 
periodicals for the coming year. Friends 
can order their denominational papers 
through us and save money. 

We still send an extra copy of the 
Christian Cynosure to those getting up a 
club of ten at $1.50. 

We give below a list of papers which 
we offer with the Christian Cynosure at 
reduced rates: 
The Cynosurb and — 

The Christian 12 50 

The American ( Washington) 2 50 

Western Rural 3 00 

The Missionary Review 3 00 

Christian Herald (N. Y) 2 75 

The Truth (St. Louis) 2 50 

Illustrated Christian Weekly 3 90 

New York Witness 2 50 

Union Signal 3 00 

Christian Statesman (Phila.) 3 50 

The Interior 3 85 

The Independent 4 25 

The S. S. Times 3 50 

Gospel in all Lands 3 50 

The Nation 4 50 

New York Tribune, Weekly 2 50 

Chicago Tribune, Weekly 2 50 

Chicago Inter Ocean, Weekly 2 50 

Harper's Magazine 4 75 

North A raerican Review 5 75 

The Century 5 25 

Scientific American 4 25 

Buds and Blossoms 3 10 

Pansy 3 35 

Vick's Magazine 2 50 

American Agriculturist 3 60 

If any complaints arise in regard to 
any periodical ordered, write direct to the 
publisher or to us if more convenient and 
we will forward your request. 

If stveral of the above papers are 
wanttd, or any paper not in this list, 
write for special rates. 

W. L Phillips. Publisher, 

231 W. Madison street, Chicago. 



KmOHTS OF I-YTHIAS IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

By a Past Chancellor. A full illustrated exposition 
of the three ranks of the order, with the addition of 
the "Amended, Perfected and Amplified Third 
liank." The lodge-room, signs, countersigns, ^Ips, 
etc., are shown by engravings. 25 cents each; p«r 
dozen, »2.00. Address the 

I^ATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 

ai W. Madison St., CHiOAa* 



.^^^ 



14 



THE CHIlISTIA|L£YNpStrRE. 



October 15, 1885 



HOME AND HEALTH. 

HOPE AS A REMEDIAL MEASURE. 

It is perfectly useless for us to attempt to 
portray the influence that "hope" exerts 
upon mankind. It is a proverbial fact 
that a man without hope in the litrht for 
life is already half whipped. The sick 
man without hope is desperately ill in- 
deed, however slight his physical ailment 
may be. It is equally as true that there 
is a very slight chance for the undertaker 
to be benefited in the case of a patient 
who has no disposition or idea of dying. 
The whole system, digestive, circulator}-, 
and nervons. is directly under the influ- 
ence of the mind: and if we will ever 
bear this in mind in treating our cases, we 
will often have a more potent remedy, 
easy of administration and more pleasant 
to give and take than anything found in 
the country doctor's saddle-bags or upon 
the shelves of our metropolitan pharma- 
cists. Bad news, grief or sudden disap- 
pointment has been known to reduce the 
circulation to a minimum, to cause a 
strong man to become as helpless as a 
child and to arrest the process of diges- 
tion and assimilation assuddeulv as if "the 
patient's throat had been cut. Just the 
reverse of this may be obseived under the 
influence of pleasant emotions, and the 
life giving power of bright, heaven-born 
hop>e. 

My yoi.ng friends, never enter a sick- 
room unless your countenance, manner, 
and words are such as to comfort and 
cheer your patients. However slight 
their hope may be, make use of that little, 
encourage and stimulate them to exercise 
that fortitude coupled with reasonable 
hope which has tided and will tide many 
a patient over dangerous shoals where 
medicine would have" been utterly inef- 
fective. — Southern Clini'-. 

SITTING IN ROOMS WITHOUT FIRE. 

There is great danger to health at this 
season of the \-ear from remaining any 
length of time in a room without fire, ex- 
cept in active exercise. The warning of 
discomfort is not felt as in cold weather, 
and yet the amount of sickness proves 
the necessity of carefulness. A word to 
the wise is suiHcient. 

BONE FELOX. 

The London Lancet tells how to cure a 
bone felon. As soon as it is felt put di- 
rectly over the spot a fly blister the size 
of your thumb naO. Let it remain for 
six hours, at the expiration of which 
time directly under the surface of the 
blister may be seen the felon, which can 
instantly be taken out with the point of a 
needle. Unfortunately we can testify to 
the value of this remedy from experience. 
— Wtitern Advocate. 

RESPECT THE BODY. 

A writer in the Hearth and Home has 
some sensible ideas on the subject of bod- 
ily health He says: 'Respect the body. 
Give it what it requires and no more. 
Don't pierce its ear or pinch its feet; don't 
roast it by a hot fire all day and smother 
it under heavy bed covering all night; 
don't put it in a cold draught on slight 
occasions, and don't nurse or pet it to 
death; don't dose it with doctors' stuffs. 
Respect the body; don't overwork, over- 
rest, or over love it, and never debase it, 
but be ab.e to lav down when you are 
done with it a well worn, but not mis-used 
thing. Meanwhile you will find it a most 
e.xcellent thing to have— especially in the 
country." 

S.iND-BAG FOR THE 3ICK-R00.\I. 

One of the most convenient articles lo 
be used in a sick room is a sand bag. Gel 
some clean, fine sacd, dry it thoroughly 
in a kettle on the stove: make a bag about 
eight inches square of flinnel, fill it with 
dry sand, sew the opening carefully to- 
gether, and cover the bag with cotton or 
linen cloth This will prevent the sand 
from .sifting out and will also enable you 
to heat the bag quickly by placing it in 
the oven, or even on top of the stove 
After once using this you will never again 
attempt to warm the feet of a sick per- 
son with a bottle of hot water or a brick. 
The sand holds the heat a long time, and 
tlie bag can be tucked up to the back with- 
out hurting the invdWil— Health and 
Home. 

There is considerable excitement in a 
town in Chenango county over a case of 
infanticide, the hcr^uicd being a woman. 
Is she any more criminal tban hundreds 
of her sisters who murder their unborn 
children? A leading physician of large 
practice says the public have no idea of 
the extent of this crime. — Freeman'^ Jour- 
nal, Coopertown, N. Y. 



HOKSFORD'S ACID PHOSPHATE. 
Beware of Imitations. 

Imitations and counterfeits have again ap- 
pered. Be sure that the word "Hoksfokd's" 
Is on the wrapper. None genuine without It. 



Great Barg-aiiis 

IN ANTI-SECRECY WORKS. 
For four months, beginning July 1. 
we are enabled to offer the following 
great bargains in our literature: 
FOE ONE DOLLAR. 
The Clin'sti'an C'l/nosure ionv months 
to ^■E^v subscribers and any one of 
the following selections of Books and 
Pamphlets: 

SELECTION NO. 1. 

Holden with Cords, paper 50 

Minutes of the Syracuse Convention and 
seven valuable "addresses 25 

Proceedings of Pittsburg Convention, and 
ten addresses by prominent men 35 

Hon. Thurlow Weed on Morgan abduction 05 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self-con- 
demned, or reasons why their members 
cannot be fellowshipped by the United 
Presbyterian church. With an appeal to 
young men. By Rev. J. W. Bain 20 

Freemasonry as a religion, by Eld. J. Day 
Brownlee ". 05 

A review of two Masonic addresses, by Eld. 
John G. Stearns 05 

Cynosure four months to new subscriber. .' 50 

Total ..$1.85 

AU for one dollar 

SELECTION NO. 3 

Freemasonry Illustrated, three degrees, 

paper 40 

Minutes Syracuse convention, etc 35 

Proceedings Pittsburg convention, etc 25 

Freemasoiiry as a Religion, Eld. Brownlee 05 
Review of two Masonic addresses, by Eld. 

Stearns 05 

Batavia Convention pamphlet .'. 25 

Freemasonry, etc., Selt-condemned, Bain". 20 

Cynosure four months, etc 50 

Total $1.95 

All for one dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 3. 

Revised Odd-fellowship, illustrated, paper 50 

Holden with Cords ,50 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Self-con- 
demned, by J. W. Bain 20 

Freemasonry as a Religion, Brownlee 05 

Review of two Masonic addresses, Stearns 05 

Thurlow Weed on Morgan abduction 05 

Cynosure for four months 50 

Total $i.s5 

All for one dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 4. 

Knight Templarism Illustrated, paper 50 

Holden with Cords 50 

Freemasonry and Kindred Orders Seif-co'n- 

demned. Bain 30 

Eld. Steams' reyiew of Masonic addresses. 05 

Proceedings Pittsburg Convention, etc 25 

Cj/?to.yM?-e four months 50 

Total 12.00 

All for o?i£ dollar. 

SELECTION NO. 5. 

Hand-Book of Freemasonry, by E. Ronayne 35 
Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 30 

Eld. Stearns' Review " ' 05 

Holden with Cords _,, .50 

Proceedings Syracuse Convention,' etc! ! ! ! 25 

Thurlow Weed Pamphlet 05 

Cynosure four months .' 50 

Total $1.90 

All for mne doUar. 

SELECTION NO. 6. 

Knights of Pythias, illustrated 35 

Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 30 

Review of Two Masonic Addresses , ijy Elil. 

Steams . 0.5 

Ritual of the Grand Army of the Republic 10 

Proceedings Syracuse Convention, etc 25 

ProceedinKs Pittsburg Convention, etc 25 

Holden with Cords .50 

C.yiuitture for four months Jo 

Total $3.10 

AU for (me. dollar. 

SELECT. 0-; NO. 7. 

Finney on Masot>ry ,3.5 

The Broken Seal 35 

Freemasonry and Kindred orders Self-con- 
demned, Bain 30 

Eld. Steams' Review 05 

Proceedings Pittsburg Convention, ete ! ! ! ! 35 

Cyri/jniire for four months ,50 

J''^^ ;•: $1.70 

All ff/r wie d/iWir. 





r»j 




'■•#i!?«V.'i- 



ILLUSTEATED RITUALS! 

t> . ,^.^,,,, C°™Pl'^^'5"W0KK.and"SECEETS": 

|th to 141h Ma^,iiK de8r,«. Tl.rec • ,Ji„„^, $1 each. KMlj-bt, of 
fytblai, SUMjU, A Iw other lllo..trate<l riUiali. .«nl ,ml paid.'Cata- 

SC2^; ^^y?"^ Christian Association, 221 W«t . 
MaduoilStrMt, CLkaso, Illliiou, U. S. A. 



thirty halls of Paris the 
ry evening in the week, and 
are brought under Protest- 

ly meeting of Friends held 
he ninth report of the Evan- 
[sed sixty ministers in the 
[ series of meetings and :?,- 
in 1,400 accessions. The 
ission work reported in the 
izatioiis and BTtl members, 
icessful school for girls at 
C. G. Huzzy has donated 
g a boy's school there. 

fite of Topeka, Kans., has 
ining .at 329 West Randolph 

in Carpenter hall, N. C. A. 

Iveless, Walker and others, 
ssed. Conversions have 
eting, some of the saved 
the depths of degradation. 

bach week-day evening but 

1 

ree Methodist Conference 
m against secret societies, 
I'sement of the reform press 
warm approval of their 
Dapers, the Free Methodist 
It reads; "There are also 
ormatory character, whose 
re and elevating, which we 
patronage of our people as 
ig which we note the Va7i- 
American of Washington; 
in, together with some tem- 



ii|lj1i;&3i5ailJll-k 

■ ■MimiM Ill • 



toria Institute, ____.,_ _ _ 
charitable instiSTOVE CO., 

bir.'.'^-eSANT STS., ALBANY, N. Y. 

with honor, wasiERS OF 

tSpeSrS AND FURNACES. 

^M^IKS^est Shore" Range. 

decided evangel 
the interests of 
sympathies, his 
condition of wh 
Costermongers i 
nity, and labori 
most earnest, si 
member of the 
reeled almost e 
ures designed 
the humbler cla 

FBEE 

OHIO C0N13 

Your commit- 

as follows: 

Inasmuch as 

all its branches, 

and is condemn 
are erroneous i 

against God ar OUR 

read}' gained po 

Sraii" cS:? ASANT HOME PARLOR 

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WEST KANSAS 

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sociations are n( 
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Evil works insti 
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our light shine, 
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ice of theMennoniteBreth- 
d Oct. 7tli, 1885, at Upper 
ennsylvania. The subject 
^t will be considered. 

year ago last June, was 
le head by a rough, at the 
!eting. He had recovered 
to be able to continue the 
3ld meetings protracted to 
he was compelled to give ow or secrecv ii 

^* C^ueeii Anne" a.ncl '^Eastlake" Cooks 

FOR COAL AND WOOD. 



I have used the Littlefield Stove and can fully recommend it. 

W. I. PHILLIPS. 



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ly tilled witb able and evangelical ai«'s to tbe lesson. 

IT CO«^TA.irf S : 
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Opening Remarks. 0, Lesson Dictionary, containing 
the time; places; persons, and contemporaries of the 
lesson, witb the proper pronounciation of tbe names, 
and places. 7. Notes and explanatloas. 8. Questions. 
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i^'KEEMASONRY 

BY 

JE3. n.03sru^'X'a»-3e3, 

Past ItlaslJT <»r K4-3<stoue L.04igc, 

Wo. 0:il>, Chicago. 

Illustrates every siprD, grip and ceremony of the 
Lodge and given a brief exi)lanation of each. This 
work Hhould be scattered like leavas all o^er the 
country. It is so cheap that it can be used as 
tractH, and money thuH expended will bring a boun- 
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Per lOO. $3.60. Address, 

National Christian Association, 

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BIRNEY. 

The sketch of JAMES G. BIRNEY, 
candidate of the Liberty Party for Presi- 
dent, in pamphlet for 25 cents. A limit- 
ed number of copies of this handsome 
pamphlet for sale at the N. C. A. office. 

MASONIC OATHS, 

BY 

Paiiit Iflastnr of KcyHlone Liodge, 

Wo. OaO, Ciiit-ago. 

A masterly discussion of the Oaths of the Masonlo 
Lodffe, to which is appended "Freemasonry at a 
Glance," illustrating every sign^ grip and cere- 
mony of the Mayouic Lodj^e. This work is highly 
commended by leading lecturers as furnishing the 
best arguments on the nature and actual charBC- 
ter of Masonic obligations of any book in print. 
Paper cover, 207 pages. Price, 40 cents. 

National Christian Association, 

331 Wtist Madison St. ClM«as:o, Sii. 

RE VISED ODD-FELL WSHIP 
ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, Encamn- 
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sketch oft lie c,rlg|ji,hl.story and character of the order, 
over one Imndrrdfdui-note fiuotatlonsfrom standard 
authorities, Kii.jwlng the character and teachings of 
thP^ order, (inri :in niKilvsis of each degree by President 
.1 '^I?,?'^""''''- ^'"' 'itual correeponds exactly with 
the^ Charge Books" furnished by the Sovereign Grand 
Lodge, In cloth, 81.00; per dozen, S8.00. Paper cove-, 
. /cents; perdo2en84.no. 

All crders promptly filled by the 
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1^1 



October 15, 1885 



•i'HE CHRISTIAN CYlSrOSTmE. 



15 



FARM NOTES. 



COAL ASHES. 

Many persons make no use of coal 
ashes, but it certainly is an excellent 
mulch, "particularly for evergreens," so 
says an old gardener, and gardens where 
the soil baked badly have been brought 
into excellent condition by spading in 
coal ashes, after other things had been 
tried without success. Fertilizing quali- 
ties are not claimed for coal ashes, but it 
gives depth to the soil in a very inexpen- 
sive way. It makes it work easier, serves 
as a mulch, and insects are not fond of 
working in it. — Vick's Magazine. 

HOW IT IS DONE. 

lu order to utilize in the gardt-n the 
waste from the house at the least expense 
first purchase a barrel of unslacked lime, 
then take an empty barrel and begin by 
putting in it a layer of soil or ashes, and 
then the waste from the house, everything 
that cat or dog will not eat. Keep this 
decaying vegetable matter covered with 
an inch of soil or ashes, using coal or 
wood ashes. Once a week in winter, and 
oftener in summer, cover with lime, say 
half an inch. The lime will be slacking 
of course, and should be kept dry, but as 
lime retains its virtue a great while, the 
one barrel will last a year or more, ac- 
cording to the waste kept. 

If starting this experiment in the au- 
tumn, early in the spring empty the con- 
tents of the barrel into the garden beds, 
cover with coal ashes, if the soil is not 
already deep enough and spade it in. 
Should the soil be deep and good,' the 
compost can be used witliout the ashes, 
then when the weather is right, put it on 
the plants. — Vick's Magazine for October, 

— As to poultry, the importance of ex 
ercise is an every day experience. Pat 
accumulates in all those breeds which are 
especially good as table fowls when they 
are allowed free access to feeding troughs 
or when corn is scattered upon the ground 
iu excess of immediate consumption 
Games are a partial exception to this rule, 
and the only one. Leghorns, Spanish 
and Hamburgs, are natur-illy so active 
that if they liave a chance to forrtge, they 
will neglect the feed thrown to them, for 
the love of foraging and the early worm 
Games do the same thing, and if these 
breeds have only rery contracted quarters 
they will make the most of their limited 
opportunities. Asiatics, D.irkings, the 
French breeds, Plymouth Rocks, and uu 
merous general purpose fowls, and the 
Polish, or top knotted breeds generally, 
will fatten up, stop laying, and become 
nearly or quite barren, besides being ex- 
posed to cholera and many other ills that 
fowls are liable to. Flocks of fowls 
among our neighbors have recently suf- 
fered greatly from cholera. In almost 
every case that has been closely investi- 
gated, it was found that they were freely 
fed several times a day, and either con- 
fined to small yards, or they were large 
fowls, disinclined to forage or wander 
about, except when hungry. The first 
symptom was abdominal fat, then it was 
noticed that they staid long upon the 
roost in the morning, and went early to 
roost at evening, and that egg-laying 
csased; then cholera swept off nine-tenths 
of the flock It is a good rule never to 
feed fowls unless they will run when 
called to be fed, and to stop throwing out 
grain the moment any of them cease to 
run after it. In the summer time, once 
feeding daily is usually enough for fowls 
that have the run of the fields and pick 
up their living. — American Agriculturist. 



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In the Coils; or, the Comingr Conflijt. 

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Holden With Cords. Or the Powee of 
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Finney on SXasonry. The character, clai as 
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General Wasbing-ton Opposed to Se- 

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History of the AJ)duotion and Muraei 

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ON FREEMASONRY, 

Light on Freemasonry. By ekut v. 

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The Master's Carpet, or Masonry and Baal 
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pm"K soTOifp 8S im^s. ifSagliS «®i57, ste ssafe 



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Mah-Hah-Bone: comprises the Hand Book, 
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Adoptive Masonry Illustratod. A full 
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Grand LoDSE OF Illinois. Judge Daniel H Whit 
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Stearns' Inquiry into the Nature and 
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Masonic Oatha Null and "Void; or, Free- 
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Masonry a Work of Darkness, adverse 
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The Mystic Tie, or Freemasonry a 
IiKAGOK WITH THE DEVIL. ThIs Is an accouut of 
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Are Masonic Oaths Binding- on i.oe In- 
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Oaths and Penalties of the 33 De- 

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ON ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

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Exposition of the Grange. Edited by Rev 
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Freemasonry a. Fourfold Conspiracy. 

Addres.s of Prest, J. Blanchard, before the Pittsburgh 
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A Masonic Conspiracy, Resulting m a 
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account of a Masonic murder, by two eye-wltnesseh, 
By Mrs, Louisa Walters. This is a thrlllingly inter 
esting, true oarrativB aO wct« sact i>sj josqa. 

Sermon on Secret Societies. By Rev, 
Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn, The special object 
of this sermon is to show the r ght and duty of 
Christians to examine Into the character of secret 
societies, no matter what object such societies pro 
fess to have. 6 cents each ; per dozen, BO cents. 

Discussion on Secret Societies. rs- 
lilder M B Ncwcoiinr .-.nd Eider G W, Wilson, « 
Royal Arch Jilason. This discussion was first pub 
llshed In a series of articles In the Church Advocal 
25 cents each; per doz $2.00. 

Prest. H. H. George on Secret Societies 

c! powerful .address, showing clearly the duty ol 
Christian churches to disfellowship secr»t societies 
10 cents each ; per dozen. 75 cents. 

Secrecy vs. the Family, State anc 
Cii'Rca. By Rev. M. S. Drury. The antagonlsL 
of organized secrecy to the welfare of the famllj 
state and church Is clearly shown. 10 cents each- 
per dozen, 75 cents. 

Narratives and Arguments, showiUi tnt 
conflict of secret societies with the Constltuv.OD 
and laws of the Union and of tb" States. Bj 
Francis Semple The fact that sec societies In 
terfere with the execution and pe.rvtii the admlnls 
tratlon of law Is here clearly proved 15 cents each 
\jsi dozen, $1 26. 

Sermon on fv'iasonsy, i-y Rev. j. D:iy 

Brownlee. In reply to a Jlasonic Oration by Rev. 
Dr. Mayer, WcUsvi'lIe, Ohio. An able Sermon by 
■in able* man. 5 cents each ; per dozen 50 cents. 



iilstorr liat'l Christian Association 

Its o.i-lgln, ^J'iects, what it has done and aims to dc, 
nnd the best, means to acco:npllsh the end sought; 
Che Articles of Incorporation, Constitution and By- 
«wsof the Association. 25c. lach, per doz, $1.50, 

Secret Societies, Aucient and Modem, 
.1ND College Secret Societie?. Composed of 
the two pamphlets combined in this title, bonnii 
together in Cloth. $1.00 each; per dozen, $9.00. 

lyCorgan's Exposition, Abduction and 

.! ; BDE.s, AND Oaths OF 33 P-r.-nEES. Composed of 
Freemasonr. Exposed," by Capt, Wm, Morgan, 
History of the Abduction and Murder »f Morgan:' 
Valance's Confession of the Murder of Capt, W n 

xiorgan;" Bernard's Reminiscences of Morgar 

Times" atid Oatlis and FenaltieB of 33 DegrecR 

KM nas :-. 

National Christian Association. 



^3SSSS^ 



^ I w^gaiaij— 



- ,^»«M 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October 15, 1886 



^■E^VS OF THE WEEK. 



WASHINOTOS. 

A Statement prepared at the Treasury 
Department shows 'hat the amount of 
standard dollars put into circulation dur- 
ing the month of September in the regu- 
lar course of that business -was $-\ TW.t>*H.>. 

In former jears ;housands of clerks 
were acccstomed to go home to vote. Now 
the government clerk who says he is go 
ing to Virginia. New York or Ohio to 
vote is a rarity. It is not at all that they 
do no want to exercise the right of suf- 
frage, but they dare not. 

President Cleveland and Secretary Man- 
ning announce that they will go to Xew 
York and vote the straight ticket. 

COCSTKT. 

The preparations being made by the of- 
ficers of the various live slock breeders' 
associations for their annual meetings in 
Chicago during the continuance of the 
American Fat Stock and Dsiry Show in- 
dicate an unusually large gathering of the 
prominent live-stock men from all por- 
tions of the L'nited States and Canada. 
The eighth annual fat stock and dairy 
show will be held at the Exposition Build- 
ing. Chicago, commencing Tuesday, Nov. 
1". nest, and closing 10 o'clock, a. m. 
Thursday, Nov. 19. The attendance at 
the last fat stock show exceeded 100,000, 
and there is every reason to expect a much 
larger attendance at the nest. 

The Xew Y"ork Daily Commercial Bui- 
Utin of Oct. 6, estimates the lire loss of 
the United States and Canada for Septem- 
ber at $6,52-5,000, which is less by $3,- 
7<X>,t.H>j than in September, 1S84, and 
some $?>IX>,(k;iO less than the average Sep- 
tember fire waste of the past ten years. 

The flour production of Minneapolis 
last week reached 171,060 barrels, heating 
all former weekly records by nearly 20,- 
"hVi barrels. The market rules dull" and 
inactive. 

The accounts of the Union Bank, of 
Halifax. N. S., are being investigated, the 
accounts of the cashier, Henry Y. Clarke, 
showing a deficiency of about $30,000. 
The defaulter has not absconded. 

The American Free Trade League an- 
nounces a national conference to be held 
in Chicago, Nov. 11 and 12 next. 

The custodian of the Sault Ste. Marie 
Canal reports to General O. M. Poe that 
the business of the canal was greater dur- 
ing the month of September than for any 
month in Its history, exceeding that of 
any previous month by more than 16,000 
tons. An interesting fact in that connec- 
tion is that the traffic for the month named 
exceeded that of the Suez Canal nearly 
30,iXhj tons. 

The Neu Enyland IJomtHUad reports 
the Eastern potato crop as fully one-third 
below the average of last year, and small- 
er in size. 

Near Lufkin, Texas, Oct. 4, sixty con- 
victs who were working on a road made 
a determined attempt to escape. The 
guards opened fire, killing or wounding 
twenty-five of the men. Every effort will 
be made to capture those who avoided the 
bullets. 

Rev. Timothy Thirloway, a Congrega- 
tional clergyman, swore before the Grand 
Jury at Green River, NVy. T., Monday, 
regarding the recent mas.sacre at Rock 
Springs, that the Chinese fired their own 
dwellings to better protect their money, 
which was buried under the floors. 

The large stables of C. L Johnson, an 
extensive dairjman, at Atlanta, Ga , were 
burned and 12S head of cattle perished in 
the flames. Most of these were tine bred 
cows. Several hundred tons of bay were 
also destroyed. 

As the inauguration of reform in his 
life and habits, George: Gash, a gambler of 
Clinton, III , took all of his sporting para- 
phernalia to the public Hjuare Tuesday 
night and set fire to them. 

Pittsburg celebrated Wednesday fhe 
opening of the Davis Island dam, wLich 
has been seven years in construction and 
cost $;i/XKj/XX). A procession of boats 
and steamers carried guests and notabili- 
ties to the dam, where speeches were de- 
livered. A display of fireworks at night 
concluded the celebration. 

Mrs. Veronica Bulla, a demented wom- 
an, began to fast Aug. 10 at Syracuse, X. 
Y., and died Thursday. For fifty-nine 
days she lived entirely upon water, in 
which was dissolved a small quantity of 
morphine. 



Arthur Nettletou, who killed Clarence 
VThite. one of a charivari party, at Paw- 
paw, recently, was found guilty of man- 
slaughter at Dixon. Ill, Tuesday, and sen- 
tenced to twelve years' imprisonment. 

The threatened strike of streetcar em- 
ployes at St. Louis was inaugurated Tues- 
day afternoon, three-fourths of the men 
taking part. But few cars are running, 
and being fair week, with thousands of 
visitors in town, the people are greatly 
inconveneinced. Thursday the riot broke 
out. A crowd of strikers gathered, who 
pulled a driver from bis car. the man fall- 
ing in such a way that he was run over bj' 
the wheels and dangerously hurt. The 
mob next unhitched the mules and shoved 
the car, with ten others, down the incline 
the collision smashing the vehicles to 
splinters. The police appearing on the 
scene, a fight followed, the oflicers using 
their batons with great effect. Seven- 
teen of the rioters were arrested, and 
many others were badly wounded. The 
authorities, fearing a renewal of the con- 
flict have sworn in special police- 
men. The strikers have assumed a men- 
acing attitude. Friday the mob made 
demonstrations in several localities, threw 
street cars from the track and in some 
cases gave the occupants barely time to 
leave the cars. The skull of one conduc- 
tor was broken by a blow, and a police- 
man shot and killed a rioter. Several 
fights between the people and police oc- 
curred in which serious wounds were in- 
flicted. A call was made for 500 special 
officers. About twenty five cars on dif- 
ferent lines were overturned by the rijters 
and partially wrecked. 

Five white men and two Indian who 
engaged in the recent anti- Chinese riot 
near Seattle, Wash. Ter., have been in- 
dicted for murder in the first degree. 

The Massachusetts Democratic conven- 
tion was held at Worcester, Thursday, 
with John E. Fitzgerald as permanent 
chairman. Ex-Mayor Frederick O. Prince, 
of Boston, who was opposed by the But- 
ler faction, was nominated for Governor 
on the second ballot. 

At San Francisco, Thursday, a building 
owned by Chas. Crocker, of the Central 
Pacific railway, and occupied by a whole- 
sale stationery and printing firm, and oth- 
er concerns, was burned, together with 
its contents, the loss exceeding $500,000. 
Four men were buried in the ruins. 



At Orangeville, Ont., the residences of 
two officials prominent in efforts to en- 
force the Scott temperance act were 
wrecked by dynamite, the inmates escap- 
ing unhurt. No arrests have been made. 

A row of thirteen eight-story ware- 
houses in Aldergate street, London, was 
almost totally destroyed by fire, Thursday 
with the contents The losses aggregate 
about .si 5,000,000. 

Mexican robbers attacked a pack mule 
train carrjing bullion, near Parral, a sta- 
tion on the Mexican Central road, killed 
four of the escort and drove off with the 
treasure, the amount of which has not 
been determined. 

The small pox has broken out in Ham 
ilton, St. Catharines and Guelph, Ont. At 
St. Catharines the Salvation Army is 
charged with spreading the malady by 
mixing freely with the people after hav- 
nursed patients, and threats are made to 
close or burn the (jUfirtera of fhe Salva- 
tionists. There were 51 deaths from the 
disease at Morlre.Hl Tuesday. That night 
about 300 rioters attacked the guard at 
the exhibition grounds and threw stones 
at the cavaliy, when a full guard of the 
mounttd garrison, including artillery, 
turned out and the mob so'ui di-^persed 
One hundred carpenters wirkcd night 
and day at the exposiiion buddings get- 
ting them ready for occtipation as a 
small pox hospital. 

Servia'.r, warlike altitude has compelled 
the Sultan to issue a decree mobilizing 
the entire Turkish army. 

Iti.5 stcted that M Nelid;.ff ihe Rus- 
sian embassador, has raised a difficulty in 
the Roumelian conference. lie desires 
that the article in the Berlin treaty giving 
Turkey the right to send troops to East 
ern Rvumelia be abolished, in the event 
of the union of the two Bulgarias. 

Official af'vices have been received from 
RasAlula, the commander of the Abyssin- 
ian expedition marching to the relief of 
the beleagured garrison of Kassala, t.j 
the effect that after a severe battle the ' 
Abyssinians defeated a large force o 



dervishes under Osmau Digna, and that 
3.000 dervishes were killed in the encoun- 
ter. The Abyssinian General is now 
rapidly marching on Kassala. 

OUT THIS OUT 

and place it conveniently for reference: 

Tracts number 11, 13, 21, 23, 24, 27, 

29, 31. 34, 40, 41 and 49 are out, of print 

and none will be printed during this year. 



A GOOD MANY 

Tl.MES ONE WANTS TO REFER TO SOME 
.VRTICLE IN THE Cj^nOSW?'*, BUT THE NUM- 
IJERS .\RE KEPT LOOSLY AND SOME ARE 
LOST, AND THE ARTICI.K IN A HACK NUM- 
BER CANNOT BE FOUND. To MEET THIS 
DIFFICULTY WE HAVE MADE ARRANGE- 
MENTS TO FURNISH THE 

EMERSON PATENT BINDER 

TO ALL WHO WISH IT FOR ONE DOLLAR. 




Each issue op the Cynosure as it 

ARRIVES CAN BE EASILY ADJUSTED TO 

THE -Binder and then it is in shape to 

BEVERY EASILY REFERRED TO. EACH 

Binder will hold the issues for a 
year, when the volume can be re- 
moved and bound permanently, and 
THE Binder is ready for the nioxt 
year's papers. 

The Binde will be sent postpaid 
ON receipt of the price, $1.00 

NOVELTY RUG 

MACHINE. Pat'd 

Dec. 27, 1S81. For making Rugs, 
Tidies, Hoods, Mittens, etc. Sent 
by mail with full directions. Price SI. Agents wanted. 
Manutac.tui-ers of stamped Bug Patterns and dealers 
in Yarns, E. KOS.S & CO., Toledo, O 




COLONY dUU,UUU g^,,. rocIc, Haho. so to 

640 acres toeaclisettlei. *1.50peracre-50cts.ca8h— 
$1. In 3 years. Climate and soli same as California. 
Send for circular and prospectus. Also Colony lands 
In California. Monthly excursions, $52.60. 

Wm. H. Martin, 126 Washington St., Cliicago. 

Lesson Quarterly. 

Contains the same matter as the Light and Life 
Lesson Leaf, hound in a quarterly form, with maps 
and other helps. It also contains many suggestions 
and Instructions concerning the management of the 
Sunday-school. Price, per quarter, .3 cents. 

T. B. ARNOLD, Publisher. 

lOfi FrankWn street Chicago, 111. 

.'facrKSPoiis to i'Iocstox, kkan & Co., 

CPIIOiVGO, ILI^. 

IIEOEIVE DEPOSITS, GUANT DIS- 
COUNTS, FOREIGN EXCHAN^JE, 
COLLECTIONS. 

A line of CHOICE InvestniiMits always on hand. 




$16 



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Oruiid II:i|>i<l.'^ UtMlroom Suit, 
nee pic<'eH. .M;tlj<igaiiy finished, bevel 
ale Kla-.n. I'lUMh Parlor Hull 8 eompleie, 
:i, Tapesi ry cjiritet-j, 50 (Merits. Ingrains, 
c. No. ? Range, complete. «11, 
The Newhcrry Furniture Company, 
284, 28*; and 288 Wahash av. Only one Suit 
Customer. Open evenings. 



AGENTS K^iS*""'** '"^S?^ 

Holder. . A(?entg 

have grand BUc<;eH8. aiimr , 

HouBekeepers will""""^ ' 
have from i to 6. I 

Send for circulars,? 
and He© what it in} 
anyhow, e. W.Rideb, Pacini:, w.». 




COMPOUND OXYGEN 

( ures Lung, Nervous 
and Chronic Diseases, 
oaice audiHoraeTreat- 
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M D., a scientific 
physician of exten- 
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ment to all parts of the 
country. He has hun- 
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to Its efficacy from 
prominent persons. 
Price reduced. Pam- 
phlets and Information 

mailed free. Address A. H. HIATT, M. »., 

Central Music Hall, Chlcafo. 

LOOIi AT THK 

AND SEE IF YOUR STTBSCEIPTION EX- 

PIBES THIS MONTH. IF IT DOES, 

PLEASE LET US HEAR FROM 

YOU AT ONCE. 

WAYI ANn A Christian School, flts boys and 
■•"' t-""U, girls for the best colleges, business 
or teaching. Expenses very low. Terms begin Sept. 
10, .Jan. ,'i, Mch. 31. G. F. Linfikld, Prln., 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

TODD SEMINAEY FOR BOYS. 

Fall tei'in begins Sept. 1.5. A delightful home, with 
kind, parental care, and thorough Instruction. Am- 
ply equipped for thirty pupils. 

REV. U. K. TODD, A. M., Prin., Woodstock, III, 

Smitlmlglit's Astlima and Hay 
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iGUAiiANTY. Sample free. 
L. Smitiinight, Cleveland, O. 



ASTHMA. Si 



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TO INTRODUCE 



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lour business 
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changed. GAY «fc BBOS.12 BarclaySt.tN. Y. 

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easily cured. Advice free. 

oB. J.C. HOFFMAN, Jeflerson, \Vi8. 

The handsomest, spiciest 
original little gem you ever 
saw. into thousands of new 
liiimes, wp offer to send the Philadelphia 

LADIES' 

Home Journal 

AND 

PRACTICAL 

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lllusti .ted by be'-t artists, printed on fine eream 
tinted papei, and carefully edited by Mrs. Louisa 
K\ KPP Fmploys the best writers. 

Splendid DonrtESTic Stories ! 

by Mai'ioii II:irl:iii<l. S!!>ry Abliott Rand, Hel- 
en Wlnslovv, John'» Wife, Clariasa I'otter, 
Helen Ayre. 

A series of stories for the girls. Hints on dress and 
etiquette. How to entertain &c. Mrs. Lambert's 
Fashion Ijettei's, with answers to correspondents, 
practical and helptnl. "How to dress well and eco- 
nomically." , . , , , . 

"Scribbler's Letters to Gustavus;"arich feast of wit, 
humor, and keen satire, to be read to husbands. Writ- 
ten by Mrs. Emmii C. Hewitti appears in each number. 

J A n: 




A page (le\ nti'd ex.^hisively 
to the call' nt iiilants ami 
youiit; rhilihen. I'Mlleil with 
interesting' li'lli'is lioin siih- 
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paper to every young nioth- 
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Artistic Needleworic 





that a novice wi 



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Willi special illustrations. 
Knittiiifer, Crocheting, and all 
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indnstriOB for women, are in- 
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no trouble in following them. 



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painting, and all kinds ot embroidery. 

Home Cooking 

recipes cmtributed by subscribers. 
This is a Speeial Feature with us, and 
is considered the hent and mo.-.t 
l>riief i<':il de]i!irtm''nt ever pub- 
lished ill ;i[i\ huiseh'tlfl )inper. t*fiy.- 
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ternfjon teas, or sruatl evenin,' eonii^anies, 
ihat are not too exp(;nsive. The Home 
<'ookijjir pa;,'e, with its helps and hints, is 
invaluable to every practical housekeeper. 

MUSIfMT.. STUniES, by Margaret il. Harvey, 
arc popular and he pful to beginners in music. 

FI-OUAf- UJ3PAKTMEXT, illustratetl nnd 
carefu ly edited by Klxm K. Kcxford. Letters Irom 
Hul>serit>ers nnd answers to <'or'"espondents on a I 
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publish'd; and so popular that, in less than two years. 
it has (.'Mined a circulation of 'Ti^.OOO copies each 
issue. Address; 

I..AI»1KM* HOUR fIOUK»rAl4, rhila.. Pa. 





Cyno 




'IN SECRET HAVE I SAID NOTHING."— Jesus Ghrisi. 



Vol. XV III., No. 5 



CHICAGO, THTJESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1885. 



Wholb No. 808. 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

'221 West Madison Sfo-eet, Chicago. 

.1 . P; STODDARD General Agknt 

W. I. PHILLIPS Publisher. 

Sdbscbiption pee year $2,00. 

If paid strictly in advance $1.50. 

S^^No paper discontinued unless so requested by the 
subscriber, and all arrearages paid.„^S 

Address alJ letters for publication to Editor Christian 
Cynosure, Chicago. Writers' names must always be 
given. No manuscript returned unless requested and 
postage enclosed. 

Address all business letters and make all drafts and 
money-orders payable to W. I. Phillips, Treas., 221 
West Madison Street, Chicago. Currency by unregistered 
letter at sender's risk. When writing to change address 
always give the former address. 

[ Entered at the Post-offlce at Chicago, 111. , as Second Class matter. J 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial : 

Notes and Comments 1 

Finding the Seam 8 

Death of Cardinal McClos- 

key 8 

Will Gen. Butler join the 

American party .... 8 

Giving Place to the Devil. 8 
The Memphis Assassins. . . 9 

Personal Mention 9 

Contributions : 

JeS Davis. . . > 1 

Cagliostro,Freemason and 

impostor 2 

Freemasonry (Poetry) 7' 

Selected : 

Sun Worship and the 

Third Degree Tragedy . . 3 
Clubism and Christi- 
anity 3 

An Example of Manly In- 
dependence 3 

Returning to the Old 

Ways 4 

Address to Iowa Voters r. . . 4 



Correspondence : 
No Shading off in Wor- 
shi-i; The N. C. A. and 
the Cynosure in the 
South : Good Templars 
and Prohibition ; Pith 

and Point 6 

The Secret Empire: 

Masonic Chronology 3 

Financial 5 

Literature 5 

Bible Lessons 6 

New Hampshire iSotice 9 

The Home 10 

Temperance 11 

The Churches 12 

Lodge Notes 13 

The N. C. a 7 

The American Party 7 

Churches vs. Lodgbry 7 

Lecture List 7 

Farm Notes 14 

In Brief 15 

News op the Week 16 

Markets 13 



The Hail of this city, while other papers have 
room for nothing but Ohio politics, is deserving the 
praise of every decent citizen for its effort to cleanse 
the Augean stable of our county courts, beginning 
at the grand jury. That body is described as more 
fit for the penitentiary than the criminals upon whom 
it passes. Doggery owners, saloon vagrants and 
managers of "Dago dives," are so thick that saloon- 
keepers who violate the law are as safe in their 
hands as if they were forsworn Freemasons. A Cit- 
izen's Committee of Safety is now at work to secure 
a respectable board of County Commissioners, the 
purification of the grand jury being one result of 
their success. Honorable citizens must learn, more- 
over, that the same principle which excludes saloon- 
ists from the grand jury, so that the hot beds of 
crime be no longer sheltered, will equally well apply 
to Freemasons whose oaths are surely as binding as 
the good fellowship of a groggeiy. 



Mrs. Judith Ellen Foster has succeeded in iowf> 
in her effort to divide the counsels of the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union. Following up her ef- 
fort in St. liouis last year in the National meeting 
of the Union, after an all-day's discussion the Iowa 
Union, meeting last week in Iowa City, voted against 
endorfeing the prohibition movement in politics. We 
hope that is as far as her influence will go, and that 
the next National gathering, to be held in Philadel- 
phia next week, will maintain the position so ably 
taken by the organization. The Illinois Union 
meeting in Jacksonville Oct. 6th to 9th, reaffirmed 
the action of the National Union by an almost unan- 
imous vote. Miss Mary A. West, pro tern editor of 
the Union- Signal, was in the chair and was re- 
elected. 



The city of Freeport, Illinois, has found the roller 
skating rinks the cause of so much trouble, that the 
Aldermen have unanimously voted a license of $500 
in the hope of suppressing the only one existing in 
the city. This suggests a melancholy sight on 



Washington Boulevard, the fashionable street of the 
West Side in this city. The great stone church occu- 
pied up to three or four years ago by the Third 
Presbyterian churcb, one of the largest in the city, is 
now pulled down to make room for residence flats, 
while the rest of the block is filled up with a new 
roller rink of the largest dimensions and evidently a 
place of popular resort. The old church had the 
most stately steeple in Chicago, which has for many 
years been a landmark in that part of the citj'. Near 
by another fine stone church is also being rebuilt 
into residences, while farther toward the business 
center stands a deserted Universalist church; the 
old 1st Congregationalist church, whose seats are 
now in Wheaton College chapel, is now used as a tomb- 
stone office; and farther still, the old Fulton street 
Presbyterian church, where Dr. R. W. Patterson used 
to preach, long used as a soap factory and planing 
mill. The Episcopal diocesan cathedral and the 
Free Methodist chapel are about the only Protestant 
church edifices remaining in use in a large and popu- 
lous section of the city. 



The Ohio election last week was for two or three 
days a grand Republican victory of 17,000 majority, 
and with such a jDreponderance of that party in the 
legislature that the re-election of John Sherman was 
assured. But the Democratic wire-pullers of Cincin- 
nati have learned a thing or Wo from their compa- 
triots in Chicago and New York and, realizing that 
the vote of the city will decide the fate of the legis- 
lature and of Sherman, thej;' are fighting to keep 
back the returns and perhaps play the Mackin game. 
So ,as the week ended neither side would yield, and 
the Democratic press is managing to b''iugon a most 
desperate encounter. At one time last week a riot 
was imminent, and only the most earnest effort 
of prominent citizens prevented. Such an outbreak 
may occur no one can tell how soon unless the bum- 
mer politician is taken by the throat and such prin- 
ciples as ennoble the American platform actuate our 
citizens. 

The Prohibition vote though not, perhaps, so large 
as many had anticipated was a fair one and a nota- 
ble gain upon the St. John vote. It is estimated at 
from 20,000 to 30,000, or about double the vote of 
last 3'ear. In certain localities, as at Oberlin, there 
have been exceptional and cheering accessions to the 
Prohibition ranks, while the action of the party in 
some parts of the State in declaring "for open 
methods" as opposed to the secret societies, is even 
better still. On all sides it is conceded that the 
Prohibition vote gained as much from the Democrats 
as Republicans. This was to be expected from the 
position of the party and Gov. Hoadly, its mouth- 
piece, who declared openly in favor of the saloon 
and forced the fighting on that line. Foraker and 
the Republicans trying to avoid it, yet were opposed 
to prohibition. The vote therefore it was foreseen 
would be close, and the liquor men saw their oppor- 
tunity. They held the casting vote. The liquor as- 
sociations met in all the cities on the Sabbath before 
the election to decide the matter, and no one who 
had carefully reviewed the situation could doubt 
that they were as safe with the Republicans as with 
either and the Germans had always voted with that 
party. The Prohibitionists may add this then to 
their record that they have narrowed the issue in 
Ohio until both the great parties have fallen into the 
hands of the saloonist. 



The late Earl of Shaftsbury was one of the most 
eminent examples of Christian philanthropy. For 
many years he took an independent part in politics 
devoting himself to the amelioration of suffering and 
to the improvement of the condition of the working 
classes. He was oftener, probably, chairman of pub- 
lic meetings than any other man of modern times. 
He thus came to be well known by large classes of 
of people, and his uniform practical benevolence en- 
deared his name to the masses. At his funeral a 
dense crowd filled Westminster Abbey and hundreds 
of poor people were compelled to stand without in 
the rain. The Philadelphia Press tells a good story 
of the Earl, which racily illustrates the popular re- 
spect shown towards him even by the criminal class- 
es, who, recognizing in him an impartial lover of 



mankind, became themselves the guardians of his 
property, proving how much better than bolts and 
bars is a well-earned reputation for philanthropy. 
The story goes that once the Earl of Shaftsbury lost 
his watch while walking in the New Cut, an unpleas- 
ant neighborhood infested with vile characters. He 
advertised his loss, as he valued the trinket for cer- 
tain associations. Within twenty-four hours his 
household was aroused by a violent ring a.nd knock 
at the street door, and the wheels of a vehicle were 
heard rapidly disappearing in the distance. On 
opening the front door a sack was found filled with 
something that moved. On investigating the sack a 
boy of the Artful Dodger class was foun'd, bound 
hand and foot and gagged. Round his neck was the 
missing watch, and underneath was a placard with 
the words: "Lock 'im up, mi lord, he's a disgrace to 
ourn perfession, he order known as how yer lordship 
was free of the wud; giv' 'im five years 'ard. Yer 
Friends." The Earl did not take the advice of "his 
friends." He reformed the Artful Dodger, and 
eventually he became a light of the London shoe- 
black brigade. 



JEFF. DA VIS. 



BY GEO. W. CLARK. 



The bold hero, indeed, lackaday ! 
Too cowardly to fight, so ran away. 
And thereby "lived to fight another day." 
But, alas 1 in taking his inglorious flight, 
Was caught in rather a ludicrous plight, 
His denials to the contrary notwithstanding. 

It is of no earthly consequence, perhaps, whether 
Jefl Davis attempted to escape in his wife's garb, or 
whether he attempted to elude the boys in an "old 
wagon," or whether he went up in a balloon never to 
be seen or heard of again. A man so utterlj' desti- 
tute of moral principle and of patriotic feeling as to 
plot and organize treason against one of the most 
liberal and democratic governments on earth, — a 
government of the people, by the people, and for the 
people, — I repeat, a man so utterly selfish and un- 
principled as to organize and involve the country in 
a terrible fratricidal war with all its barbaric horrors 
and miseries, and all for the maintenance and per- 
petuation of the inhuman s^^stem of chattel slavery 
— of such a man, I say, it would be marvelous, in- 
deed, if he did not lie about his humiliating defeat 
and his inglorious attempt to escape from his cap- 
tors. It was natural enough he should make a des- 
perate effort to evade the doom which he knew he 
justly deserved for so atrocious a crime; and it was 
equally natural he should resort to the most promis- 
ing expedient under the circumstances, to accom- 
plish his purpose; — and then what could j'ou expect 
but that such a man should lie about it? 

You ask the "old Liberty Singer" for information 
on the subject. My son, George W. Clark, Jr., was 
captain of the companj', under Col. Pritehard of the 
ith Michigan Cavalry, which surrounded the camp 
and captured the rebel squad. 'My son was writing 
a series of letters at the time from the army which 
were published in the Rochester Dtmocrat. He was 
on the spot and familiar with all the facts in the case 
and kept us posted. I quote from the Rochester 
Democrat and Chronicle: 

"We have before noticed that our fellow-towns- 
man, Mr. George W. Clark, had a son in Col. Pritch- 
ard's -1th Michigan Cavalry, which captured the flv- 
ing rebel, Jeff. Davis. Capt. Clark sends the follow- 
ing highly interesting account of the movements of 
General Wilson's forces in his great raid through 
Alabama and Georgia, and the capture of Jeff. Davis, 
both of which he participated in: 

" 'On the morning of the 7th of May, 1865, Gen- 
eral Wilson received intelligence that Jefl'. Davis was 
somewhere in the lower part of Georgia trying to ef- 
fect his escape. On the evening of the 7th Col. 
Pritehard received orders to take his regiment and go 
in search of the fleeing rebs. We hurried out about 
nine o'clock and marched south all night and halted 
about 10 o'clock a. m., and fed. We then moved on 
through Hawkinsville to Abbeville. Here Col. 
Pritehard took fifteen men from each companj' and 
pushed on. On the evening of the 9th we ran across 



i#"^»%. 



THS CHKISnAN CYKOSOKES. 



October 22, 1886 



a negro who told us of a oaiup of rebs about a mile 
west of Irwins. Irwins countv. near a smiill creek. 
About 10 o'clock we sun-ouuded the camp. One 
company was sent round to the road in the rear of 
their camp and the balance of the regiment was 
formed in the roadjready to charge in at the first 
peep of dawn. They had no pickets postetl and evi- 
dently considered themselves in a state of security. 

•• 'At daylight, at a given signal, we chargeil into 
the camp, Capt, Hudson leading the advance, Xo 
resistance was made. The teamsters had just fed 
their stock, and the occup.ints of the wall tents were 
yet in the anus of Morpheus, until aroused by the 
shouts of our soldiers. The camp was immediately 
surrounded to prevent any escape. Jeti'. and his huiy 
hearing the noise, made preparations to decamp. 
Hastily jumping out of bed Jert". donned his wife's 
dress, th^ew a shawl or hood over his head, and with 
his wife on one side and his wife's sister on the oth- 
er, came out of the tent and passed to the rear. 
There they ran onto one of the videttes, who halted 
them, and asked them where they were going. Mrs. 
Davis said they wanted to go to the spring to get 
s<,ime water for her mother! — meauiug Jefl". George 
Munger ijf Company ••C," who was the vidette, said, 
••I don't care where you w;mt to go, but that womou 
icith the man's loots on must stai/ ic/ure i/oii are.'" He 
then escorted them back to Col. Piitchard where 
poor Jetl'. was allowed to assume his proper apparel. 
Jefl. said to Col. Pritchard. "Sir, do you call this hon- 
orable! this thieving charge into the camp of help- 
less, unprotected women and children? I pronounce 
it thefi! theft!" 

•• -The party was traveling with five wagons and 
three ambuh\uces with no escort; JetF. having dis- 
pensed with his escort some days before. The party 
consisted of Jell"., his wife and four children, Gener- 
al Reagan. Col. Harrison. Col. Johnson, Col. Morris, 
Col. Lebock. Lieut.- Hathaway; also Mrs. Davis's 
sister and her brother, and the young lady's waiting- 
maid. 'While these events were transpiring a party 
came up the road in the rear of the camp and at- 
tacked LieuL Burinton and his camp. They were 
supposed to be the First 'U'iscousiu, of McCook's 
Division. Lieut. B. hailed them and told them he 
was of the 4th Michigan, but thev paid no attention 
to him. and as he could not decide whether thej- 
were rebels or our solders, on account of the gray 
uniforms which they wore, the skirmish commenced 
in dead earnest, and before the mistake was discov- 
ered we lost two men killed and Lieut. Boutelle 
wounded. This was a sad aflfair and threw the whole 
party into deep gloom. But the capture of Jefferson 
disjicrsed this feeling. 

•• -The prisoners were placed under a strong guard 
and we turned our faces for Macon, which place we 
reached on the 13th ult. Jefl' rode on horseback and 
in the ambulance with his wife and children. At 
night their tents were pitched for them and they 
were made as comfortable as circumstances would 
{>ermit. Three lines of guards were posted around 
their tents, the whole enclosed in a hollow square, so 
that all chances for egress or escape were completely 
cut otf. .Some of our bo\'S called Jeff, an old rascal, 
etc., when Col. Johnson called Col. Pritchard and 
said, -Colonel, your men are insulting the Fresi- 
dent" .' .' Col. Pritchard assured him that every re- 
spect should be shown Mr. Davis while under his 
charge. On the morning on which the capture was 
made Mrs. Davis called Lieut. Davis into the tent 
and said to him, -Lieutenant, do not allow your men 
to agitate the President, for he is a ver^- desperate 
man! ' Lieut. Davis replied in a very polite manner, 
"Madam. 1 do not suppose there is a man in this 
regiment who is at all afraid of the ^President!' When 
coming to Macon President Lincoln's proclamation 
was handed Jeff. Davis. At first he turned white and 
red by turn.s, then trembled violently. He had heard 
nothing of it before. 

■• 'Jetf. Davis wore a suit of gra\' cassimere, with 
top-boots, a light-colored felt hat, linen shirt and 
buck-skin gloves; appeared about GO; wore gray 
whi-skers and gray mustache and graj- hair; talked 
very little; appeared morose and taciturn. Mrs. Da- 
vis is large, coarse, has swarth}- complexion, large 
mouth and teeth and slightly inclined to embonpoint; 
has black hair and eyes, but is not intcllig'^nt look- 
ing. Most of her leisure was spent in reading her 
Bible to Jeff. The childrea are intelligent, appear- 
ing well-bred, and withall good-looking. The eldest 
is about nine jears of age. They were escorted to 
the Lanier Hcuse by the 4th Michigan Cavalry, 
where thev alighted and were conducted to their suite 
of apartments to prepare for an audience with Gen- 
eral Wilson, and make preparations for their journey 
to Washington. Macon was crowded with citizens 
and soldiers all anxious to get a glimpse of the 
"Presilxnt!" Good order was maintained through- 
out and ever}- respect shown the "state i^risonerl" 
At 7:20 the train bore the party towards Washing- 



ton accompanied by Col. Pritchard and a portion of 
the 4th Michigan, who are to escort him to Wash- 
ington, via Atlanta, Augusta and Savannah. On 
this campaign we marched incessantly, captured their 
four principal inland cities, destroyed millions of 
dollars worth of public property and burned millions 
of dollars worth of cotton." '" 

In addition to this account I quote a few extracts 
from 'ihc official reports of Col. Pritchard, Gen. 
James H. Wilson and Adjutant J. G. Dickenson, all 
of the 4th Michisian Cavalry, and who were person- 
ally knowing of the facts and circumstances of Mr. 
Davis"s capture, and whose statements completely 
confirm the report above made by my son; and which 
prove the denials made by JetT. Davis and his Post- 
master, GeneralJohn H. lleagaa, to be false. 

Gen. Wilson say?: "It is as certain as any fact in 
history can be, that Jeff. Davis was halted while at- 
tempting to escape from camp dressed iu a woman's 
full-length traveling robe and a shawl, accompanied 
by two women and seeking in the early dawn to pass 
himself oft" as a woman." 

Col. Pritchard of Allegan, commander of the regi- 
ment, in his official report made to Secretary Stanton 
of the capture of Davis, says: "May 25, 18G5. — On 
the afternoon of the 23rd I received orders from the 
War Department through General Wilson, directing 
me to procure the disguise worn by Davis at the 
time of his capture, and proceed to Washington and 
report to the Secretary of War. Accordingly I went 
over to the steamer Clyde and received from Mrs. 
Davis a lady's waterproof cloak or robe which Mrs. 
Davis said was worn by Mr. Davis as a disguise at 
the time of his capture, and which was identified by 
the men who saw it on him at the time of his arrest. 
On the following morning the balance of the disguise 
was procured, which consisted of a shawl, and was 
identified and admitted to be the one by Mrs. Davis. 
These articles I brought to Washington and turned 
them over to the Secretary of War." 

Adjutant J. G. Dickenson of Detroit, in his report 
made weeks before either General Wilson's or the 
Keagan letter, says: "I recollect distinctly the cap- 
ture of Jeff. Davis by the 4th Michigan Cavalry. I 
was personally present when Davis endeavored to 
escape from his camp in female attire, when with the 
assistance of three of our men I arrested and put 
him under guard. While I was talking with B. N. 
Harrison, Jefl'.'s secretary, private Andrew Bee of 
Company L called to me and said, 'There goes a 
man dressed in woman's clothing!' As I turned he 
pointed towards three persons moving towards some 
thick, dense woods near the camp. They were mov- 
ing slowly and closely together. The one in the 
middle was tall, the dress not being long enough 
to cover a pair of boots and spurs. They had passed 
Andrew at the spring of the wall tent which was 
nearest to where I stood, saying something about 
going for water, I was impressed at once that this 
was Jeff. Davis, and I spurred my horse forward 
shouting "Halt! halt!" and as T reached them with 
m}' revolver bearing upon Davis, the party halted. 
Then up dashed two of our men. Corporal Munger 
of Company I, the other's name I do not remember. 
They came up on the right flank and at once took in 
the whole emergency, for they brought their arms to 
bear upon Jeff, instantly. The tall figure was not to 
be mistaken though dressed as a woman. The dress 
was not a perfect>fitting garment, but was unmistak- 
ably^ ft woman's dress. Besides the dress, he had 
closely about his head and shoulders a black shawl 
or mantel, which concealed his face and shoulders, 
but through the top of this I could see his gray hair. 
Both the other women were bareheaded; one was in 
a loose nightdress which showed much haste in her 
preparation. This was Mrs. Davis. The other was 
completely attired, and proved to be Mrs. Davis's 
waiting-maid. One of the women cried piteously. I 
ordered the whole party back to their tents to which 
they moved slowly and reluctantly." 

My son, Captain Clark, and the officers above 
named, from whom I quote, are all still living and 
can verify these facts. They are matters of record 
and so will go down the stream of time as a strange 
page in history. The fact is, from the beginning of 
his secret plotting for the overthrow of this govern- 
ment that he might build a slave empire on its ruins; 
through all the stealthy steps of his treachery; 
through the covert remc)val of war munitions from 
the North tfj the South; the denouement of his trea- 
son and rebellion with all its horrors and sufferings; 
his inhuman treatment of our defenseless soldiers in 
his prison pens; the shameful abandonment of the 
people he had duped into such a needless and fratri- 
cidal war, to suffer the consequences; to the disgrace- 
ful and humiliating finale — or "fizzle," crawling out 
in "woman's guise" — Jeff'. Davis proved himself not 
only a traitor Ijut a "sneak," and merits the scorn and 
contempt which the world justly pours upon him. 

Detro-it., Mich. 



GAGLIOSTBO, FREEMASON, AND FRINGE OF 
IMPOSTORS. 

Carlyle has made some impression on the world 
by his sledge-hammer strokes at all manner of shams, 
couched in language not always fully appreciated by 
the common people, but enjoyed by those who can 
at once feel the full force of hit style. It need not 
surprise any one that such a writer, who commands 
readers among the most talented men in different 
countries, occasionally tears the mask from such glar- 
ing pretenders as Freemasonry and kindred orders, 
ancient or modern. Illustrative of his styie we sub- 
join a few extracts from "The Diamond Necklace," 
which ma}' be new to some of our readei's. The top- 
ic has reference to the time of the French devolu- 
tion, when the Masonic virtues of secrecy and si- 
lence consigned their suspects to the dungeon and 
guillotine: 

"By the side of the River Seine walks, haggard, 
wasted, a Joaillier-Bijoutier de la Reine with Neck- 
lace in his pocket. 

•'The Quack of Quacks has now for years had 
him in leading. . . . Poor Rohan had become 
a dissolute, violent, vapoury mud volcano, but black 
Egyptian maize must be laid on him. . . . Let 
the orchestra, soft warbling, strike up their fara-tara, 
fiddle diddle dee!" 

One man Carlyle dubs a "denizen of Rascaldom," 
another "a bottomless slough of falsity, vanity, gu- 
lositj', of foulest material. . . . His Columbs, 
demonic Masonries, Egyptian Elixir's, what is all this 
to the light-giggling (Madame) Lamoth." 

By Cagliostro's "greasy, prophetic, bull-dog face, 
said to be the most perfect quack face of the eight- 
eenth century, we can assure ourselves that all will 
turn to the glory of Monsigneur, to the good of 
mankind, and of Egyptian Masonry. Tokay flows 
like water . , . suppers of the gods, Nights, 
suppers, too good to last!" 

The Necklace trial lasted nine months (in 1786) "to 
the astonishment of parlementiers and quidnuncs in 
l)oth hemispheres. . . How . . this most invo- 
lute of lies is finally winded off to the scandalous- 
ridiculous cinder-heart ol it let others relate." 

Count Cagliostro, Arch Quack, etc., year of Lucifer, 
5789, adiiresses his brethren as "Fellow Scondrels, 
. . gathered from the four winds . . as Conquer- 
ors of the Diamond Necklace. [Worth some $400,000.] 
As a public speaker, tlie spirit of masonry, of phi- 
losophy, philanthropy . . . impels to do it. Give 
ear, fellow scoundrels, to what the spirit utters: 
treasure it in your hearts; practice it in your lives. 
Sitting in this central cloaca of nature . . a heart 
into which from all regions, mysterious conduits in- 
troduce and forcibly inject whatsoever is choicest in 

the scoundrelism of the earth But the 

grand problem, fellow scoundrels, as you well know, 
is the marrying of Truth and Sham so that they be- 
come one flesh, man and wife, and generate these 
three: Profit, Pudding, and Respectability that al- 
ways keeps her gig. 

"Brethren, I said the old Christian sect was hap- 
pily extinct. As indeed in Rome there goes the 
wonderfulest traditionary prophecy of that Nazarite 
Christ coming back and being crucified a second time 
there, which I see not in the least how he could fail 
to be . . (From) 'Christian whim' (persons) 'keep 
yourselves forever far.' 

"But neither are we, fellow-scoundrels, without 
our Religion, our Worship, which like all true wor- 
ship is one of fear. . . The cross . . the crescent. 
. . Have we not our gallows? Yes, infinitely ter- 
rible is the gallows: it bestrides with its patibulary 
fork the pit of bottomless Terror. . . Our god is 
one. Great, exceedingly great, is the gallows. . . 
. 0, when with its long black arm it has clutched 
a man, what avails terrestrial things. . . . The 
ill-starred scoundrel pendulates between heaven and 
earth, rejected of both. 

"Blow iSpirit of Egyptian Masonry, blow aside the 
thick curtains of space! . . . Fire, wild billow- 
ing, enwraps the world. . . . Thrones, and Du- 
bois Nitres, and prebendal stalls, . . and all the 
gigs of creation . . a king, a queen, Iscariot Legal- 
ite . . five millions of mutually destroying men. 
For it is the end of the dominion of imposture: . . 
a foulest Circe undertook to fatten thee, and thou 
hadst to fill thy belly with the east wind, and burst? 
V,Y THE Masonry of Enoch, No! . . , The 
red fire sea shall not consume thee. . . But, ha! 
(3 horror of horrors! Is it not myself I see? Ro- 
man Inqusition! . . . These Pinchbeck lips 
can lie no more!" 

The close may foreshadow another overturn of so- 
ciety when<S'Mc7t "fellow-scoundrels"again control the 
government and social life of its officers. Let us 
watch against the causes of such catastrophy as the 
French Revolution record. "The conquerors, every 



October 22, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSUBE. 



one that trafficked (in the Necklace) have they not all 
had their due, which was death?" 

"Wise men boded earthquakes" as Goethe did, as 
our Abolitionists did, as our Anti-lodge men are do- 
ing. Shall our nation heed the warnings? T. H. 



SUN WORSHIP AND THE THIRD DEGREE 
TRAGEDY. 



The sun is released from the grave of winter, and 
fioally restored to life and power by the vernal signs 
of the zodiac, or in other words, by April, May and 
June, aided b}- July. 

Our ancient brethren observed that after the sun 
reached his lowest southern declination, and seemed 
to be slain, yet a few moments of time were added 
to the days, which they regarded as the birth of the 
sun or the new year, hence this became a great solar 
festival, and was enjoyed by them with the assur- 
ance that seed time and harvest would again glad- 
den their hearts, and that the evil spirit of darkness 
that had slain the sun-god was now powerless to do 
further harm. 

Christmas, the real birth of the new j'ear, or the 
sun was apparent when the days began to lengthen, 
but the powers of darkness, spite the lengthening 
days, seemingly held the sun in its grasp through 
the winter months, but when the sun arrives at the 
vernal equinox and the evfrgreni is seen, he gives 
unequivocal tokens of a return to life and power. 
He greatl}' revives in light and heat in April and 
May, and the days rapidly lengthen, but he does not 
attain the summit of the zodiacal arch, until the 
summer solstice in June; nor does he regain all of 
his energy and power until he enters July, which, at 
the summer solstice, is in the constellation of Leo, 
the Lion. 

When the sun arrives at the summer solstice in 
June, the constellation of Leo is seen a few degrees 
in advance, appearing to lead the way and to aid by 
his powerful paw (the strong grip of the lion's paw) 
in lifting the sun up to the summit of the zodiacal 
arch. April and May are therefore said to fail in 
their attempt to raise the sun, for he is hardly out 
of the cold grasp of winter. 

But June Succeeds by the aid of July, and the 
sun is elevated to his place of power and glor3-, and 
reigns through the summer and harvest. 

Soon after leaving the "summit" the days begin 
to shorten as the sun declines toward the autumnal 
equinox, to be again slain by the three autumnal 
months, lie dead through the winter, and be "raised" 
again by the vernal months of spring. Each year 
the sublime tragedy is repeated, and the glorious 
resurrection takes place. — From the Freemason, De- 
troit. 



CLUBISM AND CHRISTIANITY. 



"In a sermon on the 'Modern Migrations of Na- 
tions,' by the late Rev. C. T. Collins, attention is 
called to the fact of the great multiplication of se- 
cret organizations in our modern American society. 
In Cleveland, for example, it is stated that 'there are 
one hundred and fifty-nine churches, synagogues, 
chapels and missions, and two hundred and eighty- 
three of what are practicaily secret societies, of suffi- 
cient importance for the directory.' 

"The Vermont Chronicle adds: 'This condition of 
things, which prevails more or less everywhere, is 
worth}' of serious attention in connection with the 
question of the reactionary infiuences of such socie- 
ties, or any of them, upon the Christian church. Is 
it a sufficient reason in the case of Christian people 
for establishing or joining a new society that its 
moral aim is worth}', or its associations harmless? 
Is there not danger that when Christian men or 
women throw their energy into these orgunizatiuns 
it will be at the expense of the pecuniary ability of 
the church, and the interest and devotion which that 
properly calls for from its members? We by no 
means take the ground that the church is the exclu- 
sive form of associations for benevolent, or social, 
or reformatory purposes, which is opened to Chris 
tian people. But we have a right to judge of other 
forms of association by their fruits. And in so far 
as these |,end to weaken the church, or lessen the de- 
votion to it, their influence is to be deplored. 

" 'The family, the state, and the church are the 
three divinely ordained centres for the crystaliza- 
tion of human society in its different relations, and 
whatever interferes with the arrangement of society 
about these interferes with its healthful order. No 
society has a right, on Christian principles, to live, 
which is a rival to the church. It can claim Chris- 
tian support only when its work and influence are 
auxiliary to the attainment of the objects for which 
the church exists — at the most, when its influence is 
not detrimental to the church.' " 

To this we may add that many churches are vir- 



tually "secret societies," and are managed upon the 
principle of secretism. A few men control and rule 
the church, and half the members do not know what 
they are doing nor why they do it. Of course meet- 
ings for worship are thrown open to the public, but 
when church members meet as such, outsiders are 
excluded. 

But it may be said that they are excluded because 
they are not Christians; but such is not the fact. 
Let a Methodist Christian attempt to enter a Baptist 
church meeting, or let a Presbyterian Christian in- 
sist that he has a right to enter a Methodist Quar- 
terly Conference, or an Episcopal Christian try to 
enter a Presbyterian Session, and it will not take 
him long to learn that he does not belong to that 
secret society. 

Great as is the mischief done by secret societies 
to the church, which is thereby undermined and 
sapped of its strength and power, yet a much great- 
er mischief is done to the cause of God by unscrip 
tural and unchristian divisions which separate the 
people of God from each other, and exclude true 
Christians from the privileges of the heavenly 
Father's family. A man who becomes a Freemason 
is a Freemason everywhere. Wherever he can find 
a "lodge" he has a right to enter in. But a Chris- 
tian entitled to all the privileges of the church on 
one side of the way, has only to cross the street to 
find another church where he has neither right, nor 
lot, nor part, nor privilege. A man may be a min- 
ister of the Gospel on one side of the way, accepted, 
honored, useful, and yet across the street he may gf) 
and come for years and never be recognized in his 
character as a servant of the Lord, because he does 
not belong to the religious secret society which as- 
seml)les there. And this is simply because men 
have divided and scattered the flock of God, and are 
using their best endeavors to perpetuate those divis- 
ions and keep asunder those for whorn the Saviour 
prayed that they might all be one. 

Surely the presence of a multitude of secret com- 
binations bodes little good to the church of Christ; 
especially when secret combinations are counte- 
nanced by ministers, fostered by church members, 
and used to supplant the church of Christ in its le- 
gitimate work. But more disheartening and hurt- 
ful by far are the sectarian divisions by which the 
people of God scatter their forces, weaken their in- 
fluence, consume their strength and waste their 
means, until they become the song of the drunkard 
and the scofl'of the godless and the profane. '-Holy 
Father, keep through thine own name those whom 
thou hast given me, that they may be ome, as we 
are.' — The Armory. 



AN EXAMPLE OF MANLY INDEPENDENCE. 



No one can read John Quincy Adams's fearless and 
eloquent letters against Freemasonry without mark- 
ing the character described in the following from 
Zions Herald: 

While yet a young man of uncertain prospects, 
John Quincy Adams said, ''With an ordinary share 
of common sense which I hope I enjoy, I can live 
independent and free; and rather than live otherwise, 
I would wish to die before the time when I shall be 
left to my ov/n discretion." This manly utterance 
was the key-note to the remarkable career of Mr. 
Adams. To be free from dependence on the favor 
of individuals and parties, to be independent in his 
judgments and opinions, and to act as his conscience 
dictated, was the height of his ambition. He had 
the courage of this high ambition, and therefore he 
served his generation usefully and honorably. Young 
men in these days of place hunting will do well to 
shrink, as he did, from voluntary dependence on the 
capricious favors of men in power, and from slavish 
I bondage to the opinions of other men. To be loyally 
I free and wisely independent, gives strength and dig- 
, nity to character. 

The Beta Theta Pi College fraternity at its annual 
I meeting on August 'llt\x at the Lindell Hotel, this 
I city, was presided over by B. Gratz Brown and its 
' patron god Wooglin. We recommend such societies 
to all parents who send their sons and daughters to 
; college, as the best organizations for lavish expendi- 
j ture of money, doubtful moral and religious incul- 
cations, and fruitful places to teach non-self-reliance, 
bumptiousness and frivolity. — The Midland. 

A delegation of Pueblo Indians, from New 
Mexico were the other day in Washington protest- 
ing against the recent decision which defines them 
to be citizens of the United States. The decision is 
based upon the fact that before the Gadsden treaty 
of 1849 they were citizens of Mexico, and by that 
treaty were entitled to the privilege of citizenship 
in the United States. They do not want to vote 
and they do not want to pay taxes, and came on to ^ 
state their objections to the new administration. 



THE SECRET EMPIRE- 



CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE OCCUR- 
RENCES IN MASONRY. 



MASONRY SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. 



[From Hardie's Monitor, Edition of 1818.J 

Before Christ 3875. Cain and his adherents, hav- 
ing been instructed in the sciences of geometry and 
architecture, by the first mason Adam, built a citv, 
which he called Enoch, after the name of his oldest 
son. 

The posterity of Cain, Jabel, Jubal, and Tubal- 
Cain, not only improved in Masonry and geometry, 
but made discoveries in several other useful arts 
See Genesis 4: 17, 20, 21, 22. 

2348. The ark, in which Noah p,nd his three sons, 
Shem, Ham, Japhet, all true masons, were preserved, 
built. 

2217. Nimrod, the grandson of Ham, and the 
founder of the Bab} Ionian monarchy, built many 
cities in Shinaar. 

2188. Metzaim or Menes, the second son of Ham, 
carried to Egypt his skill in the masonic art, in con- 
sequence of which, many great cities, as Memphis, 
Heliopolis, Thebes, &c., besides their famous pyra- 
mids, and many other magnificient edifices, were af- 
terwards built. 

1920. The masonic and other arts, which flour- 
ished amongst the Chaldeans, carried out of Chaldea 
and Assyria, to the Egyptains, by Abraham. 

1252. The city of Tyre built, by a great body of 
Sidonian masons from Gabala, under their grand 
master and his wardens. 

1117. The PhfEnicians built the famous temple 
of Dagon at Gaza, which was afterwards pulled down 
liy Samson, when 3U00 of the Philistiau chiefs were 
slain. 

1056. Hiram, king of Tyre, as grand master, took 
upon himself the direction of the craft, erected many 
new cities and stately edifices in his dominions, and 
joined the city of Tyre to the temple of Jupiter 
Olympus, situate on an island. 

941. Dresiphou and- Archiphron, who had ac- 
quired the masonic art from some of those employed 
in the erection of Solomon's temple, superintended 
the building of the celebrated temple of Diana at 
Ephesus. 

747. Nabonassar, called also Baladau, was an ex- 
cellent architect, aud greatly encouraged the craft, 
particularly in employing them in building the fa- 
mous city of Babylon. 

570. The walls of Babylon, the temple of Belus, 
a golden image in the plains of Dora, which was 80 
cubits high, and 6 broad, and in value about four- 
teen millions of dollars, together with many other 
stately edifices, were built under the direction of Ne- 
buchadnezzar, grand master. 

536. Cyrus, founder of the Persian empire, ap- 
pointed as grand master, for the rebuildino- of the 
temple at Jerusalem, Zerubabel, under the title of 
Tirshatha. 

520. Zoroastes, grand master of the Magi, in Per- 
sia, and his disciples, made great progress in geome- 
try and the liberal arts, and erected many splendid 
palaces and temples in the empire. 

516. Pythagoras, "a native of Greece, traveled in- 
to Egypt and other countries, in which he continued 
about twenty years, and having acquired the knowl- 
edge of geometry aud other sciences, on his return, 
instituted a lodge of free-masons. 

408. Sanballet, the Horonite, appointed by Dari- 
us Nothus, as grand master, to superintend the 
building of a splendid temple on mount Gerizim, near 
Samariti. 

353. Mausolus, king of Caria in Lesser Asia, hav- 
ing died, his wife caused a stupendous monument 
of 140 feet in height, surrounded by 136 columns of 
most admirable sculpture, to be erected to his mem- 
ory. 

332. Democrates, an eminent architect, with a 
view to encourage the fraternity, prevailed on Alex- 
ander the Great, to build a famous city in Egypt, to 
which he gave the name of Alexandria. 

304. Masonry grealty flourished in Egypt, under 
Ptolemy Soter, at which period Euclid, the celebrated 
geometrician from Tyre, was one of the most distin- 
guished members of the lodge. 

55. Julius Ciesar, the grand master of the Roman 
empire, patronized masonry, not only in his own do- 
minions, but likewise in Great Britain, after he had 
landed in that country. 

37. King Herod, an excellent grand master, sent 
for the most expert masons from Greece, who with 
his own masons, built a splendid Grecian temple at 
Jerusalem, rebuilt Samaria, to which he gave the 
name of Sebaste, built the cities Antipatris, Phasiti, 
aud Cypron, and the admirable tower of Phasasl at 
Jerusalem. 



--•T 



■*-■ 



THS CHEISTIA^ OYlf OStTBU. 



October 22, 1886 



29. The emperor Augustus eneoimigod the erat't 
more than any of his predet-essoi-s. Under him and 
his prinoipjil warden the learned Mtnivius, the pan- 
theon, the bridge of Arminium. the great forum, sev- 
exal temples, and a number of stately public edifices 
were constructed. 

Jesus Christ, our blessed Saviour, the Great Archi- 
tect of the Church, was born at Bethlehem in Judea. 
in the 4th year before the vulgar Christian ;vra. aud 
in the year of masonry 4000. 

After Christ 70. The emperor Xero. though an 
execrable tvrant. greatly patronized the fraternity. 

S4. Upon the return of Titus from the overthrow 
of the Jewish nation, he employed the craft iu build- 
ing a triumphal arch, adorned with splendid engrav- 
ings and sculpture, and a noble palace with the fa- 
mous stutue of Lacoon of one stone. 

114. The emperor Trajan, by his warden, the re- 
nowned architec-t AppolcKiorus, constructed a won- 
derful bridge across the Danube, and built a noble 
circus, and several other edifices of stupendous mag- 
nitude at Eome. 

130. Adrian, the Koman emperor, who was an 
operative, as well as a speculative mason, built the 
Koman wall, near the borders between England aud 
Scotland, a commodious bridge at Kome, his famous 
mausoleum. i.V:c. 

1717. In the beginning of^ the seventeenth cen- 
turv, the annual assembly of the grand lodge, had 
not", for some years, been duly attended, owing to 
the bodily infirmities of Sir Christopher Wren; but 
upon his" death Mr. Sayer was elected and masonry 
revived. 

1719. A great addition to the number of free- 
masons takes place in England, after the election of 
Dr. Desaguliers to the office of grand master. 

172u. A. number of valuable manuscripts, con- 
cerning lodges, particularly one written by Nicholas 
Stone.Varden under luigo Jones, destroyed by some 
too scrupulous brethren. 

1 723. The book of constitutions of the freema- 
sons, containing the history, charges, and regula- 
tions of that most ancient and worshipful fraternity, 
bv James Anderson, published under the sanction of 
the grand lodge. 

The Duke of Buecleugh, then grand master of 
England, proposed a scheme for raising a general 
fund for the permanent relief of distressed masons 
and their families, which was readily adopted. 

172i3. The brethren of "Wales, who had formerly 
been independent, unite under the banners of the 
grand Lodge of London. 

1735. The States General of Holland published 
an edict, prohibiting the meeting of free-masons ij 
their territories. 

1737. A similar decree ordained by the French 
crovemment. 

15th Nov. Frederick, prince of Wales, father of 
George IIL, king of Great Britain, initiated in Lon- 
don. 

1738. 15th August, Frederick, afterwards denom- 
inated the Great, king of Prussia, admitted as a mem- 
ber in a lodge at Brunswick. 

1739. Free-masons prohibited from meeting in 
the papal teiTitorics, under pain of excommunica- 
tion and other severe penalties, by pope Clement XII. 

1740. A grand lodge established at Berlin, by 
Frederick the Great, on his accession to the throne. 

1745 3d March, by a decree of the republic of 
Berne, he who frequented a masonic assemblj' was 
to par a fine of one hundred crowns. 

1754. Certain brethren, who assembled without 
anv lesal authority, under the denomination of an- 
cient msLHtbTS. expelled. 

1755. October 7th. the marquis of Carnarvon, as 
grand master, granted more provincial patents than 
anv of his predecessors. He, in particular, granted 
a deputation for all the king's dominions in Ger- 
manv. with power to choose their successors. 

17C2. Provincial patents issued for Jamaica, Ar- 
menia. Westphalia. Bombay, Brunswick, and many 
islands in the West Indes. 

1765. Their royal highnesses the dukes of Glou- 
cester and Cumberland, initiated. 

17GS. Januarv, two letters received from the 



17S0. A representative of the grand lodge of 
Germany, received with distiuguished honor, by the 
grand lodge of Eugland; and the most intimate 
union agreed on between the grand lodges of the 
two countries. 

1790. His royal highness prince Edward, now 
duke of Kent, initiated in the Union lodge, of Gene- 
va, aud his brother prince Augustus Fretlerick made 
a mason at Berlin. 

24th November, in eousequence of the death of the 
duke of Cumberland, the prince of Wales appointed 
grand master of Eugland, in his stead. 

1793. 6th February, the grand lodge of Eugland, 
present to the king, by their grand master, an ad- 
dress, expressive of their attachment to order, sub- 
ordination aud good government, 

24th September, Gustavus, the late king of Swed- 
en, initiated into the order, at the grand lodge of 
Stockholm, under the auspices of his uncle, the pres- 
ent king, who presided as grand master. 

25th November, the prince of Wales, as grand 
master, laid the first stone of the new chapel at 
Brigthelmstone. 

179S. July 12, Act of parliament passed for the 
suppression of seditious societies in Great Britain, 
but the free-mason's are exempted from its penalties, 

1808. Foundation stone of Covent Garden Thea- 
tre laid by the prince of Wales as grand master, at- 
tended by the grand lodge. 

1813. His royal highness, the duke of Sussex 
elected grand master, on the resignation of the prince 
of Wales, who assumed the title of grand patron. 



that seut help back to the poor saints in Jerusalem. 
To some this will look like going backward. Yet it 
is the quickest way to the conquest of the world for 
Jesus. Years to come will demonstrate this." 



RETVRNIKO TO THE OLD WATS. 



ADDRESS TO THE VOTERS OF THE AMERI- 
CAN PARTY IN THE STATE OF IOWA. 



PREPARED BY ORDER OF THE STATE CONVENTION AT 
WEST BRANCH. 



Bro. C. B. Ward, editor of the Imlla Mttliodist 
Watchmnn, Secunderabad, Deccan, India, writes to 
the Missionary Review: 

Surely the greatest need of the world is self- 
supporting, self-propagating Christianity. All socie- 
ties and missionaries avow thig and stoutlj' affirm 
that this is the aim of all their efforts. Merchants 
and speculators are wise enough in planting indus- 
tries, trade and railways in the nations of the earth, 
even in the heathen nations, to establish them in a 
manner and on a financial basis within the resourc- 
es of the country entered. But missionar_y enter- 
prise has been less wise generally. Christianity to 
become self -supporting and self-propagating in In- 
dia, or any other countrj', must be begun and run 
on a practical basis. All agree that the means and 
agencies for the ultimate capturing for God of 
heathen lands are in those lands befoi-e the mission- 
ary comes. It is then necessary to operate on a 
basis within the possibilities of those indigenous 
means and practicable to the indigenous agencies. 
"From Governmenf statistics we learn that 'four- 
fifths of India's 250 millions belong to the agricul 
ral class; 190 millions of the 250 have an annual 
income per head of $10 to $4.' The Gospel has its 
way to win among the '190 millions.' Is the mis- 
sionary enterprise set on foot in India, within the 
possibilities of the resources of these millions and 
thus practicable to indigenous agents or agency? 

"We think but one answer is possible. We note 
first, with few exceptions, and they are not popular, 
that missionaries have come to India with their 
home, or occidental ideas of work, of building and 
of finance. The school buildings, mission houses, 
church buildings, methods of work, cost of admin- 
istration, are far more occidental than oriental, and 
wholly and utterly beyond the means of the people 
to support or perpetuate. The natives see this and 
cannot by any means be persuaded to attempt either 
the support or propagation of an occidental Christi- 
anity'. On the contrary, the inauguration they have 
witnessed suggests to them that the agents who thus 
inaugurate are within reach of stores sufficient for 
keeping up this style of things, aud it is further 
suggested to them that there may be enough to spare 
to warrent their drawing on the 'meal barrel' The 
sight of grandly equipped missionaries with plenty 
of money, grand houses, ten to fifty thousand rupee 
chapels and churches, stately colleges, seminaries, 
. high schools, and thousands of common ones, with 
grand lodge of France, expressing a desire to open I ^n army of well paid teachers, hundreds of whom 
a regular correspondence with the grand lodge of L^e unconverted heathen,— all convey an idea to the 
England. The request was readily agreed to, and a ordinary native which stifles every generous instinct, 
book of constitutions, a list of the lodges under the } ^nd either he concludes nothing is needed or that he 
jurisdiction of the English grand lodge, with the may get something from this apparent plenty. *** 



It may be asked, what would we do? We an 
swer, just what the Apostles did: 'Preach the Gos- 
pel!' Leave all the western trappings at home. 
Preach the pure Holy Ghost Gospel in India, and 



form a deputation, &c., elegantl}- bound, ordered to 
be sent as a present. 

1777. Free-Mason's Calendar, first ordered to be 
printed, by authority of the grand lodge of England. 

1779. His highness Omditul Omrah Bahauder, ; let it take shape in India, China, Japan, and Africa, 
eldest son of the nabob of the Carnatic, was initiated ' without sin, but in the costumes of the countries 
into the masonic order, in the lodge at Trinchinopoly, respectively. Our day finds the v/orld in a much 
near Madras, and expressed the highest veneration better state for this order of things than when the 
for the institution. Apostles planted Christian churches in heathendom. 



You are again besieged by frantic appeals for help 
from pretended reformers to vote for some indvidual 
or individuals to save some cause which is threat- 
ened with ruin. In the midst of the din and excite- 
ment on the eve of the election your attention is 
called to a few calm words on the real questions of 
the hour. 

It is not the tariff, for what effect can the choice 
of a county or State officer have on that issue? Ex- 
cept that the choice of the members of the State 
Legislature involves indirectly the choice of a Unit- 
ed "States Senator. 

It is in a measure prohibition, for all the parties 
have spoken publicly in their platforms on this 
question. The Democratic party has uttered its 
voice for license; the amount of the license is not of 
importance. The Greenback part}', in fusing, has 
adopted the same principle. The Republican party 
has adopted prohibition "in obedience to the will of 
the people," but it is not to be a test of party fealty. 
We might be inclined to wonder why this distinction 
was made; but we see that party has honored the 
whisky men in its convention and on its ticket. 
Translated into plain English the platform means, 
we are compelled to submit to it much against our 
will, but we bow to the will of the majority, and 
therefore enact prohibition. 

But while the enactment of the law was a grand 
success, the execution has been a complete farce. 
Men in office, who have sworn to execute the law, 
make the excuse for non-execution that it is unpop- 
ular, and then coolly inform the people who elected 
them to execute the law, that the people have the 
law and now they ought to see that it is enforced. 

The American partj' of Iowa, at its State conven- 
tion at West Branch, Aug. 27, 1885, resolved to 
make no nominations, but to select suitable men 
from the nominees of the other parties, and this 
choice was left to the judgment of the executive 
committee. 

The Prohibition party of this State, at its conven- 
tion at Cedar Rapids, so far respected our conscien- 
tious convictions as to nominate men not only un- 
objectionable, but very acceptable to the executive 
committee. These men, whose names you will find 
in the Free Press, are in everj' way worthy of your 
suffrages. The American party has not lost its or- 
ganization, nor united with the Prohibition party 
permanently.,^ But during this campaign let us sup- 
port and vote for the same ticket in the hope that 
they will be able to work harmoniously together in 
the future. 

But let not the members of the American party 
be deceived by the secret orders, even such as are 
professedly formed for laudable ends. Eternal vig- 
ilance is the price of liberty. Let them watch all 
the contests closely and with a firm trust in God, 
who overrules the actions of men for his own wise 
purposes, let them cast their ballots in such a man- 
ner as will defeat the plans of the men who plot in 
the dark and hidden recesses of the lodge. Let us 
remember all the injustice and rascality that goes 
unpunished. Let us do right under all circum- 
stances. Cherishing no personal animosities toward 
those who differ from us, earnestly desirous that the 
slaves of the secret empire may be freed from their 
thralldom, with malice toward none, with charity 
toward all, animated by a high, noble, chivalrous 
purpose, let us go forward, bearing our testimony 
against the evils that threaten the very existence 
of our free institutions. We look not for victory 
this year; we have no hope for it next yeai'. But 
wo know that our humble efforts now are the seed of 
the future triumph. In the morning, then, "let us 
sow our seed, and in the evening withhold not our 
hand, for we know not whether shall prosper either 
this or that." Our Father in heaven who sends the rain 
and the sunshine, who gives the increase to our 
planting and watering, who turns the hearts of the 
children of men as the rivers of water are turned, 
will in his own time and way bring the glorious and 
abundant harvest. While it is true that every little 
I movement does not develop into a mighty one, yet 
it is likewise true that every great movement among 
men has started from a small source. The great 
movements of the world have had very humble and 
unpropitious beginnings, and very few could foresee 
the grand results which time developed. A little 
band of heroes agitated the slavery question, and a 



October 22, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



great party to-day lives and flourishes on the deeds sion on the part of the N. C. A. not to heartily co- 
and glory of those men. Brothers, be true to your , operate in the movement, sustaining it with means 



principles, and God will be true to you. 

George Warrington, Chairman of Committee. 



FINANCIAL. 



,nd whatever influence it might give to aid in se- 
curing a result so greatly desired hj every true 
friend of the reform against the secret system. If 
you are a friend what can you do and how much 
will 3'ou give to help on the work? 

J. P. Stoddard. 



Friends of the Reform: — Contributions in aid of 

the National Christian Association's work have been \ -^^-^ 

secured by personal solicitation, but no general ap- ' LITER A TUBE. 

peal has appeared in your organ since the Washing- ' 

ton purchase was completed. It seems now to be i Between Two Opinions. — A portion of the first 
pioper to state that funds are needed for the follow- \ edition of our new book, "latest and best," is prom- 
ing reasons: ! ised from the bindery next week, handsomely bound 

1. And in general. The subscription list of the in cloth; price one dollar. Get the book for fireside 
Christian Cynosure, sales of publications and field reading as the evenings grow longer. No story has 
collections in connection with lectures have felt the lately issued from the press more clmste in senti- 
pressure of close times and have sufl"ered in common ; ment, more true to fact, more fearless in assailing en- 
with the general business interests of the country. ; trenched and popular evils. It is emphatically a 

2. The field has been providentially and greatly , book for home reading and fireside discussion. 

enlarged and is constantly becoming more education- \ ^ „ , r , , , • , 

1 1 1- • • -4. I i fTu,„ „„„ „<- „ .„j-„™ ' The Essays of Elia, by Cbarles Lamb, with an introduc- 

al and religious in its character. The secret system ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^i^,^^^ \>^hm. Price, cloth and gilt, .50 cents. 

has developed more rapidly, and is more thoroughly John B. Alden, New York. 

matured in the Southern than in the Northern States, ' Charles Lamb, though he spent the tnirty-three 
where its ripe fruits ippear. Men of penetration best years of his life as clerk in the India oflice in 
who have applied their minds to the investigation of London, yet was an intimate friend and companion 
the system and noted its workings with care, have of Coleridge, Wordsworth, Hunt, and Hazlitt, and 
reached the conclusion that the ultimate issue is to engaged in a number of literary ventures. His po- 
be between the church and the lodge, and between ' etiy and dramatic writings have been long since for- 
free government and a secret despotism. This fact gotten, and like the author of Pilgrim's Progress and 
is now being demonstrated in a way to convince '' Boliinson Cruso he is best known by one book — this 
many who were once incredulous, by the night raids j volume of quaint, graceful essays full of the tender- 
on Countee and other ministers of the Gospel, whose '. derest humor and charming old-fashioned sentences, 
only ofl'ense was leaving and speaking against what! which remind the reader as much of his familiarity 
they saw to be a wicked and dangerous conspiracy. ' with the old dramatists of the age of Elizabeth, as 
These men are "suflering persecution" for Christ's ' of the family misfortunes of Lamb himself. He 
sake, having sacrificed position and support for the : never married, but devoted himself unselfishly to 
truth, and they are looking to the N. C. A. for sym- 1 the care and support of an only sister, who in a 
pathy and support. To forsake these brethren in an ' sudden fit of insanity stabbed her own mother at 
hour of such peril would be both cruel and wicked. ; the dinner table. With this sister he wrote the well 
The little done in this field by the N. C. A. has al- ! known "Tales from the Plays of Shakespeare," and 
ready produced marked and encouraging results, and ; some of his critical papers are considered among the 
with the hearty co-operation of Dr. Roy and the sym- 1 finest in the language. "There are books," says a 
pathy of the secretaries of the American Missionary | writer, "which one reads once in his life time, per- 
As.iOciation,and its agents and of Rev. H. Wood- haps twice, or may be three times, and then has no 
small and others, there is great encouragement to in- i more to do with them. Quite otherwise is it with 
vest labor and means with every prospect of early i Elia. One takes him up at forty as cheerily as he 
and large results. did at twenty; and at sixty, or may be seventy or 

3. Another opening is among the population who | eighty, as cheerily as he did at twentj'. Elia is in 
have recently come to our countrj^ from foreign i fact what Keats dreamed of but never came to real- 
lands. The Swedish people are as a rule accessible i ize: '■A joy forever.'" Mr. Alden presents these es- 
and ready to give us an impartial hearing. The : says of EJia in the very best form for the reader. 
Welsh and Holland people are by conviction and j Tliere are, all told, tweutj'-eight of them, and they 
constitution favorable to open and fair methods and • fill a little volume of apout 240 pages, just the size 
many of the ecclesiastical bodies with which these : and shape to be held in the hand and read easily 
and the more pious among our German citizens are j and with pleasure. Prefixed to this volume is a 
connected are averse to secret societies. The Angus- j clever introduction by Mr. Alfred Ainger, which 
tana Synod of North America with its theological | leaves little to be desired in its way of criticism, 
seminaries, colleges, academies, churches and schools j ^^^ ^. ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ j^ ^ biographical number, 

for primary instruction are accessible and eager for | ^ _^^^ of Samuel Bowles, well known as one of 

tne light. A number of influential ecclesiastica i ^^^t ^^^^^^.^ ^^,.^^,,^ ^^ ^j^^ ^^^^ 1^ j^ j^.^ ^^^.^ 

bodies among the Germans, close their doors agains ; .^ ^^^ gp.tngfield RcprAKcan, is accompanied by an 
the night lodges and are ready to co-operate as fast : ^ 4 g-^^,^ in Independent Journalism," bv 

and as far as they are mformed This work among (. ^ g. Merri^m. "The Last Days of General 
the people of foreign birth like that in the South wi 1 ; .^^^^- ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ,,-^.^^^^1^ ^^^^^ ^, ^.^^^„ 

be for a time largely in the nature of mission efl:ort, s ^^^ ^^^ jj^..^^^ p^^.^^^.. a^eminiscences of General 

Grant" by Gen. James H. Wilson, are timely sketch- 
es of the great commander which are a valuable con- 



sustained chiefiy by those who have the cause ati^^^.^^,', 



heart. When informed and aroused these people 
will not be surpassed in their practical opposition to 
lodge power in church and state, but they must be 
enlisted before taking place in the front ranks of the 
conflict 

sive, but once in possession of the facts and ninety 
and nine out of every hundred will step into the 
front rank of aggressive movements. 



tribution to the popular information, though the 

newspaper press seemed to exhaust the subject. In 

„, - ^- 1 1 4-11* General Porter's article is quoted a sentence from 

They are now acting lai-gely on tiie dejen- 1 g^,^^^,^ response to President Lincoln whencommis- 

sioned lieutenant-general, in which he says that if 
the responsibilities that weigh upon him are met it 
will be "above all to the Providence which leads 
both nations and men." Such an acknowledgement 



This is not a fickle, fluctuating class who act has 
tily and then go back on the record, but every step ^f Divine power at the time gives us a bright view 
in advance with them means a permanent gain to the ^f ^j^g inmost heart of the man. The finely illus- 
working force in the cause. | trated articles are "The Great River of Alaska," 

4. Indications are highly favorable to a "Christian juThe Summer Haunts of American Artists," "Tus- 
conference" of leading men in evangelical churches , ^^^ Cities" and "Riverside Park." 
in this countrv, to discuss the eflfect of the secret , .. u ^r- 7 7 w ^-i 

svstem on the" evangelization of the masses, and the j The current number of St. Nicholas comp etes the 
administration of civil government, and to advise I twelfth volume of this entertaining and richly illus- 
what measures are necessary to "save the church of \ trated monthly for young^ readers 
Christ from being depraved and disintegrated, to re 



deem the administration of justice from perversion 
and our republican government from corruption." 

Not a few "watchmen on the wall" and guardians 
of the public safety are alarmed at the wanton dese- 
cration of sacred things, and the indiflerence or in- 
ability of civil magistrates to protect the innocent 
and punish the guilty, and knowing the strength there 
is in unity they are beginning seriously to consider 
the necessity of conference in council and concert in 
effort to rid the church and nation of a common 
enemy alike to society, the state and the church. If, 
as now seems probable, these men should decide to 
hold such a conference, it would be a serious omis- 



We almost re- 
gret the conclusion of E. P. Roe's "Driven back to 
Eden," which is a very instructive history of the first 
season of country life enjoyed l\y a family reared in 
the city. The story of every day work and pleasure 
is charmingly told. "Among the Lawmakers" yet 
continues the experiences of a page in the Senate 
Chamber. The philosophy and beauty of Greek 
architecture is told in "Those Clever Greeks," and 
some things valuable in natural history are written 
in "Honey-hunters" and "War with the little Red- 
skins;" while every little girl will be fascinated with 
"Peggy s Garden." 

The North American Revieio began a series of war 
articles in its October number, with a review of the 



contributions of McClellan and Fitz John Porter in 
the Century, on the Seven Days' Battles before Rich- 
mond and the changes of base to the James river. 
Both threw the blame for McClellan's failure upon 
the authorities at Washington, but their reviewer 
shows from their own statements that this is but a 
deception, and that McClellan must himself bear the 
blame. The Review proposes to follow this article 
with a war series by General Beauregard, who will 
write four articles on "The Shiloh Campaign," "The 
Defense of Charleston," "The Drury Bias's Cam- 
paign and The Defense of Petersburg." The}' will 
Ijegin in the January number of the Review. 

General Grant's paper on, Chattanooga will be 
printed in the November Century. It takes up the 
writer's military career at Vicksburg, and fol- 
lows the campaign of Chattanooga from the 
beginning of his connection with it. The motives 
and conduct of the campaign are said to be set be- 
fore the reader fully and clearly, and with much 
personal interest. I3is Wilderness article, which is 
to follow soon, is a description of the preparations 
made for the Wilderness campaign, by which Gener- 
al Grant meant the movement of all the Union armies 
begun in May, 1864. 

George W. Clark, the veteran speaker and song- 
ster, of Detroit, will have out in a week or two "The 
Songs for the Times," which will doubtless prove the 
popular Prohibition and reform song book of Michi- 
gan. It will cost about 30 cents. We bespeak for it 
an immediate as well as hearty welcome. — The ten- 
ter. 

It is announced upon authority that Mr. Kasson, 
of Iowa, has begun the preparation of his long-pro- 
jected work on the diplomatic history of the United 
States during the war. 

A number of letters from Ralph Waldo Emerson 
to Thomas Carlyle have been stolen, and the public 
are cautioned against the purchase of the same. 

Representatives of forty-seven G. A. R. posts of 
N. Y., have issued a circular requesting the black- 
listing of all members of the legislature who have 
not favored such legislation as will give special 
privileges to members of the G. A. R. They think 
they "deserve some shadow of gratitude from our 
State and national governments. We are not dis- 
posed to undervalue the services of the soldiers in 
the late war, but if any class of men ever received 
recognition, gratitude and compensation, it is those 
who served in the army for the suppression of the 
rebellion. A secret conspiracy to blacklist honest 
legislators who vote as they think will not materially 
help the men that are engaged in it, and if the G. 
A. R. is lending itself to such purposes it will soon 
cease to have the respect of all fair-minded citizens. 
— American. 

— Mr. Moody has had so many and such press- 
ing calls from all over the North, that he has been 
compelled to postpone his promised visit to the South 
until after the first of January. We had hoped he 
would reach some of the more important points ear- 
ly in the winter, and give the winter's work a good 
start. For the cotton States, however, the time for 
the best work is after the holidaj-s. The cotton busi- 
ness absorbing every one during October, Novem- 
ber, and December. But afterthe first of January 
there is lots of time for Christian work; the rainy 
season is nearly over, and till the first of May, the 
choice month of the year, Mr. Moody has promised 
to hold evangelistic meetings in New Orleans, and 
has invitations from the ministers and associations 
at Mobile, Selma, Marion, Nashville, Chattanooga, 
Knoxville and other points. — Y. M. C. A. Watchman. 

— The Romanists tell us in one breath that Cardi- 
nal McCloskey was a good Christian, and we do not 
question it; but they tell us in the next that his soul 
has entered Purga,torj', from which undesirable lo- 
cality it can be liberated by prayers offered to the 
Virgin Mary and to the saints, socalled. This we do 
question, maintaining that it has no warrant in Holy 
Scripture, is a human invention, and makes the sac- 
rifice of Christ of no eifect. Yet the Papal body 
puts crosses on church steeples, on its altars, on the 
robes of its priests, while robbing the cross of its 
meaning and power. — Intelligencer. 

At one of the stations on the Chicago and North- 
western railroad recentlj', an anxious inquirer came 
up to the door of the baggage car and said, "Is 
there anything for me?" After some search among 
boxes and trunks, the baggage master rolled out a 
keg of whisky. "Anything more?" asked the wet 
grocer. "Yes," said the baggage man, "there's a 
gravestone that goes with that liquor." The coun- 
tenance of the whisky man assumed a wrathy but 
thoughtful appearance, the door was shut with a 
slam and the train moved on. — Union Signal. 



\' 



^SKi 



THE CHRIBTIAN CTNOBXI'EM. 



October 22, 1886 



COERESPCNDEIfCE. 



2>'0 SMABISG OFF /-V }yORSHlP. 



Pear Cyxosire: — A oomiuentatov oa Jehu says 
that the Jeroboam woi-sbip at Pan and Bethel "ims 
renlly the icorship of Jihov'.th, though in an iinhiicf'ul 
m.jHHtr, and therefore probably Jehu did not feel the 
same obligation to suppress it as to desti'oy the W(.)r- 
ship of Baal." 

1 don't question the greater diliereuce between the 
worships of Baal and that of Jerusalem, than be- 
tween the calf-worship and that at Jerusalem: but is 
not a forgery by its exact resemblance equally as 
bad and more deceitful than direct opposition to 
truth? Ic seems to me that no "real worship of Je- 
hovah" can exist where God's own law of worship 
is set aside. Such worship as man may invent or 
adopt to promote his own ends, as Jeroboams was, 
cannot l>e any more acceptable to God than any oth- 
er which the devil may suggest or man invent, how- 
ever gross and abominable. 

We are too often met with Masonic sophistries to 
allow such reasoning to pass unchallenged. For if 
the Jerusalem worship could be set aside for that of 
Pan and Bethel, as it was by the ten tribes, so may 
the true worship now be set aside for the inventions 
of Kome or of Mormonism, or even of Freemasou- 
rv. in each of which systems men claim 
to be worshipers of the true God. In reality it is 
less ditticult to convert publicans and harlots and 
have them enter the kingdom of God than such self- 
deluded scribes and pharisees, even as Christ said. 
Because Masonry teaches the resurrection by a 
shameful farce and pretends to worship the Creator 
under the strange name, --Grand Architect of the 
Universe." it is by no means acceptable to God. In 
vain, says Christ, ye worship me, teaching for doc- 
trines the commandments or inventions of men. 
The worship established at Jerusalem was prohibi- 
tion of every other. T. 11. 

THE y C. A. ANB THE CYiWOHURS NEEDED 
IN TEE SOUTH. 



clean from falsehood and trickery, and not be like 
the other political parties. Let us stand with God 
and all will be well. We are gaining ground. I 
hope you will find out whether your informant or 
this preacher tells the ti-uth, and so publish it. 

Paniel Mabee. 



G)BBS Cross-PvOads, Tenn., Oct. 6, 1885. 
I have no language with which I can express my 
thankfulness and appreciation of your favor of Sep- 
tember the 2Sth. I felt that in the loss of the Ci/- 
noxitre I would lose a near and dear friend and wise 
c-ounsellor. 3Jav God. --who doeth all things well," 
abundanly bless the kind friends who send it tome. 
While I have taken great interest in the Cynosure 
since I began to read it two years ago, I am now 
brought under renewed obligations to do all I can 
for it. I read the papers then hand them to others. 
Eternity alone can reveal the good alreadj' accom- 
plished in this country through this means. I have 
been show-ing the danger and inconsistency of Chris- 
tians affiliating with the lodge, by sermons, lectures, 
and. as you already know, have not shunned to use 
my pen for Christ. And though I was the first to 
speak out publicly and to be persecuted, others are 
being awakened. The National Christian Associa- 
tion can scarcely find a better field than this to work 
in. Will not they send a lecturer? May God bless 
vou. W. H. Smith. 



THE GOOD TEMPLARS AND PROHIBITION. 



PITH AND POINT. 



Si'E.N-CER, Tioga Co., N. Y., Oct. 8, 1885. 

Editor CiiEiSTi.iN Cv-N'OSUre: — You say in the 
tynf/iure of the 17th of September that the "Grand 
Lo<^lge of Good Templars of the State of Xew York 
resolved that it was inconsistent for Good Templars 
to sign petitions for saloon licenses, and that three 
hundred members left the lodge on account of that 
vote. The Grand Lodge itself voted against the St. 
John or prohibition party." 

I had a talk with the delegate from the Good 
Templar lodge of this place to the Grand Lodge of 
the State: he says there was no such thing done, or 
vote taken in Grand Lodge at all. He pronounces 
it a deliberate falsehood, and says there was some- 
thing said against signing saloon licenses, but no 
vote taken. He says he was there during the eiltire 
session, and saw and heard ail that was done. 

Likewise you saj' in the (JynoKi/.rt of Oct. 1st that 
the '-Grand Lodge of New York cast a two-third 
vote against the prohibition partj-." He saj's that 
is also a falsehood, and claims the Good Templars 
are in favor of the prohibition party. He is the 
Methfxlist Episcopj.! preacher of this place (Spencer) 
and says he don't know anything about Masonrj', 
and I think he don't want to know. 

I feel deeply interested in the Christian Associa- 
tion, formed against seeretism of all kinds, and in 
favor of the American party and vote that ticket, 
and in favor of prohibition, both State and National. 
I hope as a party we will keep our hearts and hands 



THE NEW BOOK. 

I read with interest ' Between Two Opinions," and 
was gratified with the seutiments expressed, and noticed 
the reference to the Board of Trade, as though nil sin 
was not contained inside of the lodge. The priaciple 
does not stop there, for it is not hard to see some like 
ness to Freemasonry (though not the oaths and silly cer 
eaionios) in nearly every organization, so that wc can 
well nigh say, to some extent every man is a Freemason. 
There is lots of truth contained in the article from the 
Interior by F A. Shaw, "Popularity versus Principle." — 

A BiKTH EIGHT Qo.VKER. 

ANOTHER FRIEND IN FLORIDA. 

I have taken it from its commencement and value it 
highly. Expect to be a life subscriber. I look upon se- 
crecy and intemperance as two great moral evils which 
are corrupting, and, if not checked or put down, may 
tiually destroy this government. We are going to Flori- 
da for our health and will try and introduce the Gyno&v/re 
there. — Dakius Reynolds, Belvidere, III. 

QUERIES. 

1. Will you please tell me the name of Rev. R. N. 
Countee's paper? What is its price per year? 2. Is J. 
P. St. John a member of the 6. A R ? — E. E. Browne, 
Martin, Green County, Wi.'^. 

1. The Living Way. Price, as we remember, $1 50 
per year. 2. Ex-Governor St. John has been a member 
of but two secret societies, Freemasons and Good Tem- 
plars. 

FROM A SCANDINAVIAN METHODIST BEOTHEK. 

While on a missionary tour through central Texas, I 
called at Bro. N. Jakobson's and found to my inmost sat- 
isfaction your clear and fearless paper, the Christian Cy- 
nosure I took three copies with me and read them 
through. I am in favor of and in sympathy with your 
anti secret society suirit Put me down as one of your 
subscribers.— P. A. Jdhlin, Galveston, Texas. 

A VALUED ENDORSEMENT FROM KNOXVILLE COLLEGE. 

I have long been familiar with the Cynosure and at 
times a subscriber to it. I am very thankful to the donor 
of a years' subscription. I seldom fail to read it and it 
is read by every member of the family, an4 the reading- 
room copy is well read by the students. Respectfully, — 
(Pres.) J. S McCuLLOCH, Knoxville, Tenn. 



all evil, never stops short content with half results; nev- 
er stays its hand at a few defeats of the enemy. 

3 God's promises of mercy always meet with exact ful- 
filment vs 20-25. The exact signification of the miracle 
wrought by Elisha's bones is not easy to see. But no 
miracle was ever wrought that did not have a beautiful 
and mysterious relation with the great central Miracle of 
Scripture. Neither did any promise of God ever remain 
uufultilled. Three times Joish defeats the Syrian hosts 
in battle, but it must always have been a subject for keen 
regietthat he by his weak indecision shimld limit the 
blessing to a partial instead of a complete deliverance. 
LIGHT FROM THE WORD. 

On what occasion had Elisha been a national protec- 
tion? 2 Kin. 6: 9 What is the full measure of the spir- 
itual joys which we may possess? 1 Cor. 2: 9. 



Bible lessons. 



FOURTH QUARTER. 

STUDIES IN THE KINGS AND PROPHETS. 
LESSON V. Nov. 1, 1885.— The Death of Elisha. 3 Kings 13: 
14-25. 
GOLDEN TEXT.— He being dead yet speaketh. Heb. 11 : 4. 
\Open the Bible and read the lesson.'\ 

COMMENTS ON THE LESSON BY E. E. FLAGG. 

1. Bad men often, reverence the good. v. 14. "Joash did 
evil in the sight of the Lord," reads the inspired history, 
"and walked after the sins of Jeroboam, the son of Ne- 
bat, who made Israel to sin;" yet this did not prevent 
him from hearing the news of Elisha's fatal sickness with 
heartfelt sorrow. In his lament over him he recognizes 
the truth that all his armies were not so efficient a protec 
lion for hi.s kingdom as this man of God. The instinct 
ive, involuntary homage which the world always pays to 
true Christianity is the strongest possible proof that there 
it really such a thing. It is in itself a complete refuta 
tion of every infidel argument to the contrary. 

2. Many a failure comes from lack of courage and faith; 
we stop short of God's intentions for us. vs. 15-19. We 
have here an exceedingly interesting insight into the 
king's character. It was essentially a weak one. Joash 
must have understood from Elisha's preceding words that 
the command to smite on the ground held a symbolical 
meaning of the highest importance to himself and his 
kingdom. Yet he smites but thrice. He stops short at 
half a blessing because he lacks the courage and faith to 
grasp a whole one. Yet before we condemn him let us 
examine our own hearts and sec if we are not ourselves 

I doing the same thing. Who among us can say that he 

I or she has grasped the full measure of the riches held out 
to us in the Gospel? Uow often we pray for some great 

j blessing on ourselves or others but not with the importu- 
nate pleadings that refuse to be denied. Reform work 
has many a king Joash — men of small courage and less 
faith- who tell us that they hate Masonry, but do not be- 

' lieve it can ever be put down; who tell us they are pro- 
hibitionists, yet doubt if prohibitory laws can be enforced. 
The courage born of a sure faith that God will put down 



Elisha the Pbopiibt. - Ver. 14. The early history of 
Elisha is given in lesson ii., third quarter. His home was 
at the capital Nothing is recorded of him for 45 years 
after his anointing Jehu to be king. But the testimony 
of Joash shows that Elisha was of great value in the 
kingdom, more than horses and chariots. He was the 
foremost subject in the land There is a mighty power 
in that quiet influence which puts its hands on the very 
helm of the government while it is yet unrecorded in 
history. Who can tell how much worse the kingdom 
might have been but for the influence of Elisha?— Pe^ 

Though the nice recorded miracles of Elisha often af- 
fected only individuals, and his days passed in the quiet 
of ordinary life, his influence was wide and powerful. 
Elijah had lamented at the end of his career the disap- 
pointment of his hopes. Elisha's life, if it knew no 
moments of supreme exaltation, closed amidst universal 
veneration. Nor did the veneration with which he was 
held cease with his life. A splendid monument raised 
over his grave near Samaria was shown with reverence in 
after ages, and funeral dances were celebrated periodical- 
ly in his honor round the sacred spot where he lay. — 
Oeikie. 

"The chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof." 
The virtuous lives, the earnest prayers, the faithful testi- 
mony of the people of God do more to conserve the 
state than armies and navies. No amount of wealth or 
power can save a nation which is morally corrupt —N. 
Hall. 

"Take bow and arrows." It was an ancient custom to 
shoot an arrow or cast a spear into the country which an 
army intended to invad?. Justin says that as soon as 
Alexander the Great had arrived on the coast of Ionia he 
threw a dart into the country of the Persians. The dart, 
spear or arrow thus thrown was an emblem of the com 
mencement of hostilities. — Burder. 

"Elisha put his hands upon the king's hands." To sig- 
nify that it was divine power operating through the king 
which was to be the real cause of Ins success. — Todd. 
In all we do let us ask God to put his hands on ours. Let 
us do nothing in which we cannot expect God's help. Let 
us put OLir hand to nothing in our own strength, but de- 
pending on him to give success. — Lewis 

"The arrow of the Lord's deliverance." This was said 
to explain to Joash the meaning of the symbolical action 
and the one to follow. It meant deliverance from the 
power of Syria. — Peloubet. 

"And the man of God was wroth." He was indignant 
that when such blessings were offc;red, when such deliver- 
ance for his native land was almost thrust upon him, such 
a noble and splendid career was opened before him, the 
young king should be so weak, so blind so wicked as to 
throw away his opportunity, and, like the swine, trample 
such pearls under his feet. — Ptlotibet 

"Now thou Shalt smite Syria but thrice." And from 
every one of his seivants to the end of time, if you give 
them the Capernaum measure of faith, you shall have 
from them Caperaaum measure of v;orks end no more. — 
Ruskin. 

The Design of this Miracle (1) Its significance 
is this: Elisha died and was buried as all men are, but 
even in the grave testimony was borne to his character as 
a prophet and servant of God, and in a manner which 
corresponds exactly to the form of activity of this proph- 
et, who was a preserver, saviour and life giver.- -Xa?i<7e. 
The Lord showed thereby that he was not the God of the 
dead, but of the living; that the dead in him live for him 
(Matthew 22; 32), and do not peris^h with the body. It 
was a testimony to the reality of another life — Peloubet. 
"Three times did Joash beat him." Or "smite" him. 
The prophecy was f-jlttlled. In.siead of following up his 
victories to the utter annihilation of the Syrian power, he 
was content with these three triumphs, and so justified 
the rebuke of the dying Elisha. Israel soon fell back 
into most bitter iiflbctions and extremity (chap. 14: 27). 
Whedon. And Joash hims-elf not only followed the sins 
of Jeroboam, but attacked .Jerusalem and carried the tem- 
ple treasures to Samaria, the capital of his own kingdom 
(3 Kings 14:12-14. 



Pr. John Hall once said to theological students 
that the minister who should open up the beauties 
and treasures of the minor prophets would be doing 
for the Bible what Livingston and Stanley had done 
for the world in exploring Central Africa. What the 
nations of Europe recently regarded as little more 
than the lair of savage beasts and still more savage 
men, is now found to be a new world of comtnercial 
importance, worthy of diplomatic conquest. So the 
minor prophets will be found "profitable," not only 
for "instruction in righteousness," but also in social 
science. — W. F. Crafts. 



October 22, 1885 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSintBI. 



FREEMASONRY. 

False, more foul than false, and cruel most 

of all 
Rampant and revelroiis, God decrees thy tall : 
E'en angels fell at thy polluting tact, 
Apostacy eternal is thy crowning act. 
Most cruel bondage of body, mind and soul, 
Astute in badness man's being to control ; 
Supreme in falseness and hypocrisy, 
Oii£ virtue claims - her secrecy, 
Naught but doom from their first abode 
Remains to rebels, and that doom from God; 
Ye rebel sons of Baal, escape the mystic road. 
Nathan Callender. 



ANTI-MASONIC LECTURERS. 

Gbnkral Agent and Lecturer, J. P. 
Stoddard, 221 West Madison street, Chi- 
cago. 

H. H. Hinman, Wiilirnantic Coca. 
State Agents. 

Illinois, Geo. T. Dissette, Cynosure of- 
fice 

Indiana, S. L. Cook of Albion 

Mich., A. H Springstein, Wayne. 

Missouri, M. N. Butler, Burlington .June. 

Minn., J. P. Richards, care Prof Paine, 
Wasioja. 

New York, W. B. Stoddard, Dale. 

Wisconsin, Isaac Bancroft. Monroe 

Kansas, Robert Loggan, Clifton. 

Degree Workers, — [Seceders 1 
I. K. Glassford, Carthage, Mo. 
D P Rath bun, Syracuse, N Y 

OTttBR Lecturers. 

0. A. Blanchard, Wheaton, 111. 

S. Callender, Thompson, Pa. 

•J S. Timmons, Tarentum, Pa 

J. H. Baird, Templeton, Pa. 

T. B. McCormick, Princeton, hid. 

E. Johnson, Dayton, Ind. 

H. A. Day, Williamstown, Mich. 

J. M. Bishop, Chambersburg, Ps. 

A. Mayn, Bloomington, Ind. 

J. B. Cressinger, Sullivan, O. 

W. M. Love, Osceola, Mo. 

A. D. Freeman, Downers Grove, Hi 

E. Mathews, Spring Arbor, Mich. 

Wm. Fentop St Paul, Minn. 

E. I Grinne'l, Blairsburg, iowii. 

Warren Taylor, South Salem, O. 

J. 3. Perrv, Thompson, Conn 

C. F. Hawley, Wlieaton, 111. 

J. T. Michael, New Wilmington, Pa. 

8. C. Kimbali, New Marljei,, V n 

i. G. Barton, Breckiuridee, Mo 

■Joel H. Austin, Goshen, Ind 

J. F. Browne, Berea, Ky. 

E. Barneteon, Jackson VaUev, '>^«. 

Wm. R. Roach, Pickerins;:, Ont. 

I). A. RfchardP, Brigh'oh, VTu-h 

R.'J. Williams, Winnebago City, Minn. 




STATUE Of "LIBERTY EKLIBHTENINI} THEWOELD." 

More Money Heeded. 

The Committee in charge of the construction 
of the pedestal and the erection of the Statue, 
in oi'der to i-aise fviiitls Tor 
its ooiiii>letion, have prepared, from 
model furnished by the artiiit, a perfect facsimile 
Miniature Statuette, which they are delivering 
to subscribers throus'hout the United States at 
the following prices : 

No. 1 Statuette, s^x inches in height,— the 
Statue bronzed ; Pedestal, nickel-silvered,— at 
Oiae l>ollaf eaoli, delivered. 

No. 2 Statuette, in same metal, iweh^e inches 
hiqh, beautifully bronzed and nickeled, at 
3?"i-ve Ooliai's eaclj, delivered, 

No. 3 Statuette, twelve inches high, finely 
chased, Statue bronzed, Pedestal, llea^^ily 
S^ilvei"=F*latecI, with plush stand, at 
Ten I>olla,i'S each, delivered. 

Much time and money have been spent in 
perfecting the Statuettes, and they are much 
improved over the first sent out. The Com- 
mittee have received from subscribers many 
letters of commendatioTi. 

The New York World fund of $100 000 com- 
pletes the Pedestal, but it is estimated that 
S40,000 is yet needed to pa.v for tlie iron fasten- 
ings and the erection ot the Statue;. 

LibfTiil subscriptions for the Miniatttre Statu- 
ettes vrtll pi oduce the desired amount. 

Address, with remittance, 

mCHABD BUTLER, Secretary, 
American Committee of the Statue of Liberty, 
33 Mercer Street, New York. 

Aiivtriisere who wisii to secure the &:- 
vention of the best class of purchasers, 
wi)< 6nd It tft ffeeir jwivaMage to secure 
space -Ji fe« UMEISTIA^ CTN08URE. 



The American Party. 



FiKST Nomination for President at Oberlin, 
Ohio, May 33, 1872. 

Platform Adopted at Chicago, June 28, 
1873. 

Name Adopted at Syracuse, N. T., June 3, 
1874. 

PRESIDENTAL CANDIDATES : 

1873— Charles Francis Adams and Joseph L. 
Barlow. 

1876— James B. Walker and Donald Kirkpat- 
rick. 

1880— J. W. Phelps and Samuel C. Pomeroy. 

1884— J. Blanchard and J. W. Conant nomi- 
nated; the former withdrawing, Samuel C. 
Pomeroy was nominated. Both nominees with- 
drawing, the support of the party was generally 
given to John P. St. John and William Daniel, 
candidates of the Prohibition party. 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

F. W. Capwdl, New York ; J. A. OonanL Con- 
necticut; E. 6. Paine, Minnesota; (f. W. Nee- 
dels, Missouri; E. D. Bailey, District of Colum- 
bia (Ex. Com.) James Kennedy, California; 
Robert Hardie, Dakota; J. F. Galloway, Flori- 
da; L. N. Stratton, Illinois; Israel Hess, Indi- 
ana; J. N. Norris, Iowa; li. Curtis, Kansas, S. 
A. Pratt, Massachusetts; H. A. Day, Michigan ; 
E. Tapley, Mississippi; S. C. Kimball, New 
Hampshire; Rjbert Armstrong, New Jersey; 
E. A. Foldstrom, Nebraska ; J. M. Scott, Ohio ; 
Wm. H. Pruett, Oregon; A. M, Paull, Rhode 
Island; J. W. Moss, West Virginia; M. R. Brit- 
ten, Wisconsin. 

AMERICAN PLA TFORM. 



adopted at CHICAGO, JUNE 20, 1884. 

Viewing with deep concern the corrupt and 
unsettled condition of American politics, and 
witnessing with alarm the fearful prevalence of 
caste and clannishness by which our citizens 
are being arrayed in hostile bands, working se- 
cretly to compass political ends, a method di- 
rectly and powerfully tending to increase cor- 
ruption, to destroy mutual coniidence, and 
hasten disruption and bloodshed; and having 
no hope of adequate remedy for these evils 
from existing parties, and believing the foun- 
dation of a party based upon the fundamental 
principles of the Declaration of American In- 
dependence, both inevitable and indispensable : 

We, therefore, a portion of the American 
people, believing with our fathers that we have 
our rights and liberties, not from men or par- 
ties, but from God; believing in the Christian 
marriage, and not in Mormonism; believing in 
the religious democracy of the New Testament, 
and not in the despotism of the lodge; believ- 
ing, also, with our Scotch and English ancest- 
ors, that civil government, though ordained in 
God, i« "founded in nature, not in grace," and, 
therefore, that all have equal civil rights ; while 
we abhor the idea of enforcing religion or con- 
trolling conscience by human laws and penal- 
ties as calculated to make hypocrites, not 
Christians, and savoring of the days of priest- 
ism, the fagot and the stake, we at the same 
time as firmly believe that atheism and priest- 
craft are twins and both alike foes to human 
liberty and welfare. We further most firmly 
believe that a government without God has 
none but lynch power, and is destitute of all 
legitimate authority to maintain civil order, to 
swear a witness, to try a criminal, to hang a 
murderer, to imprison a thief; and while we 
consider government without God as a mere 
usurpation, we regard all religions and wor- 
ships invented by men, and so having no high- 
er than human origin, as mere swindling impo- 
sitions and cheats. We believe in peace and in 
national arbitration as a means of perpetuating 
it; yet we as profoundly believe that the 
bravery and blood of our soldiers have bought 
us the peace which Vi'e enjoy, and we ho